Roosevelt, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the former Roosevelt in Middlesex County, see Carteret, New Jersey.
Roosevelt, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Roosevelt
Map of Roosevelt in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Roosevelt in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Roosevelt, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Roosevelt, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°13′15″N 74°28′13″W / 40.220742°N 74.470155°W / 40.220742; -74.470155Coordinates: 40°13′15″N 74°28′13″W / 40.220742°N 74.470155°W / 40.220742; -74.470155[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated May 29, 1937 as Jersey Homesteads
Renamed November 9, 1945 as Roosevelt
Government[4]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Elsbeth Battel (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
Area[1]
 • Total 1.920 sq mi (4.972 km2)
 • Land 1.910 sq mi (4.947 km2)
 • Water 0.010 sq mi (0.026 km2)  0.52%
Area rank 419th of 566 in state
32nd of 53 in county[1]
Elevation[5] 144 ft (44 m)
Population (2010 Census)[6][7][8]
 • Total 882
 • Estimate (2013)[9] 873
 • Rank 538th of 566 in state
49th of 53 in county[10]
 • Density 461.8/sq mi (178.3/km2)
 • Density rank 447th of 566 in state
50th of 53 in county[10]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08555[11][12]
Area code(s) 609[13]
FIPS code 3402564410[1][14][15]
GNIS feature ID 0885377[1][16]
Website www.web2sons.org

Roosevelt is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 882,[6][7][8] reflecting a decline of 51 (-5.5%) from the 933 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 49 (+5.5%) from the 884 counted in the 1990 Census.[17]

The borough was established as Jersey Homesteads by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on May 29, 1937, from portions of Millstone Township. The name was changed to Roosevelt as of November 9, 1945, based on the results of a referendum held three days earlier, in honor of Franklin D. Roosevelt, who had died on April 12, 1945.[18]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Roosevelt as its 12th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[19]

History[edit]

Jersey Homesteads Historic District
Jersey Homesteads Historic District.JPG
NRHP Reference # 83004053
NJRHP # 2052[20]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP December 5, 1983
Designated NJRHP October 14, 1983
Jersey Homesteads, late 1930s

Roosevelt was originally called Jersey Homesteads, and was created during the Great Depression as part of President Roosevelt's New Deal. The town was home to a cooperative farming and manufacturing project. The project fell under the discretion of the Resettlement Administration, but was conceived and largely planned out by Benjamin Brown.[21]

Farmland in Central Jersey was purchased by Jersey Homesteads, Inc., a corporation owned by the federal government but under control of a board of directors selected by Brown. Construction started around 1936. Soon after there were 200 homes and various public facilities in place. The economy of the town consisted of a garment factory and a farm.[21] Objectives of the community were to help residents escape poverty, to show that cooperative management can work, and as an experiment in government intervention.

Albert Einstein gave the town his political and moral support. Artist Ben Shahn lived in the town and painted a fresco mural viewable in the current Roosevelt Public School. The three panels show the history of the Jersey Homesteads, starting with the eastern European origins of its Jewish residents, their passage through Ellis Island and making plans for the community in Roosevelt.[21][22]

David Dubinsky and the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union opposed the project, arguing that the factory town would cause unions to lose their power over wages. Political opposition came from those who thought too much money was being spent on the project, as well as those opposed to the New Deal in general.

The Jersey Homesteads cooperative didn't last through World War II. It failed for a number of reasons.

