Zezé Motta

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Zezé Motta
Zeze Motta 2011.jpg
Born Maria José Motta de Oliveira
(1944-06-27) June 27, 1944 (age 72)
Campos dos Goytacazes, Brazil
Nationality Brazilian
Ethnicity Afro-Brazilian
Occupation Actress and singer
Years active 1966–present

Maria José Motta de Oliveira, known as Zezé Motta (born June 27, 1944)[1] is a Brazilian actress and singer. She is considered one of the most important black actresses in Brazil.[2]

Life and career[edit]

Born in Campos dos Goytacazes, she moved with her family to Rio de Janeiro at the age of two. She attended the school of Tablado Theatre and began her acting career in 1966, starring in the play Roda-viva, by Chico Buarque.[2] Other plays she worked in include Arena Conta Zumbi (1969), Orfeu Negro (1972), and Godspell (1974) She began her singing career in 1971 in the nightclubs of São Paulo. Between 1975 and 1979, she released three LPs, and a further three albums in the 1980s. In 1976 she starred in the film Xica da Silva.[2] Over the decades she has acted in some of the most popular television soap operas and series.[3][4]


  1. Gerson Conrad & Zezé Motta (1974) LP/CD
  2. Zezé Motta (Prazer, Zezé) (1978) LP/CD
  3. Negritude (1979) LP/CD
  4. Anunciação / Negritude (1980) Compacto
  5. Dengo (1980) LP/CD
  6. O Nosso Amor / Três Travestis (1982) Compacto
  7. Frágil Força (1984) LP
  8. Quarteto Negro (with Paulo Moura, Djalma Correia and Jorge Degas) (1987) LP/CD
  9. La Femme Enchantée (1987) DVD
  10. A Chave dos Segredos (1995) CD
  11. Divina Saudade (2000)
  12. E-Collection Sucessos + Raridades (2001) 2 CDs
  13. Negra Melodia (2011) CD




  1. ^ Lopes, Nei (2004). Enciclopedia Brasileira Da Diaspora Africana. Selo Negro. p. 454. ISBN 978-85-87478-21-4. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c Lopes, Nei (2006). Dicionario Escolar Afro-Brasileiro. Selo Negro. p. 173. ISBN 978-85-87478-29-0. Retrieved 28 August 2012. 
  3. ^ "Zezé Motta: One of Brazil’s most respected actresses", Black women of Brazil.
  4. ^ Alvaro Neder, Artist biography, AllMusic.

External links[edit]