Spring Lake, New Jersey

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Spring Lake, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Spring Lake
Spring Lake in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Spring Lake in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Spring Lake, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Spring Lake, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°09′11″N 74°01′41″W / 40.153°N 74.028°W / 40.153; -74.028Coordinates: 40°09′11″N 74°01′41″W / 40.153°N 74.028°W / 40.153; -74.028[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated March 14, 1892
Government[7]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Jennifer Naughton (D, term ends December 31, 2015)[3][4]
 • Administrator W. Bryan Dempsey[5]
 • Clerk Jane L. Gillespie[6]
Area[1]
 • Total 1.728 sq mi (4.475 km2)
 • Land 1.330 sq mi (3.444 km2)
 • Water 0.398 sq mi (1.031 km2)  23.04%
Area rank 428th of 566 in state
34th of 53 in county[1]
Elevation[8] 16 ft (5 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 2,993
 • Estimate (2013)[12] 3,001
 • Rank 453rd of 566 in state
40th of 53 in county[13]
 • Density 2,250.8/sq mi (869.0/km2)
 • Density rank 271st of 566 in state
31st of 53 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07762[14][15]
Area code(s) 732 exchanges: 282, 449, 974[16]
FIPS code 3402570110[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885406[1][19]
Website www.springlakeboro.org

Spring Lake is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 2,993,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 574 (-16.1%) from the 3,567 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 68 (+1.9%) from the 3,499 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Spring Lake as the 240th best place to live in New Jersey in its 2010 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[21]

History[edit]

Spring Lake was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 14, 1892, from portions of Wall Township, based on the results of a referendum held on March 8, 1892. On February 24, 1903, the borough of North Spring Lake was annexed to Spring lake.[22]

During the "Gilded Age" of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Spring Lake developed into a coastal resort for members of New York City and Philadelphia high society, in similar fashion to the settlements of Newport, Rhode Island and Bar Harbor, Maine.[23] A surviving example of architecture constructed during this era is the Martin Maloney Cottage on Morris Avenue next to the tycoon's former and no longer existent Ballingarry Estate.[24] Another fine example of period architecture listed on the National Register of Historic Places is the Audenried Cottage on Tuttle Avenue.[25]

The second of the five victims of the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916, Charles Bruder, 27, a Swiss bellhop for the Essex and Sussex Hotel, was killed on July 6, 1916, while swimming approximately 130 yards (120 m) from shore in Spring Lake.[26] The wave of attacks took place between July 1 and July 12, 1916, along 80 miles (130 km) of Atlantic Ocean coastline and inspired the novel Jaws by Peter Benchley and corresponding film by Steven Spielberg.[27]

The borough and its environs are known as the "Irish Riviera" because of the large Irish-American population in the area, with Spring Lake having the highest percentage of any municipality in the United States.[28][29]

Spring Lake is home to the Spring Lake 5 Mile Run, a race that was first run in 1977, circling the borough, beginning and ending at the beachfront.[30] The 1999 event drew 15,000 runners.[31]

Geography[edit]

A group of seagulls move around on Spring Lake's beachfront in the vicinity of a pipe.
A view of the Spring Lake beach, boardwalk, dunes, and oceanfront homes

Spring Lake is located at 40°09′10″N 74°01′38″W / 40.15275°N 74.027171°W / 40.15275; -74.027171 (40.15275,-74.027171). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.728 square miles (4.475 km2), of which, 1.330 square miles (3.444 km2) of it was land and 0.398 square miles (1.031 km2) of it (23.04%) of it was water.[1][2]