Roosevelt is a historic landmark and is the subject of the 1983 documentary, Roosevelt, New Jersey: Visions of Utopia. The Jersey Homesteads Historic District was added to the New Jersey Register of Historic Places and to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983, including "all that area within the corporate boundaries of the Borough of Roosevelt".[23]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.920 square miles (4.972 km2), of which, 1.910 square miles (4.947 km2) of it was land and 0.010 square miles (0.026 km2) of it (0.52%) of it was water.[1][2]

Upper Freehold Township borders the borough on the southwest and Millstone Township on the north and east.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1940 698
1950 720 3.2%
1960 764 6.1%
1970 814 6.5%
1980 835 2.6%
1990 884 5.9%
2000 933 5.5%
2010 882 −5.5%
Est. 2013 873 [9][24] −1.0%
Population sources: 1940-1990[25]
2000[26][27] 2010[6][7][8]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 882 people, 314 households, and 241.2 families residing in the borough. The population density was 461.8 per square mile (178.3/km2). There were 327 housing units at an average density of 171.2 per square mile (66.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 92.52% (816) White, 0.91% (8) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 3.17% (28) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.93% (17) from other races, and 1.47% (13) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.90% (52) of the population.[6]

There were 314 households, of which 31.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.9% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.2% were non-families. 17.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.22.[6]

In the borough, 23.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 17.5% from 25 to 44, 37.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.8 years. For every 100 females there were 98.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.9 males.[6]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $81,000 (with a margin of error of +/- $13,354) and the median family income was $86,406 (+/- $11,892). Males had a median income of $48,571 (+/- $11,433) versus $40,909 (+/- $17,307) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $33,863 (+/- $6,772). About 4.7% of families and 8.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.4% of those under age 18 and 6.5% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 933 people, 337 households, and 258 families residing in the borough. The population density was 477.0 people per square mile (183.8/km2). There were 351 housing units at an average density of 179.4 per square mile (69.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 88.96% White, 2.57% African American, 2.04% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 2.25% from other races, and 4.07% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.50% of the population.[26][27]

There were 337 households out of which 39.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.1% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.4% were non-families. 18.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.17.[26][27]

In the borough the population was spread out with 27.8% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 27.5% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.7 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household in the borough was $61,979, and the median income for a family was $67,019. Males had a median income of $50,417 versus $38,229 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $24,892. About 3.9% of families and 4.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 18.4% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Roosevelt is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[4] The Borough form of government used by Roosevelt, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[29][30]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Roosevelt is Elsbeth "Beth" Battel (D, term ends December 31, 2015).[31] Members of the Roosevelt Borough Council are Thomas Curry (D, 2015), Jeff Ellentuck (D, 2014), Mike Hamilton (D, 2014), Stuart Kaufman (D, 2016), Peggy Malkin (D, 2016) and Michael L. Ticktin (D, 2015).[32][33][34][35]

In 2006, Roosevelt voters recalled Neil Marko, the Borough's mayor, by a vote of 262-38 in an effort initiated by the Committee to Recall Marko. Voters chose Beth Battel, then the Borough Council's president, to replace Marko as mayor.[36]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Roosevelt is located in the 4th Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 12th state legislative district.[7][38][39] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Roosevelt had been in the 30th state legislative district.[40]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[42][43] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[44][45]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 12th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Samuel D. Thompson (R, Old Bridge Township) and in the General Assembly by Robert D. Clifton (R, Matawan) and Ronald S. Dancer (R, Plumsted Township).[46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[49] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[50] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[51] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[52] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[53] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[54][55] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[56] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[57] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 608 registered voters in Roosevelt, of which 351 (57.7%) were registered as Democrats, 60 (9.9%) were registered as Republicans and 195 (32.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[59]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 69.3% of the vote here (354 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 26.8% (137 votes) and other candidates with 2.2% (11 votes), among the 511 ballots cast by the borough's 649 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.7%.[60] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 68.4% of the vote here (342 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 29.4% (147 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (9 votes), among the 500 ballots cast by the borough's 635 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 78.7.[61]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 58.0% of the vote here (215 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 34.0% (126 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.9% (22 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (4 votes), among the 371 ballots cast by the borough's 625 registered voters, yielding a 59.4% turnout.[62]

Education[edit]

The Roosevelt Public School District serves public school students in pre-Kindergarten through sixth grade at Roosevelt Public School. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 69 students and 9.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 7.34:1.[63]

