Mount Olive Township, New Jersey

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Mount Olive Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Mount Olive
Mount Olive Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Mount Olive Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Mount Olive Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mount Olive Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°51′57″N 74°44′35″W / 40.865767°N 74.743029°W / 40.865767; -74.743029Coordinates: 40°51′57″N 74°44′35″W / 40.865767°N 74.743029°W / 40.865767; -74.743029[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated March 22, 1871
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Robert Greenbaum (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator Sean Canning[4]
 • Clerk Lisa Lashway[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 31.079 sq mi (80.495 km2)
 • Land 29.407 sq mi (76.165 km2)
 • Water 1.672 sq mi (4.331 km2)  5.38%
Area rank 84th of 566 in state
4th of 39 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 948 ft (289 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 28,117
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 28,738
 • Rank 80th of 566 in state
2nd of 39 in county[12]
 • Density 956.1/sq mi (369.2/km2)
 • Density rank 390th of 566 in state
29th of 39 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07828 - Budd Lake[13][14]
Area code(s) 908 and 973[15]
FIPS code 3402749080[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882197[1][18]
Website www.mountolivetownship.com

Mount Olive Township is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 28,117,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 3,924 (+16.2%) from the 24,193 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,911 (+13.7%) from the 21,282 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

The Township of Mount Olive was formed by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 22, 1871, from portions of Roxbury Township.[20][21] Netcong was formed from portions of the township on October 23, 1894.[20]

Budd Lake (with a 2010 Census population of 8,968[22]) is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated community located within Mount Olive Township.[23][24][25] Flanders is an unincorporated community located within the Township.

Geography[edit]

Mount Olive Township is located at 40°51′57″N 74°44′35″W / 40.865767°N 74.743029°W / 40.865767; -74.743029 (40.865767,-74.743029). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 31.079 square miles (80.495 km2), of which, 29.407 square miles (76.165 km2) of it was land and 1.672 square miles (4.331 km2) of it (5.38%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,982
1890 1,848 −6.8%
1900 1,221 * −33.9%
1910 1,160 −5.0%
1920 1,008 −13.1%
1930 1,235 22.5%
1940 1,526 23.6%
1950 2,597 70.2%
1960 3,807 46.6%
1970 10,394 173.0%
1980 18,748 80.4%
1990 21,282 13.5%
2000 24,193 13.7%
2010 28,117 16.2%
Est. 2013 28,738 [11][26] 2.2%
Population sources:
1880-1920[27] 1880-1890[28]
1890-1910[29] 1910-1930[30]
1930-1990[31] 2000[32][33] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[20]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 28,117 people, 10,690 households, and 7,323 families residing in the township. The population density was 956.1 per square mile (369.2/km2). There were 11,244 housing units at an average density of 382.4 per square mile (147.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 80.66% (22,679) White, 5.74% (1,614) Black or African American, 0.20% (55) Native American, 8.23% (2,315) Asian, 0.04% (12) Pacific Islander, 2.86% (805) from other races, and 2.27% (637) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 11.51% (3,237) of the population.[8]

There were 10,690 households, of which 36.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.7% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.5% were non-families. 25.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.22.[8]

In the township, 26.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 9.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.8 years. For every 100 females there were 97.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.6 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $77,243 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,287) and the median family income was $102,448 (+/- $8,454). Males had a median income of $70,532 (+/- $5,545) versus $52,205 (+/- $4,050) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,758 (+/- $1,723). About 3.8% of families and 5.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.7% of those under age 18 and 6.1% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 24,193 people, 9,068 households, and 6,374 families residing in the township. The population density was 797.0 people per square mile (307.8/km²). There were 9,311 housing units at an average density of 306.7 per square mile (118.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 86.69% White, 3.79% African American, 0.17% Native American, 6.00% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.53% from other races, and 1.81% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.97% of the population.[32][33]

There were 9,068 households out of which 39.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.6% were married couples living together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.7% were non-families. 23.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.22.[32][33]

