List of neighbourhoods in Edmonton

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Map of Edmonton and adjoining St. Albert and Sherwood Park

The City of Edmonton, the provincial capital of Alberta, Canada, is divided into 7 geographic sectors[1] and 375 neighbourhoods,[2] not including those proposed and planned neighbourhoods that have yet to be developed. This article generally describes each sector, their neighbourhoods, and the applicable intermediary areas between the sector and neighbourhood geographic levels.

Mature area sector[edit]

Edmonton's mature area sector, or inner city, corresponds with those neighbourhoods deemed mature neighbourhoods in the city's municipal development plan.[3] The sector's neighbourhoods, primarily residential in nature, were essentially built out prior to 1970.[3] It includes the city's central core, which includes its downtown.[3] It also includes neighbourhoods within the five former municipalities that Edmonton absorbed between 1912 and 1964, as well as mature neighbourhoods beyond the central core and these municipalities.

Central core[edit]

Central core
Area
Edmonton's downtown core
Edmonton's downtown core
Central core is located in Edmonton
Central core
Central core
Location of Edmonton's central core
Coordinates: 53°32′38″N 113°29′28″W / 53.544°N 113.491°W / 53.544; -113.491
Country  Canada
Province  Alberta
City Edmonton
Quadrant[4] NW
Ward[4] 6 & 8
Government[5]
 • Administrative body Edmonton City Council
 • Councillors Jane Batty & Ben Henderson
Elevation 671 m (2,201 ft)

Edmonton's central core comprises Downtown Edmonton and its 11 surrounding neighbourhoods including Boyle Street, Central McDougall, McCauley, Oliver, Queen Mary Park, Riverdale and Rossdale on the north side of the North Saskatchewan River and Cloverdale, Garneau, Strathcona and the University of Alberta on the south side of the river.[3]

Downtown[edit]

Main article: Downtown Edmonton

Edmonton's downtown core, officially named as Downtown, is generally bounded by 109 Street and 111 Street to the west, 105 Avenue to the north, 97 Street to the east, Grierson Hill and Rossdale Road to the southeast, and 97 Avenue and Rossdale Road to the south.[4]

Development within Downtown is guided by the Capital City Downtown Plan.[6] The plan subdivides Downtown into five smaller neighbourhoods, of which four of the five are further subdivided into sub areas.[6]

Former municipalities[edit]

Main article: Edmonton annexations

The City of Edmonton has absorbed five urban municipalities in its history – the City of Strathcona in 1912, the Village of North Edmonton in 1912, the Village of West Edmonton (Calder) in 1917, the Town of Beverly in 1961 and the Town of Jasper Place in 1964.[7] The boundaries of these former municipalities are wholly within Edmonton's mature area sector.

Beverly[edit]

Main article: Beverly, Alberta

In the late 1950s, the Town of Beverly was bounded by 50 Street to the west and the North Saskatchewan River and 104 Avenue to the south, while its eastern boundary comprised 36 Street south of 118 Avenue and 34 Street north of 118 Avenue.[8] Its northern boundary was located north of the Canadian National (CN) main line, generally paralleling it in a northwest direction from 34 Street to a quarter section line and then following this line west to 50 Street just south of 127 Avenue.[8] Annexed by Edmonton in 1961, the City of Edmonton indicates Beverly's former boundaries are 50 Street to the west, Yellowhead Trail to the north and the river to the south and east.[9]

Edmonton neighbourhoods within the former Town of Beverly include Abbottsfield, Beacon Heights, Bergman, Beverly Heights and Rundle Heights.[9][10]

Jasper Place[edit]

Main article: Jasper Place, Alberta

Prior to being absorbed by the City of Edmonton, the Town of Jasper Place was bounded by 149 Street to the east, 118 Avenue to the north and 170 Street to the west, while its southern boundary comprised 83 Avenue west of 156 Street and the North Saskatchewan River east of 156 Street.[8]