Wreck Pond is a tidal pond located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by Wall Township and the boroughs of Spring Lake, Spring Lake Heights, and Sea Girt, covering an area of 28 acres (11 ha). The Wreck Pond watershed covers about 12 square miles (31 km2) in eastern Monmouth County.[32]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 526
1910 853 62.2%
1920 1,009 18.3%
1930 1,745 72.9%
1940 1,650 −5.4%
1950 2,008 21.7%
1960 2,922 45.5%
1970 3,896 33.3%
1980 4,215 8.2%
1990 3,499 −17.0%
2000 3,567 1.9%
2010 2,993 −16.1%
Est. 2013 3,001 [12][33] 0.3%
Population sources: 1900-1920[34]
1900-1910[35] 1910-1930[36]
1930-1990[37] 2000[38][39] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,993 people, 1,253 households, and 829.5 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,250.8 per square mile (869.0/km2). There were 2,048 housing units at an average density of 1,540.2 per square mile (594.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.63% (2,922) White, 0.27% (8) Black or African American, 0.03% (1) Native American, 1.00% (30) Asian, 0.03% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.50% (15) from other races, and 0.53% (16) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 1.90% (57) of the population.[9]

There were 1,253 households, of which 22.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.8% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.8% were non-families. 31.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 19.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.01.[9]

In the borough, 21.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 12.2% from 25 to 44, 33.2% from 45 to 64, and 27.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 51.9 years. For every 100 females there were 89.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.9 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $97,885 (with a margin of error of +/- $16,792) and the median family income was $150,156 (+/- $39,466). Males had a median income of $106,853 (+/- $30,491) versus $68,750 (+/- $15,695) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $71,661 (+/- $14,582). About 2.2% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 2.0% of those age 65 or over.[40]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 3,567 people, 1,463 households, and 983 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,723.8 people per square mile (1,051.3/km2). There were 1,930 housing units at an average density of 1,473.7 per square mile (568.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 98.77% White, 0.34% African American, 0.28% Asian, 0.11% from other races, and 0.50% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.73% of the population.[38][39]

There were 1,463 households out of which 23.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.8% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.8% were non-families. 29.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.03.[38][39]

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.8% under the age of 18, 4.5% from 18 to 24, 19.6% from 25 to 44, 28.9% from 45 to 64, and 25.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48 years. For every 100 females there were 86.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.2 males.[38][39]

As of 2008, the median income for a household in the borough was $115,709. Males had a median income of $88,924 versus $41,000 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $59,445. None of the families and 2.6% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 6.6% of those over 64.[38][39]

39.4% of Spring Lake residents identified as being of Irish American ancestry in the 2000 Census, the highest percentage of Irish Americans of any place in the United States.[29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Spring Lake is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Spring Lake, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[41]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Spring Lake is Democrat Jennifer Naughton, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2015. Members of the Spring Lake Borough Council are Council President Janice Venables (D, 2015), David Frost (R, 2016), William C. Fay, III (R, 2015), Paul Jordan (I, 2014), Brendan Judge (R, 2014) and Joe Erbe (R, 2016).[42][43][44][45][46][47]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Spring Lake is located in the 4th Congressional District[48] and is part of New Jersey's 30th state legislative district.[10][49][50] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Spring Lake had been in the 11th state legislative district.[51]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[52] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[53][54] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[55][56]

The 30th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert Singer (R, Lakewood Township) and in the General Assembly by Sean T. Kean (R, Wall Township) and Dave Rible (R, Wall Township).[57] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[58] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[59]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[60] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[61] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[62] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[63] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[64] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[65][66] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[67] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[68] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[69]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,520 registered voters in Spring Lake, of which 453 (18.0%) were registered as Democrats, 1,104 (43.8%) were registered as Republicans and 961 (38.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were two voters registered to other parties.[70]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 64.4% of the vote here (1,326 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 32.8% (676 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (20 votes), among the 2,059 ballots cast by the borough's 2,692 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.5%.[71] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 64.0% of the vote here (1,427 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 30.1% (670 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (30 votes), among the 2,229 ballots cast by the borough's 2,873 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 77.6.[72]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 68.8% of the vote here (1,144 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 23.3% (388 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.7% (95 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (11 votes), among the 1,663 ballots cast by the borough's 2,593 registered voters, yielding a 64.1% turnout.[73]

Education[edit]

The Spring Lake School District is a public school district that serves students in pre-school through eighth grade at H. W. Mountz School. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 269 students and 24.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.93:1.[74]

Students attending public high school for grades nine through twelve are assigned to Manasquan High School as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Manasquan Public Schools. Manasquan High School also serves students from Avon-by-the-Sea, Belmar, Brielle, Lake Como, Sea Girt and Spring Lake Heights who attend Manasquan High School as part of sending/receiving relationships with their respective districts.[75][76]

