Little Silver, New Jersey

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Little Silver, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Little Silver
Map of Little Silver in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Little Silver in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Little Silver, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Little Silver, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°20′13″N 74°02′04″W / 40.336952°N 74.034535°W / 40.336952; -74.034535Coordinates: 40°20′13″N 74°02′04″W / 40.336952°N 74.034535°W / 40.336952; -74.034535[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated April 28, 1923
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Robert Neff, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator/Clerk Helen Gormley[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 3.315 sq mi (8.586 km2)
 • Land 2.708 sq mi (7.013 km2)
 • Water 0.607 sq mi (1.573 km2)  18.32%
Area rank 321st of 566 in state
22nd of 53 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 16 ft (5 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 5,950
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 5,906
 • Rank 347th of 566 in state
28th of 53 in county[11]
 • Density 2,197.3/sq mi (848.4/km2)
 • Density rank 274th of 566 in state
32nd of 53 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07739[12][13]
Area code(s) 732[14]
FIPS code 3402540770[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885282[1][17]
Website www.littlesilver.org
Canada Geese cross street in Little Silver, New Jersey

Little Silver is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 5,950,[7][8][9] a drop of 220 (-3.6%) from the 6,170 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 449 (+7.8%) from the 5,721 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Little Silver was established with a King's land grant in 1663 and settled in 1667.[19] Little Silver was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 19, 1923, from portions of Shrewsbury Township, based on the results of a referendum held on April 28, 1923.[20]

Geography[edit]

Little Silver is located at 40°20′13″N 74°02′04″W / 40.336952°N 74.034535°W / 40.336952; -74.034535 (40.336952,-74.034535). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 3.315 square miles (8.586 km2), of which, 2.708 square miles (7.013 km2) of it is land and 0.607 square miles (1.573 km2) of it (18.32%) is water.[1][2]

The original farms and nurseries have almost all been replaced by housing today. Little Silver's location on the Shrewsbury River makes it a popular destination for boaters and water sports enthusiasts, with a public boat ramp at the Dominick F. Santelle Park off Riverview Avenue. Approximately 8% of the homes are directly on the Shrewsbury River and another third of homes are on streams that connect to it.[21]

History[edit]

Prior to the settlement of Europeans, the area that is now Little Silver was inhabited by the Navesink Native Americans.

There are several tales of how Little Silver received its name. In one, brothers Joseph and Peter Parker, who settled in this area in 1667 and owned land bounded by Parker's Creek on the south and Little Silver Creek on the north, named their holdings "Little Silver" after their father's (George Parker) estate in Portsmouth, Rhode Island.[19] This in turn can be traced overseas to Little Silver, a village in Devonshire, England. The original Parker Homestead was acquired by the borough and undergoing renovation.

The borough's earliest European residents were primarily farmers, fishermen and merchants.

Early families and businesses include:

  • Parkers - Joseph and Peter Parker originally settled the area, and their original homestead at 235 Rumson Road has been declared a state historic site.
  • Sickles - Harold and Elsie Sickles acquired land and opened a wholesale truck farm in 1908. The land was acquired from Harold's mother who was related to the Parkers. Transitioning from seasonal to year-round in 1998, Sickles Market is today a successful specialty garden and food market.

John T. Lovett owned a nursery that once covered almost half the borough, supplying large catalog houses such as Sears Roebuck, Macy's and Newberry's. In 1878 he circulated a petition to the community recommending that that the name be revised and on July 30, 1879, the Post Office name was changed from "Parkersville" to "Little Silver".[22]

The borough has had a varied history as a resort, agricultural area and fishing town. Today, the municipality is primarily residential with a range of housing types, from ranches and capes.

Little Silver separated from Shrewsbury Township in 1923. Farms and nurseries have been replaced by housing today. Over the years, New York City and North Jersey commuters have decided to make Little Silver their home, traveling by rail or auto to their jobs. The Little Silver Train Station on Sycamore Avenue was designed by the noted American architect Henry Hobson Richardson and built in 1890. It reopened after renovations in 2003.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 1,109
1940 1,461 31.7%
1950 2,595 77.6%
1960 5,202 100.5%
1970 6,010 15.5%
1980 5,548 −7.7%
1990 5,721 3.1%
2000 6,170 7.8%
2010 5,950 −3.6%
Est. 2013 5,906 [10] −0.7%
Population sources:1930[23]
1930-1990[24] 2000[25][26] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 5,950 people, 2,146 households, and 1,689 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,197.3 per square mile (848.4 /km2). There were 2,278 housing units at an average density of 841.3 per square mile (324.8 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 96.42% (5,737) White, 0.29% (17) Black or African American, 0.10% (6) Native American, 1.75% (104) Asian, 0.13% (8) Pacific Islander, 0.17% (10) from other races, and 1.14% (68) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.01% (179) of the population.[7]