Edmonton residential neighbourhoods within the former Town of Jasper Place include Britannia Youngstown, Canora, Elmwood, Glenwood, High Park, Jasper Park, Lynnwood, Mayfield, Meadowlark Park, Rio Terrace, Sherwood, West Jasper Place and West Meadowlark Park.[4][8] Industrial neighbourhoods formerly within Jasper Place include Alberta Park Industrial, Garside Industrial, High Park Industrial, Norwester Industrial, Sheffield Industrial, West Sheffield Industrial and Youngstown Industrial.[4][8]

North Edmonton[edit]

Prior to being absorbed by the City of Edmonton on July 22, 1912,[11][12] the Village of North Edmonton consisted of four quarter sections of land[13] in northeast corner of Edmonton's mature area sector.[1] The former village, bounded by 58 Street to the east, 122 Avenue to the south, 74 Street to the west and 132 Avenue to the north,[14] now includes portions of the neighbourhoods of Balwin, Belvedere, Industrial Heights, Kennedale Industrial and Yellowhead Corridor East.[4]

Strathcona[edit]

Main article: Strathcona, Alberta

Prior to amalgamating with the City of Edmonton, the City of Strathcona was bounded by the North Saskatchewan River to the west and north and 91 Street to the east, while its southern boundary comprised 62 Avenue east of 111 Street and 68 Avenue west of 111 Street.[14] Whitemud Creek comprised the brief portion of the Strathcona's west boundary between 68 Avenue and the river.[14]

Edmonton neighbourhoods wholly within the former City of Strathcona include Belgravia, CPR Irvine, Garneau, Hazeldean, McKernan, Mill Creek Ravine North, Queen Alexandra, Ritchie, River Valley Mayfair, River Valley Walterdale (including the former neighbourhood of Walterdale), Strathcona, Strathcona Junction (formerly CPR West), the University of Alberta and Windsor Park.[4][14] Neighbourhoods partially within the eastern portion of the former City of Strathcona include Bonnie Doon, Cloverdale, King Edward Park, Mill Creek Ravine South and Strathearn.[4][14] Neighbourhoods partially within the southern portion of the former city include Allendale, Calgary Trail North, Parkallen, River Valley Whitemud, Rosedale Industrial and the University of Alberta Farm.[4][14] Four of the neighbourhoods wholly or partially within the former city – Cloverdale, Garneau, Strathcona and the University of Alberta – are also within Edmonton's central core.[3]

West Edmonton[edit]

Prior to being absorbed by the City of Edmonton on April 17, 1917,[14] the Village of West Edmonton, also known as Calder,[15] comprised one quarter section[16] at the northeast corner of 127 Street and 127 Avenue[14] near the northwest corner of Edmonton's mature area sector.[1] This quarter section now forms the western half of the Calder neighbourhood.[4]

Casselman-Steele Heights[edit]

The southwest portion of the Casselman-Steele Heights residential area[17] is located within Edmonton's mature area sector,[1] consisting of the York neighbourhood bounded by 144 Avenue to the north, 50 Street to the east, Manning Drive to the southeast, 137 Avenue to the south and 66 Street to the west.[4] The balance of the Casselman-Steele Heights residential area is located within Edmonton's northeast sector.[1][17]

Dickinsfield[edit]

Dickinsfield is located at the northern edge of the mature area sector. Consisting of the neighbourhoods of Evansdale and Northmount,[4] the area is bounded by 97 Street (Highway 28) to the west, 137 Avenue to the south, 82 Street to the east, and 153 Avenue to the north.[17]

Londonderry[edit]

Main article: Londonderry, Edmonton

Londonderry is located at the northern edge of the mature area sector. Consisting of the neighbourhoods of Kildare and Kilkenny,[4] the area is bounded by 82 Street to the west, 137 Avenue to the south, 66 Street to the east, and 153 Avenue to the north.[17]

Other areas[edit]

The following is a list of other neighbourhoods within Edmonton's mature area sector.[4]

North sector[edit]