Students may also attend one of the magnet schools in the Monmouth County Vocational School DistrictMarine Academy of Science and Technology, Academy of Allied Health & Science, High Technology High School, Biotechnology High School, and Communications High School.[77][78]

Spring Lake students are also served by Saint Catharine School, a Catholic school that serves students in grades K-8 and operates under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Trenton.[79][80]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the borough had a total of 28.19 miles (45.37 km) of roadways, of which 26.06 miles (41.94 km) were maintained by the municipality and 2.13 miles (3.43 km) by Monmouth County.[81]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit offers train service at the Spring Lake station[82] on the North Jersey Coast Linevia Newark Penn Station to Secaucus Junction, Penn Station New York and Hoboken Terminal.[83]

NJ Transit bus service is available between the borough and Philadelphia on the 317 route, with local service offered on the 830 route.[84]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Spring Lake include:

Popular culture[edit]

Spring Lake is the setting for the Mary Higgins Clark novel On The Street Where You Live.[109] The opening scenes of Ulu Grosbard's 1968 film The Subject Was Roses were filmed in Spring Lake.[110][111] Indie rock band Vampire Weekend filmed a music video for their song "Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa" in a home in Spring Lake, as well as on the beach.[112] Spring Lake was used as a stand-in for turn-of-the-century Atlantic City, New Jersey, in the 1981 film Ragtime.[113]

In John Frankenheimer's 1962 film The Manchurian Candidate, the character of Major Bennett Marco (played by Frank Sinatra) suffers from a nightmare set in Spring Lake. He imagines himself and his fellow soldiers sitting through a lecture by Mrs. Henry Whitaker of the Spring Lake Garden Club. A sign reveals the location of the lecture to be the fictional "Spring Lake Hotel". Eventually, the audience sees that the garden club meeting is merely an illusion and the platoon is actually at a meeting of Russian and Chinese officials in Manchuria. The Mrs. Whitaker character is actually a Chinese scientist named Dr. Yen Lo, portrayed by Spring Lake native Khigh Dheigh.[114]

References[edit]