There were 2,146 households, of which 37.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.4% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.3% were non-families. 18.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.18.[7]

In the borough, 27.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 19.0% from 25 to 44, 32.3% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.8 years. For every 100 females there were 92.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.4 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $144,299 (with a margin of error of +/- $23,666) and the median family income was $167,659 (+/- $28,090). Males had a median income of $126,556 (+/- $27,434) versus $71,667 (+/- $13,832) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $66,069 (+/- $8,285). About 1.7% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.7% of those under age 18 and 1.7% of those age 65 or over.[27]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census,[15] there were 6,170 people, 2,232 households, and 1,810 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,226.2 people per square mile (860.0/km2). There were 2,288 housing units at an average density of 825.5 per square mile (318.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.15% White, 0.31% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.51% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.19% from other races, and 0.66% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.31% of the population.[25][26]

There were 2,232 households out of which 37.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.5% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.9% were non-families. 16.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.13.[25][26]

In the borough the population was spread out with 27.4% under the age of 18, 4.2% from 18 to 24, 25.0% from 25 to 44, 27.7% from 45 to 64, and 15.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.0 males.[25][26]

The median income for a household in the borough was $94,094, and the median income for a family was $104,033. Males had a median income of $90,941 versus $45,938 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $46,798. About 0.4% of families and 0.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under age 18 and 0.8% of those age 65 or over.[25][26]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Little Silver is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Little Silver is Republican Robert Neff, Jr., whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Borough Council are Donald Galante (R, 2016), David E. Gilmour (R, 2015), Dane S. Mihlon (R, 2014), Daniel J. O'Hern (D, 2014), Richard J. Scott (R, 2015) and Stuart W. Van Winkle (R, 2016).[28][29][30][31][32][33]

In September 2011, following the death of mayor Suzanne Castleman in July 2011, Robert Neff was appointed to fill the vacant mayoral seat, while Donald Galante, a former member of the Borough Council, was appointed to fill Neff's vacant council seat.[34]

Little Silver is a participating municipality in an initiative to study regionalizing their municipal police force with one or more municipalities. The borough received a grant from the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs in the amount of $40,950 along with the Boroughs of Fair Haven, Oceanport, Shrewsbury and Rumson to hire professional consultants to conduct the study on their behalf. A report delivered in July 2008 recommended that Fair Haven, Little Silver and Rumson should consider a network of shared police services, with consideration of inclusion of Oceanport and Shrewsbury deferred to a second phase.[35]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Little Silver is located in the 4th Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 13th state legislative district.[8][37][38] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Little Silver had been in the 12th state legislative district.[39] Prior to the 2010 Census, Little Silver had been part of the 12th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[39]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[40] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[41][42] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[43][44]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 13th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph M. Kyrillos (R, Middletown Township) and in the General Assembly by Amy Handlin (R, Middletown Township) and Declan O'Scanlon (R, Little Silver).[45] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[46] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[47]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[48] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[49] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[50] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[51] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[52] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[53][54] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[55] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[56] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[57]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,677 registered voters in Little Silver, of which 1,065 (22.8%) were registered as Democrats, 1,486 (31.8%) were registered as Republicans and 2,124 (45.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[58]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 55.7% of the vote here (2,155 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 42.0% (1,625 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (41 votes), among the 3,867 ballots cast by the borough's 4,879 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.3%.[59] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 60.1% of the vote here (2,310 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 39.1% (1,501 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (19 votes), among the 3,842 ballots cast by the borough's 4,752 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 80.9.[60]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 67.5% of the vote here (1,865 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 25.9% (715 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.9% (163 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (12 votes), among the 2,761 ballots cast by the borough's 4,752 registered voters, yielding a 58.1% turnout.[61]

Education[edit]

The Little Silver School District serves students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 770 students and 70.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.91:1.[62] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[63]) are Point Road School[64] (grades PreK-4; 424 students) and Markham Place School[65] (5-8; 346).[66]

For ninth through twelfth grades, students attend Red Bank Regional High School, which primarily though not exclusively serves students from the boroughs of Little Silver, Red Bank and Shrewsbury.[67][68] Students from other Monmouth County municipalities are eligible to attend the high school for its performing arts program, with admission on a competitive basis.[69] The school had 1,161 students as of the 2011-12 school year.[70]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The borough had a total of 32.41 miles (52.16 km) of roadways, of which 25.68 miles (41.33 km) are maintained by the municipality and 6.73 miles (10.83 km) by Monmouth County.[71]

Both Route 35 and CR 520 clip the very western corner of the borough. The closest limited access road is the Garden State Parkway via CR 520 in Middletown Township.