Edmonton's suburban north sector is bounded by 142 Street to the west, Sturgeon County including CFB Edmonton to the north, and 66 Street to the east. Its southern boundary is formed by 137 Avenue and 153 Avenue west and east of 97 Street (Highway 28) respectively.[1]

Castle Downs[edit]

Castle Downs, including Castle Downs Extension, is located in the central portion of Edmonton's north sector.[1][18] The area is bounded by 127 Street to the west and Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the north.[18] To the east, it is bounded by 97 Street to the north of 153 Avenue and Castle Downs Road (113A Street) to the south of 153 Avenue.[18] To the south, it is bounded by 137 Avenue to the west of Castle Downs Road and 153 Avenue to the east of Castle Downs Road.[18] The following 11 neighbourhoods comprise Castle Downs.[4]

Lake District[edit]

Lake District, also known as Edmonton North, is located in the eastern portion of Edmonton's north sector.[1] The area is bounded by 97 Street (Highway 28) to the west, Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the north, 66 Street to the east and 153 Avenue to the south.[19] The following nine neighbourhoods comprise Lake District.[4]

The Palisades[edit]

The Palisades is located in the western portion of Edmonton's north sector.[1] The area is bounded by a Canadian National rail line to the west, Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the north, 127 Street to the east and 137 Avenue to the south.[20] The following six neighbourhoods comprise The Palisades.[4]

Other areas[edit]

Other neighbourhoods within Edmonton's north sector not within larger residential areas include Goodridge Corners and Griesbach.[1]

Northeast sector[edit]

Edmonton's suburban northeast sector is generally bounded by 66 Street and CFB Edmonton within Sturgeon County to the west, Highway 37 to the north, 33 Street NE to the northeast, the North Saskatchewan River to the east and southeast, and Yellowhead Trail (Highway 16) to the south. Its southwestern boundary is formed by portions of a Canadian National (CN) rail line, Fort Road, 50 Street and 144 Avenue.[1]

Casselman-Steele Heights[edit]

The majority of Casselman-Steele Heights is located in the southwest portion of Edmonton's northeast sector.[1][18] The area is bounded by 66 Street to the west, 153 Avenue to the north, a Canadian National rail line to the east and 137 Avenue to the south.[17] The portion of the area south of 144 Avenue and west of 50 Street, the York neighbourhood,[4] is located outside the northeast sector in the adjacent mature area sector.[1] The following four neighbourhoods comprise the northeast sector portion of Casselman-Steele Heights.[4]

Clareview[edit]

Main article: Clareview, Edmonton

Clareview is located in the south-central portion of Edmonton's northeast sector.[1] The area is generally bounded by a Canadian National rail line to the west, a power line right-of-way to the north of 153 Avenue to the north, the North Saskatchewan River valley and 18 Street to the east, and 130 Avenue and the Kennedale Ravine to the south.[21] The following eight neighbourhoods comprise Clareview.[4]

Hermitage[edit]

Main article: Hermitage, Edmonton

Hermitage is located in the southern portion of Edmonton's northeast sector.[1][18] The area is bounded by 50 Street to the west, 130 Avenue and the Kennedale Ravine to the north, the North Saskatchewan River valley to the east and Yellowhead Trail (Highway 16) and a Canadian National rail line to the south.[22] The following three neighbourhoods comprise Hermitage.[4]

Horse Hill[edit]

Main article: Horse Hill, Edmonton

Pilot Sound[edit]

Main article: Pilot Sound, Edmonton

Pilot Sound is located in the north-central portion of Edmonton's northeast sector.[1] The area is bounded by 66 Street to the west, Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the north and northeast and 153 Avenue to the south.[23] The following six neighbourhoods comprise Pilot Sound.[4]

Northwest sector[edit]

Edmonton's suburban northwest sector is generally bounded by 111 Avenue and Mayfield Road to the southeast, Stony Plain Road (Highway 16A) to the south, 231 Street (Parkland County) to the west, and Big Lake (Sturgeon County) and the City of St. Albert to the north. Its eastern boundary is formed by portions of 142 Street, a Canadian National (CN) rail line, Mark Messier Trail (Highway 2) and Yellowhead Trail (Highway 16).[1]