For seventh through twelfth grades, public school students attend the East Windsor Regional School District, a comprehensive public school district serving students from East Windsor Township and Hightstown Borough, with students from Roosevelt attending as part of a sending/receiving relationship.[64]

Schools in the East Windsor district attended by Roosevelt students (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[65]) are Melvin H. Kreps Middle School[66] for grades 6 - 8 (but only 7-8 for Roosevelt) with 1,233 students and Hightstown High School[67] with 1,403 students in grades 9 - 12.[68][69]

From 2005 to 2010, a Jewish secondary and post-secondary religious school, Yeshiva Me'on Hatorah, was located in a local synagogue, Congregation Anshei Roosevelt. Due to unresolvable zoning issues for its dormitory and dining facilities, and local opposition to its presence, the yeshiva relocated to Monsey, New York after the yeshiva brought and lost several actions against the borough and certain individual borough officials in state and Federal courts.[70]

Transportation[edit]

As of 2010, the borough had a total of 8.43 miles (13.57 km) of roadways, of which 6.27 miles (10.09 km) were maintained by the municipality and 2.16 miles (3.48 km) by Monmouth County.[71]

The only major road that passes through is CR 571 in the center of the borough.[72]

Interstate 195 is accessible in both of its neighboring towns and Interstate 95 (the New Jersey Turnpike) is also nearby.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Roosevelt include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 135.
  5. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Roosevelt, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 11, 2013.
  6. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Roosevelt borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  7. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 7. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Roosevelt borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  9. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  10. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  11. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Roosevelt, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  12. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Rockaway, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  14. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  16. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  18. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 184 re Roosevelt, p. 180 re Jersey Homesteads. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  19. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  20. ^ "New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places - Monmouth County". NJ DEP - Historic Preservation Office. March 1, 2011. p. 12. Retrieved April 26, 2011. 
  21. ^ a b c History Of Roosevelt, New Jersey, Rutgers University Library, accessed April 11, 2007.
  22. ^ Jonas, Gerald; Meehan, Thomas; and Whiteside, Thomas. "In Homage", The New Yorker, September 29, 1962. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  23. ^ New Jersey - Monmouth County, National Register of Historic Places. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  24. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
  25. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed July 30, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Roosevelt borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Roosevelt borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 31, 2012.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Roosevelt borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  29. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed November 30, 2014.
  30. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 6. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed December 1, 2014.
  31. ^ Boro Hall, Borough of Roosevelt. Accessed November 1, 2014. Web site does not list council members as of date accessed.
  32. ^ Monmouth County Directory 2014, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed November 1, 2014.
  33. ^ Official Election Results - General Election November 5, 2013, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed November 1, 2014.
  34. ^ Official Election Results - General Election November 6, 2012, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2013.
  35. ^ Official Election Results - General Election November 8, 2011, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed May 1, 2013.
  36. ^ Meggitt, Jane. "Recall voters give Marko the boot; New mayor, Beth Battel, says she will focus on water system, parking and school", Examiner, February 16, 2006. Accessed May 1, 2013. "An overwhelming majority of voters recalled Mayor Neil Marko in a special election held on Feb. 7. During the recall election, 282 residents voted to remove Marko from office, while 68 residents wanted him to stay."
  37. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 64, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  42. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  44. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  45. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  46. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 27, 2014.