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  5. ^ Borough Administrator, Borough of Spring Lake. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  6. ^ Clerk and Registrar - Department Directory , Borough of Spring Lake. Accessed July 17, 2012.
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  23. ^ Corcoran, David. "All That Glitters", The New York Times, July 24, 2005. Accessed July 14, 2011. "Spring Lake... The town was founded in the Gilded Age and in certain ways has never left it."
  24. ^ Seebohn, Caroline; and Cook, Peter C. Cottages and mansions of the Jersey shore, p. 99. Rutgers University Press, 2007. ISBN 0-8135-4016-X. Accessed July 14, 2011. "One of the most spectacular examples of Spring Lake architecture is the so-called Maloney Cottage, at 101 Morris Avenue. Its wedding-cake opulence, fantastical porches and verandahs up steep flights of stairs, elaborate carpentry, curved balustrades, and dizzying rooflines cause people today to stop and stare. Brilliantly white, intricately decorated, the house represents the Gilded Age of Spring Lake at its most glamorous."
  25. ^ NEW JERSEY - Monmouth County, National Register of Historic Places. Accessed July 14, 2011.
  26. ^ Staff. "SHARK KILLS BATHER: Bites Off Both Legs Of Bellboy At Springlake, N. J.--Second Case In Week", The Baltimore Sun, July 7, 1916. Accessed July 14, 2011. "While hundreds of summer visitors on the beach and in the south end pavilion looked on helpless, Charles Bruder, a bellboy in one of the largest beach-front hotels, was attacked by a shark this afternoon and before help could arrive lost both his legs."
  27. ^ Staff. "The Shark That Inspired 'Jaws'", The Early Show, February 11, 2009. Accessed July 14, 2011. "Taking a dip in the ocean just hasn't been the same since the release of "Jaws" more than 25 years ago. But what many people don't know is that the film is based on a series of deadly shark attacks in the summer of 1916 along the New Jersey shoreline.... The second victim was a bellboy from Switzerland working at a hotel in Spring Lake. His name was Charles Bruder, and he was a very strong swimmer."
  28. ^ Warner, Susan. "Painting By The Numbers: What And Where Is Home?", The New York Times, July 14, 2002. Accessed August 30, 2013. "Spring Lake, New Jersey's so-called Irish Riviera, is indeed New Jersey's most Irish municipality. Just over half of Spring Lake's population, 50.7 percent, said it had roots in the auld sod."
  29. ^ a b Irish Ancestry by City, EPodunk. Accessed June 4, 2006.
  30. ^ History, Spring Lake Five Mie Run. Accessed July 17, 2012. "At first glance it may seem odd that a small town on the Jersey Shore would be home to one of the largest and best running events in the nation. Since it was first held in 1977, the Spring Lake Five Mile Run has grown from a small local fun run into New Jersey’s largest road race and a nationally recognized event. "
  31. ^ Harris, Courtenay. "15,000 expected for Spring Lake 5-Mile Run", Asbury Park Press, May 29, 1999. Accessed July 17, 2012.
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  62. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  63. ^ Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  64. ^ Freeholder John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  65. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  66. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  67. ^ About the County Clerk, M. Claire French, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
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  74. ^ District information for Spring Lake School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 26, 2014.
  75. ^ Sending districts, Manasquan Public Schools. Accessed July 30, 2012. "The district educates over 1700 students. Close to seven-hundred students attend our K-8 elementary school. Manasquan High School receives students from eight different districts; Avon, Bradley Beach, Brielle, Belmar, Lake Como, Sea Girt, Spring Lake, and Spring Lake Heights."
  76. ^ Manasquan Public Schools 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 27, 2014. "Manasquan High School receives students from seven sending districts; Avon Belmar, Brielle, Lake Como, Sea Girt, Spring Lake and Spring Lake Heights, as well as our Manasquan Elementary students."
  77. ^ Spring Lake Borough School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 30, 2013. "Students in grades 9 through 12 attend Manasquan High School, Wall Township Communications High School, The Academy of Allied Health and Science and various other private and parochial high schools."
  78. ^ Career Academy Admissions, Monmouth County Vocational School District. Accessed October 27, 2013.