Big Lake[edit]

Main article: Big Lake, Edmonton

Big Lake is located in the northwest portion of Edmonton's northwest sector.[1] The area is bounded by 231 Street to the west, Big Lake to the northwest, 137 Avenue to the northeast, Ray Gibbon Drive and Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the east, and Yellowhead Trail (Highway 16) to the south, excluding the Big Lake Estates country residential subdivision located at the northeast corner of Yellowhead Trail and 231 Street.[24] The following five neighbourhoods comprise Big Lake.[4][24]

Other areas[edit]

Westview Village is a residential neighbourhood within Edmonton's northwest sector that is not within a larger residential area.[4]

Southeast sector[edit]

Edmonton's suburban southeast sector is generally bounded by 34 Street and Sherwood Park Freeway (Highway 100) to the northeast, Anthony Henday Drive (Strathcona County) to the east, 41 Avenue SW (Leduc County) to the south, Gateway Boulevard (Highway 2) to the west, and 63 Avenue/Argyll Road to the northwest. Its northern boundary is formed by portions of 75 Street, 76 Avenue, 71 Street, 82 Avenue, 50 Street and 101 Avenue.[1]

Ellerslie[edit]

Ellerslie is located in the southwest portion of Edmonton's southeast sector.[1] The area is bounded by Gateway Boulevard (Highway 2) to the west, Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the north, 66 Street to the east and 41 Avenue SW to the south.[25] The following five neighbourhoods comprise Ellerslie.[4]

The Meadows[edit]

Main article: The Meadows, Edmonton

The Meadows is located in the eastern portion of Edmonton's southeast sector.[1] The area is bounded by 34 Street to the west, Whitemud Drive to the north and Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the east and south.[26] The following seven neighbourhoods comprise The Meadows.[4]

Mill Woods[edit]

Main article: Mill Woods, Edmonton

Mill Woods is located in the central portion of Edmonton's southeast sector.[1] The area is bounded by 91 Street to the west, Whitemud Drive to the north, 34 Street to the east and Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the south.[27] Excluding the recreational neighbourhoods of Mill Woods Golf Course and Mill Woods Park, Mill Woods includes the following 24 neighbourhoods clustered within 9 communities.[4][27][28]

Southeast Edmonton[edit]

Main article: Southeast Edmonton

Southeast Edmonton is located in the southern portion of Edmonton's southeast sector.[1] The area is bounded by 66 Street to the west, Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the north, 50 Street to the east and 41 Avenue SW to the south.[35] The following three neighbourhoods comprise Southeast Edmonton.[4]

Other areas[edit]

Other neighbourhoods within Edmonton's southeast sector not within larger residential areas include Maple Ridge, Rural South East and South Edmonton Common.[4]

Southwest sector[edit]

Edmonton's suburban southwest sector is generally bounded by the southern extent of the Westbrook Estates neighbourhood, 119 Street and 34 Avenue to the northeast, Calgary Trail/Gateway Boulevard (Highway 2) to the east, 41 Avenue SW (Leduc County) to the south, and the North Saskatchewan River to the west and northwest. Its northern boundary is formed by portions of the south bank of the North Saskatchewan River valley and the east bank of the Whitemud Creek ravine.[1]

Heritage Valley[edit]

Heritage Valley is located in the southeast portion of Edmonton's southwest sector.[1] The area is bounded by Whitemud Creek to the west, Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the north, Calgary Trail to the east, and 41 Avenue SW to the south,[36] excluding the Blackburne neighbourhood located at the southwest corner of Anthony Henday Drive and Calgary Trail.[18] The following 15 neighbourhoods comprise Heritage Valley.[4]

Kaskitayo[edit]