  47. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ Monmouth County Government, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  50. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  51. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  52. ^ Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  53. ^ Freeholder John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  56. ^ About the County Clerk, M. Claire French, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  57. ^ Sheriff Shaun Golden, Monmouth County Sheriff's Office. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  58. ^ Monmouth County Surrogate, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  59. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Monmouth, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  60. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  61. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  62. ^ 2009 Governor: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 6, 2012.
  63. ^ District information for Roosevelt School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 24, 2014.
  64. ^ East Windsor Regional School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 1, 2014. "The East Windsor Regional School District, located in central New Jersey at New Jersey Turnpike Exit 8, is a stable K-12 public school district serving the communities of the East Windsor Township and the Borough of Hightstown as well as Roosevelt Borough students’ grades 7 through 12."
  65. ^ School Data for the East Windsor Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 1, 2014.
  66. ^ Melvin H. Kreps Middle School, East Windsor Regional School District. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  67. ^ Hightstown High School, East Windsor Regional School District. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  68. ^ Schools, East Windsor Regional School District. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  69. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the East Windsor Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  70. ^ Schneider, Yossi. Yeshiva Me’on Hatorah Forced Out of Roosevelt, Matzav.com, February 2, 2011. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  71. ^ Monmouth County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  72. ^ County Route 511 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, July 2006. Accessed November 4, 2013.
  73. ^ Jamieson, Wendell. "CITY LORE; Hard-Boiled Tales, Told by a Gentleman", The New York Times, January 1, 2006. Accessed July 31, 2012. "BENJAMIN APPEL was an author of more than 25 novels from 1934 to 1977, many of them set in New York. He was raised in Hell's Kitchen in Manhattan and lived much of his life in Roosevelt, N.J., but after he moved he still came back to New York often."
  74. ^ a b Staff. "History Of Roosevelt, New Jersey", Rutgers University Libraries. Accessed February 14, 2011.
  75. ^ Staff. "Rev. J. S. Grauel, 68, A Supporter of Israel", The New York Times, September 10, 1986. Accessed February 14, 2011. "The Rev. John Stanley Grauel, a Methodist minister who was an activist for the Jewish people and Israel, died Friday at his home in Roosevelt, N.J."
  76. ^ Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Roosevelt, N.J.; A New Deal Enclave Friendly to the Arts", The New York Times, February 3, 2002. Accessed July 28, 2009.
  77. ^ Staff. "Research Team from Corning Incorporated Earn Nation’s Highest Honor for Accomplishments", University of Utah press release, March 14, 2005. Accessed February 14, 2011. "Irwin M. Lachman was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1930, but raised in Roosevelt, New Jersey. He graduated in 1948 from Upper Freehold Township High School, now called Allentown High School."
  78. ^ Jacob Landau (1917-2001), Art & Architecture of New Jersey, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. Accessed July 31, 2012. "Jacob Landau, a resident of Roosevelt, New Jersey in his later years, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 17, 1917."
  79. ^ Staff. Gregorio Prestopino (1907-1984), Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. Accessed February 14, 2011. "In 1949 the artist and his family moved to Roosevelt, New Jersey, a town known for its artist-residents."
  80. ^ Staff. "Roosevelt featured in new exhibit", Allentown Examiner, August 27, 2009. Accessed February 14, 2011. "On Oct. 7, photo-historian and Monmouth County Archivist Gary Saretzky will give a lecture on the late Edwin and Louise Rosskam, who lived in Roosevelt for many years."
  81. ^ Hyman, Vicki. "Family of storied N.J. artist Ben Shahn to sell home, personal collection", The Star-Ledger, November 13, 2010. Accessed July 31, 2012. "It has been 41 years since the death of celebrated social realist painter Ben Shahn, and six years since his wife, Bernarda, an illustrator and painter, died in her sleep at their longtime home in Roosevelt."
  82. ^ Fox, Margalit. "Bernarda Bryson Shahn, Painter, Dies at 101", The New York Times, December 16, 2004. Accessed February 14, 2011. "Bernarda Bryson Shahn, the widow of the painter Ben Shahn, who won her own recognition as an artist late in life, died on Sunday at her home in Roosevelt, N.J., her son, Jonathan Shahn, said. She was 101."
  83. ^ Jonathan Shahn (b. 1938), Art & Architecture of New Jersey, Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. Accessed July 31, 2012. "He lives and works in Roosevelt, New Jersey."
  84. ^ "Authors In Issue Three", Tiferet (magazine). Accessed November 11, 2008.

External links[edit]