Public transportation[edit]

Little Silver train station agent's window
NJT train at Little Silver train station
Borough of Little Silver vehicle

The Little Silver train station[72] is served by trains on New Jersey Transit's North Jersey Coast Line.[73][74] The station is one of the few on the electrified portion of the line without raised platforms. The station is located between two grade crossings. When trains stop at the station, they block the roadway at one crossing or the other for entire duration of the stop, causing traffic backups.

The train station, constructed in 1875 by the New York and Long Branch Railroad, was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.[75]

From the Raritan Bayshore SeaStreak catamarans travel to Pier 11 at Wall Street and East 34th Street Ferry Landing in Manhattan. NY Waterway ferries travel to Paulus Hook Ferry Terminal in Jersey City, Battery Park City Ferry Terminal and West Midtown Ferry Terminal in Manhattan.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Little Silver include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Directory, Borough of Little Silver. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 63.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Little Silver, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Little Silver borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Little Silver borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 5, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Little Silver, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Little Silver, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  19. ^ a b Goodnough, Abby. "If You're Thinking of Living in/Little Silver; Life on a Peninsula Near Sandy Hook", The New York Times, October 17, 1993. Accessed July 18, 2012. "Little Silver was settled in 1667 by Joseph and Peter Parker, who named their property for their father's Portsmouth, R.I., estate."
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 181. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  21. ^ Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Little Silver, N.J.; Riverfront Borough That Prizes Stability", The New York Times, September 2, 2001. Accessed August 6, 2012. "ACCORDING to Mayor Castleman, 8 percent of Little Silver's homes are on the Shrewsbury River and another 35 percent are along its stream corridors. From Seven Bridges Road, which spans the river and its tributaries in seven places, private docks are visible behind waterfront houses. For residents without private access to the river, the borough provides a boat ramp, at no cost, in Dominick F. Santelle Park off Riverview Avenue."
  22. ^ Staff. "Little Silver & Oceanport: A brief history", Asbury Park Press, February 20, 2003. Accessed December 5, 2012.
  23. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  24. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  25. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Little Silver borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Little Silver borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  27. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Little Silver borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 18, 2012.
  28. ^ Borough Council Member Biographies, Borough of Little Silver. Accessed September 1, 2014. Galante is not listed as of date accessed.
  29. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Little Silver. Accessed October 17, 2013.
  30. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 6, 2012, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 17, 2013.
  31. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 8, 2011, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 17, 2013.
  32. ^ Monmouth County General Election Results General Election November 2, 2010, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 17, 2013.
  33. ^ Staff. "Incumbents sweep local elections ", The Hub, November 14, 2013. Accessed September 1, 2014. "Little Silver Republican incumbents Stuart W. Van Winkle, who tallied 1,607 votes, and Donald Galante, who tallied 1,594 votes, ran unopposed for re-election to the Borough Council."
  34. ^ Dalton, Kristen. "Galante fills Little Silver council vacancy: Former councilman returns to fill unexpired term through 2012", The Hub, October 6, 2011. Accessed November 2, 2011. "Borough Council members appointed former Councilman Donald Galante to fill the remainder of the council term vacated by Robert Neff, who was appointed mayor to succeed Suzanne Castleman who passed away in July."
  35. ^ O'Donnell, Jenna. "Study recommends towns share police services; Consultants: Law enforcement can be regionalized", the hub, July 17, 2008. Accessed August 6, 2012. "A feasibility study of shared police services among Rumson, Fair Haven and Little Silver suggests that the three towns pool resources in six areas, including criminal investigation and communications.The findings of the Two River Regional Police Study Group by Eatontown-based Patriot Consulting Group were presented to officials and residents of the three boroughs during a meeting held at Little Silver Borough Hall on July 9.... The group was founded by the elected officials of the three towns, along with the boroughs of Oceanport and Shrewsbury, in 2007 for the purpose of assessing the feasibility of sharing and possibly regionalizing their five municipal police departments into on regional department, the release states.... O'Scanlon, a Little Silver councilman at the time, said then that the study would proceed with only Little Silver, Fair Haven and Rumson, but that Oceanport and Shrewsbury might join at a later date. "
  36. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  41. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  42. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  43. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  44. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 28, 2014.