Main article: Kaskitayo, Edmonton

Kaskitayo is located in the east portion of Edmonton's southwest sector.[1][18] The area is bounded by Whitemud Creek to the west, 34 Avenue to the north, Calgary Trail to the east, and Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the south, excluding the Westbrook Estates neighbourhood located west of 119 Street and north of a power line right-of-way at approximately 30 Avenue.[37] The following nine neighbourhoods comprise Kaskitayo.[4]

Riverbend[edit]

Main article: Riverbend, Edmonton

Riverbend is located in the northwest portion of Edmonton's southwest sector.[1][38] The area is bounded by the North Saskatchewan River valley to the west and north, Whitemud Creek to the east and a power line right-of-way at approximately 30 Avenue to the south.[38] The following nine neighbourhoods comprise Riverbend.[4]

Terwillegar Heights[edit]

Terwillegar Heights is located in the west portion of Edmonton's southwest sector.[1] The area is bounded by the North Saskatchewan River valley to the west, a power line right-of-way at approximately 30 Avenue to the north, Whitemud Creek to the east and Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the south.[39] The following seven neighbourhoods comprise Terwillegar Heights.[4]

Windermere[edit]

Windermere is located in the southwest portion of Edmonton's southwest sector.[1] The area is bounded by the North Saskatchewan River valley to the west, Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the north, Whitemud Creek to the east and 41 Avenue SW to the south.[40] The following six neighbourhoods comprise Windermere.[4]

Other areas[edit]

Blackburne is the lone residential neighbourhood within Edmonton's southwest sector not within a larger residential area.[4]

West sector[edit]

Edmonton's suburban west sector is bounded by Stony Plain Road (Highway 16A) to the north, 170 Street, the Patricia Ravine and the North Saskatchewan River to the east, and 33 Avenue SW to the south. Its western boundary is formed by 215 Street (Winterburn Road) and 231 Street to the south and north of Whitemud Drive respectively.[1]

The Grange[edit]

Main article: The Grange, Edmonton

The Grange is located in the west-central portion of Edmonton's west sector.[1] The area is bounded by 215 Street (Winterburn Road) to the west, Whitemud Drive to the north, Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the east and a combination of 45 Avenue and Lessard Road to the south.[41] The following three neighbourhoods comprise The Grange.[4]

Lewis Farms[edit]

Main article: Lewis Farms, Edmonton

Lewis Farms is located in the northwest portion of Edmonton's west sector.[1] The area is bounded by 231 Street to the west, Stony Plain Road (Highway 16A) to the north, Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the east and Whitemud Drive to the south.[42] The following seven neighbourhoods comprise Lewis Farms.[4]

Riverview[edit]

Main article: Riverview, Edmonton

West Jasper Place[edit]

West Jasper Place is located in the east portion of Edmonton's west sector.[1][18] The area is bounded by Anthony Henday Drive (Highway 216) to the west, 100 Avenue to the north, 170 Street to the east and the North Saskatchewan River valley and ravine system to the southeast and south.[43] The following 17 neighbourhoods comprise West Jasper Place.[4]

Other areas[edit]

Other neighbourhoods within Edmonton's west sector not within larger residential areas include Cameron Heights, Edgemont, Place LaRue and Rural West.[1][4]

Industrial districts[edit]

Four distinct industrial districts are located within Edmonton – the Edmonton Energy and Technology Park, Northeast Industrial, Northwest Industrial and South Industrial.[44] The Northeast District, Northwest District and South District are each divided into smaller industrial neighbourhoods.[4][44]

Edmonton Energy and Technology Park[edit]

The Edmonton Energy and Technology Park (EETP) is located in the northern portion of Edmonton's northeast sector.[1][18] The EETP is bounded by Canadian Forces Base Edmonton to the west, Highway 37 to the north, 33 Street NE (Range Road 231) to the east, Manning Drive (Highway 15) to the southeast and Anthony Henday Drive to the south.[18] The EETP forms part of Alberta's Industrial Heartland.[45] The EETP is wholly within Edmonton's Rural North East North Sturgeon neighbourhood and is not yet divided into smaller industrial neighbourhoods.[4][18]