  79. ^ Our History, Saint Catharine School. Accessed October 27, 2013.
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  84. ^ Monmouth County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  85. ^ "I Have a Lady in the Balcony", McFarland & Company. Accessed November 12, 2008. "George Ansbro was an announcer for the NBC and ABC networks for six decades. He worked in both the live radio era of big bands and soap operas and the television era, retiring from ABC in 1990. He lives in Spring Lake, New Jersey."
  86. ^ "The UnHamptons: 9 Jersey Shore", New York (magazine), May 28, 2001. Accessed August 1, 2011. "Spring Lake counts among its residents author Mary Higgins Clark, who set her latest novel here, as well as newscaster Jack Ford and Houston Astro Craig Biggio."
  87. ^ Tim Brower, Hawaii State Legislature. Accessed February 4, 2011. "He also lived in Belmar and Spring Lake on the New Jersey Shore as a child, where he attended grammar school and high school."
  88. ^ Williams, Carol Gorga. "Wrestler remembered as man who loved life Shore resident Christopher B. Candito, 33, died Thursday in hospital", Asbury Park Press, April 30, 2005. Accessed April 3, 2011. "Born in Edison, Candito, 33, had lived in Spring Lake until moving to Matawan 10 years ago. He attended H.W. Mountz Grammar School in Spring Lake..."
  89. ^ Stump, Scott. "Carmody struggles to overcome history", Asbury Park Press, December 18, 2005. "The former Spring Lake resident is no stranger to traveling long distances, considering Northwestern's roster has been heavily sprinkled with foreign players during his tenure."
  90. ^ Chung, Keanie. "Lessons from stonemason's precision give Carmody confidence to take wing", Chicago Sun-Times, November 16, 2000. Accessed August 14, 2012. "Carmody, 48, grew up in Spring Lake, NJ, a town on the Jersey shore, as the fifth of John and Marion Carmody's 11 children."
  91. ^ Staff. "Building at Spring Lake, N.J.", The New York Times, August 13, 1939. Accessed April 3, 2011. "Armino A. Campagna, New York builder, has started construction of a group of all-year homes on the former estate of the late Robert A. Chesebrough on Pitney Avenue Spring Lake N. J."
  92. ^ Meet the Writers: Mary Higgins Clark, accessed March 22, 2007. "They now live in Saddle River, New Jersey; they also have an apartment in Manhattan and summer homes in Spring Lake, New Jersey and Dennis, Massachusetts."
  93. ^ 13-Year-Old New Jersey Girl Wins Scripps National Spelling Bee, Scripps National Spelling Bee press release dated June 1, 2006.
  94. ^ Reilly, Michael. "Former Broadcaster DeRogatis Dies Of Cancer", St. Louis Post-Dispatch, December 28, 1995. Accessed August 3, 2007. "Mr. DeRogatis, who lived in Spring Lake, died of cancer at Jersey Shore Medical Center."
  95. ^ via Associated Press. "Khigh Dhiegh, 81", Telegram & Gazette, October 27, 1991. Accessed July 14, 2011. "He was born in Spring Lake, NJ, and lived most of his life in New York."
  96. ^ The UnHamptons: 9 Jersey Shore, New York (magazine), May 28, 2001. Accessed July 28, 2007. "Spring Lake counts among its residents author Mary Higgins Clark, who set her latest novel here, as well as newscaster Jack Ford and Houston Astro Craig Biggio."
  97. ^ Staff. "SAMUEL HEILNER, COAL MERCHANT; Retired Head of Philadelphia Company Founded Before Civil War Is Dead HELD RAIL DIRECTORATES Spring Lake, N. J., Resident for Many Years - Civic Leader, Member of State Boards", The New York Times, May 30, 1938. Accessed August 15, 2012. "SPRING LAKE, N. J., May 29. - Samuel Heilner, retired coal merchant, died at his Summer home, Seawood, here today. He was 82 years old."
  98. ^ Robertson, Nan. "New Face: Mary D'Arcy From Beauty Queen To Debut in 'Music Man'; Singing and Beauty Contests", The New York Times, July 27, 1979. Accessed July 14, 2011. "In college she also met Karl Jurman of Spring Lake, NJ, a pianist, and composer and now also her fiance."
  99. ^ via The New York Times, "SINGIN' IN THE RAIN' STAR KNEW THE STAGE WAS FOR HER", Orlando Sentinel, November 28, 1985. Accessed July 14, 2011. "[Mary D'Arcy], who is now 30 years old, still lives in Weehawken because, she said, "you'd have to be a millionaire to live in Manhattan with the same lifestyle." But on weekends, she and her husband, Karl Jurman, a pianist and theater conductor, go off to Spring Lake, N.J., to paint and plaster a house they recently bought."
  100. ^ Hevesi, Dennis. "Kermit Love, Costume Creator, Dies at 91", The New York Times, June 24, 2008. Accessed August 14, 2012. "Despite his assumed English (and sometimes French) accent, Kermit Ernest Hollingshead Love was born in Spring Lake, N.J., on Aug. 7, 1916."
