Boulogne-Billancourt

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Boulogne-Billancourt
Boulogne streets.JPG
Coat of arms of Boulogne-Billancourt
Coat of arms
Paris and inner ring départements
Paris and inner ring départements
Coordinates: 48°50′07″N 2°14′27″E / 48.83520°N 02.2409°E / 48.83520; 02.2409Coordinates: 48°50′07″N 2°14′27″E / 48.83520°N 02.2409°E / 48.83520; 02.2409
Country France
Region Île-de-France
Department Hauts-de-Seine
Arrondissement Boulogne-Billancourt
Intercommunality Val de Seine
Government
 • Mayor (2008–2014) Pierre-Christophe Baguet
Area
 • Land1 6.17 km2 (2.38 sq mi)
Population (2006)
 • Population2 112,043
 • Population2 density 18,000/km2 (47,000/sq mi)
INSEE/Postal code 92012 / 92100
Elevation 28–40 m (92–131 ft)

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Boulogne-Billancourt (French pronunciation: ​[bu.lɔɲ.bi.jɑ̃.kuʁ]; often colloquially called simply Boulogne) is a commune in the western suburbs of Paris, France. It is located 8.2 km (5.1 mi) from the centre of Paris. Boulogne-Billancourt is a subprefecture of the Hauts-de-Seine department and the seat of the Arrondissement of Boulogne-Billancourt.

With an average household income of €28,742, Boulogne-Billancourt is the wealthiest among French communes of more than 100,000 inhabitants, followed by Paris.[1]

Boulogne-Billancourt is the most populous suburb of Paris and one of the most densely populated municipalities in Europe.[citation needed] Formerly an important industrial site, it has successfully reconverted into business services and is now home to major communication companies headquartered in the Val de Seine business district.

Name[edit]

The original name of the commune was Boulogne-sur-Seine (meaning "Boulogne upon Seine").

Before the 14th century, Boulogne was a small village called Menuls-lès-Saint-Cloud (meaning "Menuls near Saint-Cloud"). In the beginning of the 14th century, King Philip IV of France ordered the building in Menuls-lès-Saint-Cloud of a church dedicated to the virgin of the sanctuary of Boulogne-sur-Mer, then a famous pilgrimage center in northern France. The church, meant to become a pilgrimage centre closer to Paris than the distant city of Boulogne-sur-Mer, was named Notre-Dame de Boulogne la Petite ("Our Lady of Boulogne the Minor"). Gradually, the village of Menuls-lès-Saint-Cloud became known as Boulogne-la-Petite, and later as Boulogne-sur-Seine.

In 1924, Boulogne-sur-Seine was officially renamed Boulogne-Billancourt to reflect the development of the industrial neighbourhood of Billancourt annexed in 1860 (see history section below).

As for the name Billancourt, it was recorded for the first time in 1150 as Bullencort, sometimes also spelled Bollencort. It comes from Medieval Latin cortem, accusative of cors, meaning "enclosure", "estate", suffixed to the Germanic patronym Buolo (meaning "friend, brother, kinsman"), thus having the meaning of "estate of Buolo".

History[edit]

On 1 January 1860, the city of Paris was enlarged by annexing neighbouring communes. On that occasion, the communes of Auteuil and Passy were disbanded and divided between Boulogne-Billancourt (then called Boulogne-sur-Seine) and the city of Paris. Boulogne-sur-Seine received a small part of the territory of Passy, and about half of the territory of Auteuil (including the area of Billancourt, which belonged to the disbanded commune of Auteuil).

Some of the shooting events of the 1900 Summer Olympics took place in Boulogne-Billancourt.[2]

In 1929, the Bois de Boulogne, which was hitherto divided between the communes of Boulogne-Billancourt and Neuilly-sur-Seine, was annexed in its entirety by the city of Paris. On that occasion, Boulogne-Billancourt, to which most of the Bois de Boulogne belonged, lost about half of its territory.

Boulogne-Billancourt is famous for being the birthplace of three major French industries: cinema,[citation needed] automobile with Renault,[citation needed] and aircraft.[citation needed] It is also famous for being the setting of the TV show "Code Lyoko."

Administration[edit]

With the city of Sèvres, Boulogne-Billancourt is part of the communauté d'agglomération Val de Seine.

Transport[edit]

Boulogne-Billancourt is served by two stations on Paris Métro Line 10: Boulogne – Jean Jaurès and Boulogne – Pont de Saint-Cloud.

It is also served by three stations on Paris Métro Line 9: Marcel Sembat, Billancourt, and Pont de Sèvres.

Economy[edit]

Boulogne-Billancourt hosts the global headquarters of several multinational companies, including:

Prior to 2000 Schneider Electric's head office was in Boulogne-Billancourt.[6]

Main sights[edit]

  • The Musée Albert-Kahn at 14, rue du Port, Boulogne-Billancourt is a national museum and includes four hectares of gardens, joining together landscape scenes of various national traditions. The museum also includes historic photographs and film.
  • The Musée des Années Trente is a museum of artistic and industrial objects from the 1930s.

Famous people[edit]

Boulogne-Billancourt was the birthplace of:

International relations[edit]

Twin towns — Sister cities[edit]

Boulogne-Billancourt is twinned with:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List of French cities of more than 100,000 inhabitants by wealth" (in French). Linternaute.com. Retrieved 2012-05-19. 
  2. ^ "1900 Summer Olympics official report" (in French). La84foundation.org. p. 16. Retrieved November 14, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Legal Infos". Carrefour. Retrieved May 3, 2012.  "This site is published by Carrefour, a limited company (société anonyme) capitalised at €1,698,340,000, headquartered at 33, avenue Émile Zola, 92100 Boulogne Billancourt, [...]"
  4. ^ "FAQ". Pika Édition. Retrieved May 1, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Boulogne-Billancourt - RSAS". Renault. Retrieved September 22, 2009. 
  6. ^ "Schneider-Electric s'est installé chez une filiale" (in French). journaldunet.com. Retrieved July 8, 2010. 
  7. ^ "British towns twinned with French towns [via WaybackMachine.com]". Archant Community Media Ltd. Archived from the original on 5 July 2013. Retrieved 2013-07-20. 
  8. ^ "Ra'anana: Twin towns & Sister cities - Friends around the World". raanana.muni.il. Retrieved 24 March 2010. 

External links[edit]