  46. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ Monmouth County Government, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  49. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  50. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  51. ^ Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  52. ^ Freeholder John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  55. ^ About the County Clerk, M. Claire French, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  56. ^ Sheriff Shaun Golden, Monmouth County Sheriff's Office. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  57. ^ Monmouth County Surrogate, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  58. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Monmouth, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 4, 2012.
  59. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 4, 2012.
  60. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 4, 2012.
  61. ^ 2009 Governor: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 4, 2012.
  62. ^ District information for Little Silver School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 1, 2014.
  63. ^ Data for the Little Silver School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 1, 2014.
  64. ^ Point Road School, Little Silver School District. Accessed October 17, 2013.
  65. ^ Markham Place School, Little Silver School District. Accessed October 17, 2013.
  66. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Little Silver School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 1, 2014.
  67. ^ Red Bank Regional High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 1, 2014. "Red Bank Regional High School is a comprehensive and diverse secondary school that offers a multitude of rigorous academic and extra-curricular programs for the student body which numbers 1,200. The constituent sending districts include Little Silver, Red Bank Borough and Shrewsbury. "
  68. ^ Martin, Patti. "A Day in the Life of Red Bank Regional High School", Asbury Park Press, March 30, 2007. Accessed September 1, 2014. "Located in Little Silver, RBR, as the school is commonly referred to, is the home school to students from Little Silver, Red Bank and Shrewsbury."
  69. ^ Academy of Visual and Performing Arts Frequently Asked Questions, Red Bank Regional High School. Accessed September 1, 2014.
  70. ^ School Data for the Red Bank Regional High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 1, 2014.
  71. ^ Monmouth County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 24, 2014.
  72. ^ Little Silver, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 17, 2013.
  73. ^ North Jersey Coast Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 17, 2013.
  74. ^ Monmouth County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed August 6, 2012.
  75. ^ New Jersey - Monmouth County, National Register of Historic Places. Accessed August 6, 2012.
  76. ^ Schreuders, Piet. "The Paperback Art of James Avati", Illustration Magazine, October 2001, p. 16. Accessed July 14, 2011. "A large portion of Avati’s youth was spent in Little Silver, a small community in Monmouth County, New Jersey, near the Atlantic coast. Sadly, Avati’s father died suddenly of pneumonia in 1928. Luckily for the boy, he had a wealthy uncle who was willing to fund his college education at Princeton. In 1935, Avati graduated from there with a degree in Architecture."
  77. ^ Sullivan, Joseph F. "POLITICS; Parties Maneuver to Replace 2 Representatives", The New York Times, April 3, 1988. Accessed July 18, 2012. "Other Republican Assemblymen, including John O. Bennett of Little Silver and Joseph A. Palaia of Ocean Township, also have been mentioned."
  78. ^ Van Develde, Elaine. "A bicycle trip that leads to someone else’s home", Atlanticville, January 9, 2004. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Shariff, 20, of Tinton Falls, is an undergraduate studying electrical engineering at Princeton University. Brown, 19, also from Tinton Falls, is a physics major at Yale University, New Haven, Conn.; and Christian, a Little Silver native, attends Brown University, Providence, R.I., and majors in computer science and philosophy."
  79. ^ Schnitzspan, Karen L. Little Silver, p. 91. Arcadia Publishing, 1996. ISBN 0-7385-6358-7. Accessed July 14, 2011.
  80. ^ "KARL G. JANSKY, 44, AUTHORITY IN RADIO; Bell Laboratories Engineer Dies--Discovered Waves of Extraterrestrial Origin", The New York Times, February 15, 1950. Accessed June 3, 2008. "Karl Guthe Jansky of 57 Silverton Avenue, Little Silver, N.J., radio research engineer with the Bell Telephone Laboratories since 1928, who discovered radio waves of extraterrestrial origin in 1933 died yesterday in the Riverside Hospital, Red Bank, N.J., of a heart malady."
  81. ^ Assemblyman Morgan's Legislative Website, New Jersey Legislature from the Internet Archive, dated December 23, 2005. Accessed June 3, 2008.
  82. ^ "Justice O'Hern Celebrates 70th Birthday and Retirement from NJ Supreme Court", New Jersey Supreme Court press release. Accessed June 4, 2008. "Justice O'Hern and his wife Barbara live in Little Silver."
  83. ^ Assemblyman O'Scanlon's legislative web page, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed June 3, 2008.
  84. ^ "CHURCH TO BE STARTED; Ground to Be Broken Today for Edifice at Red Bank", The New York Times, March 30, 1952. Accessed June 3, 2008. "One of the speakers will be Attorney General Theodore D. Parsons of New Jersey, who lives in neighboring Little Silver."
  85. ^ via Associated Press. "Coburn, Rutgers overcome Monmouth 79-56", The Seattle Times, December 18, 2010. Accessed January 8, 2011. "There was a sense of familiarity to the night for Rice, who lives in nearby Little Silver, N.J., and is 2-0 at Monmouth's new Multipurpose Activities Center in less than a year."
  86. ^ Stern, Gary. "A music-loving restaurateur runs workshops designed to help aspiring songwriters find their voice", The Journal News, August 7, 2005. Accessed July 14, 2011. "Trooper, 50, is a native of Little Silver, N.J., next to Asbury Park."

Sources[edit]

  • Schnitzspahn, Karen L. Images of America: Little Silver, p. 106.

External links[edit]