In the township the population was spread out with 27.6% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 37.6% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 6.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 100.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.3 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the township was $64,515, and the median income for a family was $75,189. Males had a median income of $50,653 versus $35,882 for females. The per capita income for the township was $28,691. About 1.7% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 3.5% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Starting from its inception in 1871, Mount Olive was governed under the Township form of municipal government, by a three-person Township Committee. In 1968, the Township Committee was expanded to five members. Effective January 1, 1972, the voters in the Township approved a change to a Mayor-Council form of government, which would be governed by a directly elected mayor and a seven-member Township Council elected on an at-large basis. The mayor would operate the government with the assistance of a Township Administrator, with the Council performing a legislative role.[21]

Local government[edit]

Mount Olive Township is governed under the Optional Municipal Charter Law's (Faulkner Act) Mayor-Council form of government (Plan E), enacted based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission.[35] This provides a "Strong Mayor" form of government, with a separately elected mayor and council, who each serve for four-year terms of office.[6] The mayor, who is elected directly by the people, is the Chief Executive Officer of the Township. The Mayor is responsible for carrying out all Council decisions and for the day-to-day operation of all functions of the municipality. The Township Council consists of seven members elected on an at-large basis with staggered terms in elections held every two years with either three seats or four seats coming up for vote. The Township Council is the legislative branch of the government charged with approving the municipal budget and enacting the ordinances (laws) of the municipality. The council elects a Council President from among its membersat an annual reorganization meeting. The Council President presides at all council meetings.

As of 2013, the Mayor of Mount Olive Township is Republican Robert Greenbaum, term ends December 31, 2015).[36] Members of the Township Council are Council President Colleen Labow (R, 2015), Council Vice President John Ferrante (R, 2015), John Mania (R, 2013), Joe Nicastro (R, 2015), Ray Perkins (R, 2013) and Alex Roman (R, 2015), with one vacant seat.[37][38][39] Serving a term scheduled to end in December 2013, Patrick Walsh resigned from office in February 2013, citing internal conflicts in the township's Republican Party government.[40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Mount Olive Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[41] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[9][42][43] Prior to the 2010 Census, Mount Olive Township had been part of the 11th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[44]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[45] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[46][47] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[48][49]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[50][51] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[53]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[54] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[55] As of 2014, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas Mastrangelo (Montville, term ends December 31, 2016),[56] Deputy Freeholder Director David Scapicchio (Mount Olive Township, 2015),[57] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[58] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2015),[59] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, 2016),[60] John Krickus (Washington Township, 2015)[61] and William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2014).[62][55][63] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[64] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[65] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2014).[55][66]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 15,159 registered voters in Mount Olive Township, of which 2,984 (19.7%) were registered as Democrats, 4,930 (32.5%) were registered as Republicans and 7,226 (47.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 19 voters registered to other parties.[67]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 52.9% of the vote here (6,191 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 45.5% (5,327 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (123 votes), among the 11,705 ballots cast by the township's 15,776 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.2%.[68] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 59.0% of the vote here (6,330 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 39.9% (4,287 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (91 votes), among the 10,731 ballots cast by the township's 14,794 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 72.5.[69]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 63.4% of the vote here (4,663 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 27.1% (1,995 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.1% (596 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (50 votes), among the 7,351 ballots cast by the township's 15,468 registered voters, yielding a 47.5% turnout.[70]

Education[edit]

The Mount Olive Township School District serves public school students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics.[71]) are four elementary schools — Chester M. Stephens Elementary School[72] (grades K-5; 705 students), Mountain View Elementary School[73] (K-5; 600), Sandshore Elementary School[74] (K-5; 401) and Tinc Road Elementary School[75] (K-5; 525) — Mount Olive Middle School[76] (6-8; 1,143) and Mount Olive High School[77] (9-12; 1,157).[78]

Public library[edit]