  101. ^ Staff. "UTICA WELCOMES FARM LOAN BOARD; Bankers as Well as Farmers Agreeable to the Idea of Establishing a Bank There. GRANGERS ANXIOUS FOR IT Nearly 500 Agricultural Societies In New York State Indorse the New Federal Act.", The New York Times, August 25, 1916. Accessed December 7, 2012. "After the hearing today Secretary McAdoo returned to Spring Lake, N. J., because of the illness of Mrs. McAdoo, who has malarial fever, contracted in thetropics during her recent tour with the Secretary to South America."
  102. ^ "Who's your daddy?", The Boston Globe, October 14, 2004. Accessed December 7, 2012. "Dave McDonald of Spring Lake, NJ proudly displays the very close knockoff of the original and controversial Major League Baseball t-shirt."
  103. ^ Berkow, Ira. "BASEBALL: The Sweetest Sound of All; McDougald, Yankee Star of 50's, Can Hear Again After Operation", The New York Times, January 4, 1995. Accessed July 14, 2011. "The McDougalds had taken the nearly two-hour train ride from their home in Spring Lake, N.J., and would be going across the street to Bellevue Hospital."
  104. ^ Staff. "VINCENT MURPHY, LABOR LEADER, 83; Headed Jersey A.F.L.-C.I.O. and Was Mayor of Newark", The New York Times, June 9, 1976. Accessed August 14, 2012. "Vincent J. Murphy, the longtime New Jersey labor leader and former Mayor of Newark, died yesterday at his home in Spring Lake, N.J. He was 83 years old."
  105. ^ McDougal, Dennis (October 2007). Five Easy Decades: How Jack Nicholson Became the Biggest Movie Star in Modern Times. Wiley. p. 16. ISBN 0-471-72246-4.  "When Jack was ready for high school, the family moved once more-this time two miles (3 km) farther south to old-money Spring Lake, Jersey's so called Irish Riviera, where Ethel May set up her beauty parlor in a rambling duplex at 505 Mercer Avenue."
  106. ^ Nicholson, Jack. "No Getting Away From NJ: Hollywood legend Jack Nicholson attempts to elucidate the definitive quality of New Jersey.", New Jersey Monthly, November 15, 2010. Accessed July 14, 2011. "I grew up on the Shore...in Neptune, Neptune City, Manasquan, and Spring Lake. Graduated from Manasquan [High School]. No offense to Atlantic City, but, where we grew up, we called it 'The Shore.'"
  107. ^ Staff. "KARL G. ROEBLING DIES AT SPRING LAKE HOME; President of the Company That Built the Brooklyn Bridge Was 48 Years Old.", The New York Times, May 30, 1921. Accessed August 15, 2012.
  108. ^ Staff. "Emanuel Robert Senerchia, 72, Major League Baseball player, concert violinist and educator", Asbury Park Press, November 6, 2003. Accessed August 14, 2012. "A 20-year resident of Spring Lake, he also resided in Long Branch and Ocean Township, where he continued his careers in music and teaching."
  109. ^ Vitullo-Martin, Julia. "The (Spring) Lake Effect", The New York Sun, September 26, 2005. Accessed July 14, 2011. "Or as mystery writer and Spring Lake homeowner Mary Higgins Clark wrote of a character in her novel "On the Street Where You Live": He "enjoyed Spring Lake best once late autumn set in. By then the summer people had closed their houses, not appearing even for weekends.'"
  110. ^ Pike, Helen-Chantal. "By the sea - New Jersey's `Irish Riviera' offers a taste of summer from an earlier era", Boston Herald, July 3, 1997. Accessed July 17, 2012. "Movie buffs might remember Spring Lake as the setting for the 1968 film "The Subject Was Roses," in which Patricia Neal escaped her dingy New York apartment for solace by the seashore."
  111. ^ The Subject Was Roses - Notes, Turner Classic Movies. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  112. ^ Shabe, John. "Vampire Weekend films in Spring Lake, Sea Girt, report says", The Star-Ledger, July 18, 2008. Accessed July 17, 2012. "Pop music sensation Vampire Weekend did video shoots earlier this week on the beach in Sea Girt and inside a spiffy home in Spring Lake, MTV.com reports ..."
  113. ^ Staff. "SPRING LAKE OFFERS A PEACE OF THE PAST", The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 6, 1983. Accessed July 17, 2012. "Three years ago, when the producers of the movie Ragtime were looking for a setting for scenes that were supposed to depict Atlantic City at the turn of the [20th] century, they chose Spring Lake and its grand, ocean-front Essex and Sussex Hotel."
  114. ^ Marcus, Greil. The Manchurian Candidate, p. 19. Macmillan Publishers, 2002. ISBN 0-85170-931-1. Accessed July 14, 2011. "It's 1954. Major Ben Marco of the US Army, played by Frank Sinatra, is lying on his bed, fully clothed in his uniform, dreaming the same dream he dreams every night. He's sweating. As his lips twitch, the camera moves in and we enter his dream. We're in an old hotel in Spring Lake, New Jersey; a meeting of the Ladies Garden Club is in progress."

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Belmar
Beaches of New Jersey Succeeded by
Sea Girt