Northeast Industrial[edit]

Industrial neighbourhoods within Edmonton's Northeast Industrial District include the following,[4][46] with their relevant city sector indicated in parentheses.[1]

The Northeast Industrial District specializes in the food and beverage industries.[46]

Northwest Industrial[edit]

Industrial neighbourhoods within Edmonton's Northwest Industrial District include the following,[4][46] with their relevant city sector indicated in parentheses.[1]

The Northwest Industrial District specializes in the transportation, warehousing and logistics industries.[46]

Southeast Industrial[edit]

Industrial neighbourhoods within Edmonton's South Industrial District, or Southeast Industrial District, include the following,[4][46] with their relevant city sector indicated in parentheses.[1]

The South Industrial District specializes in the machinery and equipment industries.[46]

River valley and ravine system[edit]

Northwest Industrial[edit]

North Saskatchewan River valley and ravine system neighbourhoods within Edmonton include the following,[4] with their relevant city sector indicated in parentheses.[1]

Transportation and utility corridor[edit]

Portions of Edmonton's transportation and utility corridor, which protects Anthony Henday Drive and adjacent lands for existing and future utilities,[49] have been split into their own neighbourhoods.[4] These neighbourhoods are as follows, with their relevant city sector indicated in parentheses.[1]

List[edit]

Note: * denotes a tie in rank

Business revitalization zones[edit]