The Mount Olive Public Library serves the informational, educational, cultural, and recreational resource of the township. It is the objective of the Library to serve the community with programs, books and other media. The Mount Olive Township Library Association was incorporated in 1976. In 1979, a major addition was added to the original octagon. In 1985, the township held a referendum with voters overwhelmingly in favor of municipalization. The Library officially became a municipal library in 1986. In 1991, a second addition was added to include an administrative area and the periodical/reading room. In January 2005 the new library which was built on Flanders-Drakestown Road opened for residents.[79]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 140.17 miles (225.58 km) of roadways, of which 115.11 miles (185.25 km) were maintained by the municipality, 10.03 miles (16.14 km) by Morris County and 15.03 miles (24.19 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[80]

The major roads that pass through include U.S. Route 46 through the center,[81] U.S. Route 206 in the east and northeast part (called the "Netcong Bypass")[82] and Interstate 80 (Bergen Passaic Expressway) in the north (which is also briefly multiplexed with US 206).[83]

Public transportation[edit]

Commuter rail service is offered by New Jersey Transit at the Mount Olive station[84] along its Morristown Line and Montclair-Boonton Line, offering service to Hoboken Terminal in Hoboken, New Jersey, Newark Broad Street Station, Secaucus Junction and Pennsylvania Station in Midtown Manhattan.[85][86]

New Jersey Transit local bus service had been offered on the MCM5 route.[87] Nowadays, bus service is provided along Route 46 to Netcong and Dover.[88]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Mount Olive Township include:

References[edit]

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  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Directory, Mount Olive Township. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  5. ^ Clerks Department, Mount Olive Township. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Mount Olive, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Mount Olive township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed October 29, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Mount Olive township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Mount Olive, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Mount Olive, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 29, 2012.
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  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  20. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 195. Accessed October 29, 2012.
  21. ^ a b The History of Mt. Olive, Mount Olive Township. Accessed July 17, 2006.
  22. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Budd Lake CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  23. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  24. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  25. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  26. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
  27. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  28. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  29. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  30. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  31. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Mount Olive township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Mount Olive township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Mount Olive township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  35. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  36. ^ Mayor's Pager, Mount Olive Township. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  37. ^ Government and Officials, Mount Olive Township. Accessed October 23, 2013.
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  39. ^ Morris County Manual 2012, p. 50. Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  40. ^ Staff. "Job conflicts force Walsh to resign from Mount Olive Township Council; Democrat, turned Republican, turned unaffiliated steps down", Mount Olive Chronicle, March 8, 2013. Accessed October 23, 2013. "Citing job demands and after having become disenchanted with Republican politics, Township Councilman Patrick Walsh is resigning after less than four years on the job."
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  58. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  59. ^ John Cesaro, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  60. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  61. ^ John Krickus, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  62. ^ William "Hank" Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
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  71. ^ Data for the Mount Olive Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  72. ^ Chester M. Stephens Elementary School, Mount Olive Township School District. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  73. ^ Mountain View Elementary School, Mount Olive Township School District. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  74. ^ Sandshore Elementary School, Mount Olive Township School District. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  75. ^ Tinc Road Elementary School, Mount Olive Township School District. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  76. ^ Mount Olive Middle School, Mount Olive Township School District. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  77. ^ Mount Olive High School, Mount Olive Township School District. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  78. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Mount Olive Township School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  79. ^ About Us, Mount Olive Public Library. Accessed December 20, 2012.
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  82. ^ U.S. Route 206 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  83. ^ Interstate 80 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 23, 2013.
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  85. ^ Montclair-Boonton Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  86. ^ Morristown Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  87. ^ MorrisCounty Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed October 23, 2013.
  88. ^ Morris on the Move (M.O.M.) Timetable, Morris County Department of Transportation, October 12, 2011. Acessed October 6, 2014.
  89. ^ Hoffman, Joe. "Mt. Olive's Rouson headed to Colorado", Daily Record (Morristown), February 2, 2006. Accessed March 26, 2011.
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External links[edit]