A business revitalization zone (BRZ) is an area where an association, representing the business community within the area, works toward achieving common goal for the area, such as enhancing the area through various improvements, initiatives, programs, promotions and festivals to attract customers.[56] The authority for Edmonton to establish a BRZ is enabled by section 50 of the Municipal Government Act.[57] Some of Edmonton's BRZs share their name with neighbourhoods, but their boundaries do not coincide with those of the neighbourhoods.[4][58] Edmonton presently has 12 BRZs.[56]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao "Edmonton Developing and Planned Neighbourhoods, 2011". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-09-10. 
  2. ^ a b "Neighbourhoods (data plus kml file)". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-09-10. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "The Way We Grow: Municipal Development Plan Bylaw 15100". City of Edmonton. 2010-05-26. Retrieved 2012-09-20. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf "City of Edmonton Wards & Standard Neighbourhoods". City of Edmonton. Retrieved August 4, 2014. 
  5. ^ "City Councillors". City of Edmonton. Retrieved February 13, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b "Capital City Downtown Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. September 2010. Retrieved 2012-09-22. 
  7. ^ "Population History". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-11-24. 
  8. ^ a b c d e Provincial News Agency Ltd. (1958). New Map of the City of Edmonton, Jasper Place and Beverly (Revised 1958) (Map).
  9. ^ a b "Abbottsfield/Rundle Heights Community Development Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. March 2012. pp. 3 and 11. Retrieved February 20, 2013. 
  10. ^ Alexandra Zabjek (August 23, 2014). "‘Small town’ in the middle of Edmonton turns 100". Edmonton Journal (Postmedia Network). Retrieved August 24, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Extension of City Boundaries". Province of Alberta. 1912-07-18. Retrieved 2012-10-07. 
  12. ^ "Census History". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-10-07. 
  13. ^ "Establishment of the Village of North Edmonton". Province of Alberta. 1910-02-20. Retrieved 2012-10-07. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h City of Edmonton, Planning and Development Department. History of Annexations (Map).
  15. ^ "Chapter 23: An Act to consolidate and amend the Edmonton Charter". Government of Alberta. 1913-03-25. p. 4. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 
  16. ^ "Establishment of Villages". Government of Alberta. 1910-07-06. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 
  17. ^ a b c d e "Casselman-Steele Heights District Outline Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. August 2006. p. 6 of 47. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Plans in Effect". City of Edmonton. November 2011. Retrieved 2012-11-26. 
  19. ^ "Edmonton North Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. September 2010. Retrieved 2012-05-13. 
  20. ^ "Palisades Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. September 2011. Retrieved 2012-05-13. 
  21. ^ "Clareview Outline Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. December 2006. Retrieved 2012-05-13. 
  22. ^ "Hermitage General Outline Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. September 2006. Retrieved 2012-05-13. 
  23. ^ "Pilot Sound Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. November 2011. Retrieved 2012-05-13. 
  24. ^ a b "Big Lake Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. September 2012. Retrieved 2012-05-12. 
  25. ^ "Ellerslie Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. May 2011. Retrieved 2012-05-13. 
  26. ^ "The Meadows Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation June 2010)". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2011-02-11. 
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Mill Woods Development Concept". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2011-02-11. 
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Map 13. EFCL District L". City of Edmonton. 2009-03-09. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 
  29. ^ "Tawa Neighbourhood Profile". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 
  30. ^ "Mill Woods Town Centre Neighbourhood Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. December 2006. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 
  31. ^ "Lee Ridge Neighbourhood Profile". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 
  32. ^ "Michaels Park Neighbourhood Profile". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 
  33. ^ "Richfield Neighbourhood Profile". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 
  34. ^ "Tweddle Place Neighbourhood Profile". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 
  35. ^ "Southeast Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. May 2009. Retrieved 2012-05-13. 
  36. ^ "Heritage Valley Servicing Concept Design Brief (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. August 2011. Retrieved 2012-05-14. 
  37. ^ "Kaskitayo Outline Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. August 2010. Retrieved 2012-05-14. 
  38. ^ a b "Riverbend Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. December 2006. Retrieved 2012-05-14. 
  39. ^ "Terwillegar Heights Servicing Concept Design Brief (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. December 2006. Retrieved 2012-05-14. 
  40. ^ "Windermere Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. February 2012. Retrieved 2012-05-14. 
  41. ^ "The Grange Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. April 2011. Retrieved 2012-05-13. 
  42. ^ "Lewis Farms Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. October 2011. Retrieved 2012-05-13. 
  43. ^ "West Jasper Place Outline Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. June 2006. Retrieved 2012-05-13. 
  44. ^ a b "Edmonton's Industrial Neighbourhoods". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-12-01. 
  45. ^ "Alberta's Heartland Facilities". Alberta's Industrial Heartland. 2012-09-13. Retrieved 2012-11-26. 
  46. ^ a b c d e f "Industrial Land Supply and Demand". City of Edmonton. 2002. Retrieved 2012-12-01. 
  47. ^ "Clover Bar Area (Aurum)". City of Edmonton. October 2012. Retrieved 2012-12-01. 
  48. ^ "Aurum Industrial Business Park Area Structure Plan (Office Consolidation)". City of Edmonton. May 2009. Retrieved 2012-12-01. 
  49. ^ "Transportation Utilities Corridor: Introduction". Alberta Infrastructure. Retrieved 2012-12-01. 
  50. ^ a b "2012 Census - Population By Single Year Of Age And Gender (Neighbourhood)". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-09-10. 
  51. ^ "City of Edmonton Plans in Effect". City of Edmonton. November 2011. Retrieved 2012-09-10. 
  52. ^ "City of Edmonton Industrial Land Demand and Supply". City of Edmonton. 2002. Retrieved 2012-09-20. 
  53. ^ "2009 Census - Population By Single Year Of Age And Gender (Neighbourhood)". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-09-10. 
  54. ^ "2012 Census - Dwelling Unit By Structure Type (Neighbourhood)". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-09-10. 
  55. ^ a b c d "UDI Edmonton Newsletter, Issue 4". The Urban Development Institute, Greater Edmonton Chapter. May 2012. Retrieved 2012-09-10. 
  56. ^ a b "Business Revitalization Zones". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 
  57. ^ "Municipal Government Act, Revised Statutes of Alberta 2000, Chapter M-26". Alberta Queen's Printer. 2010-11-24. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 
  58. ^ "Business Revitalization Zones (map)". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2012-12-04. 

External links[edit]