2016 Pokémon World Championships

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2016 Pokémon World Championships
2016
Pokémon World Championships logo.jpg
Tournament information
LocationSan Francisco, California
DatesAugust 19–21
Administrator(s)Play! Pokémon
Tournament
format(s)
Swiss rounds, knock-out finals
VenueSan Francisco Marriott Marquis
Purse$500,000[1]
Final positions
ChampionsUnited States Wolfe Glick (VGC Masters) [2]
United States Carson Confer (VGC Seniors) [3]
United States Cory Connor (VGC Juniors) [4]
Japan Shintaro Ito (TCG Masters) [5]
Denmark Jesper Eriksen (TCG Seniors) [6]
Japan Shunto Sadahiro (TCG Juniors) [7]
Runner-upUnited States Jonathan Evans (VGC Masters) [2]
Japan Yuki Wata (VGC Seniors) [3]
Japan Shu Harasaki (VGC Juniors) [4]
United States Cody Walinski (TCG Masters) [5]
United States Connor Pederson (TCG Seniors) [6]
Japan Riku Ushirosako (TCG Juniors) [7]
← 2015
2017 →

The 2016 Pokémon World Championships was the eighth annual e-Sport invite-only tournament held by Play! Pokémon, a branch of The Pokémon Company that unites the top Pokémon video game and Pokémon Trading Card Game players from around the world. The event was held at the San Francisco Marriott Marquis in San Francisco, California from August 19 to August 21.[8]

For the first time in the tournament history, the Pokkén Tournament invitational was featured alongside the Video Game Championships (VGC) and Trading Card Game (TCG) tournaments. Side events and an official store with event merchandise occurred alongside the event.

The defending Video Game champions were Shoma Honami from Japan (Masters Division), Mark McQuillan from the United Kingdom (Senior Division) and Kotone Yasue from Japan (Junior Division).[9] The defending Trading Card Game champions were Jacob Van Wagner from the United States (Masters Division), Patrick Martinez from the United States (Senior Division), and Rowan Stavenow from Canada.[10]

Age divisions and qualifications[edit]

Both the Pokémon VGC and TCG were divided into three age divisions: the Junior Division (born 2005 or later), the Senior Division (born between 2001 and 2004), and the Masters Division (born 2000 or earlier). For the Pokkén Tournament invitational, players were grouped into either the Senior Division (born 2001 or later) or Masters Division (born 2000 or earlier).

The process of obtaining an invitation is primarily based on Championship Points.[11] Players could earn Championship Points by performing in select online and live tournaments held throughout the 2016 season (between September 2015 and July 2016). Players from Japan and South Korea were excluded from this rule as these countries had their own method of qualification not based on Championship Points.

Play! Pokémon divided players into five different rating zones: US and Canada, Europe, Latin America, Asia-Pacific and South Africa. Different zones had different Championship Points requirements due to the distribution of events around the world.

There are two possible invitations players could obtain:

  • a regular 'Day One' invite, and
  • a 'Day Two' invite, which allowed players to acquire a 'Day One' bye and automatically enter the second Swiss tournament.

'Day Two' invites were usually accompanied by travel awards and stipends paid by Play! Pokémon.

Trading Card Game Championship qualifications[edit]

The following table shows the Championship Points[11] requirement for an invitation to the 2016 World Championships:

Zones Masters Division Senior Division Junior Division Day Two (Ranking)
US and Canada 300 CP 250 CP 200 CP Top 16 Players in each division
Europe 300 CP 250 CP 200 CP Top 22 Players in each division
Latin America 200 CP 150 CP 100 CP Top 8 Players in each division
Asia-Pacific 200 CP 150 CP 100 CP Top 8 Players in each division
South Africa 200 CP 150 CP 100 CP None

Players in Japan and South Korea were awarded invitations based on each country's organized play system.

Video Game Championship qualifications[edit]

For the Masters Division, the following table lists the Championship Points requirement for an invitation to the 2016 World Championships:[12]

Zones Day One Day Two (Ranking)
US and Canada 350 CP Top 8 of the Zone
Europe 275 CP Top 16 of the Zone
Latin America 150 CP Top 4 of the Zone
Asia-Pacific 200 CP Top 4 of the Zone
South Africa 400 CP None

Tournament structure[edit]

The Video Game Championships consisted of two Swiss tournaments and one single elimination tournament played across three days.

On Friday (Day 1), all players who earned an invitation without a Day 1 bye were entered into a Swiss tournament, where players with two or fewer losses would advance onto the next round. The second Swiss tournament was then played on Saturday (Day 2), where players who advanced from Day 1 were joined by players who received an invitation with a Day 1 bye.

At the end of the Day 2 Swiss tournament, players with two or fewer losses advanced to play in single elimination rounds until the last two remain. The finals took place on Sunday (Day 3).[13]

Final standings (Video Game Championships)[edit]

Place Junior Division Senior Division Masters Division
1st United States Cory Connor [4] United States Carson Confer [3] United States Wolfe Glick [2]
2nd Japan Shu Harasaki [4] Japan Yuki Wata [3] United States Jonathan Evans [2]
3rd Japan Rikuto Noda [4] United States Mostafa Afr [3] Germany Markus Stadter [2]
4th United States Enzo Reci [4] Japan Kazuki Ogushi [3] Portugal Eduardo Cunha [2]

Final standings (Trading Card Game)[edit]

Place Junior Division Senior Division Masters Division
1st Japan Shunto Sadahiro [7] Denmark Jesper Eriksen [6] Japan Shintaro Ito [5]
2nd Japan Riku Ushirosako [7] United States Connor Pedersen [6] United States Cody Walinski [5]
3rd United States Roan Godfrey-Robbins [7] Indonesia Rafli Attar [6] United States Samuel Hough [5]
4th Japan Yuta Ozawa [7] Brazil Raphael Souto [6] United States Ross Cawthon [5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 Pokémon World Championships". Play! Pokémon. Retrieved 26 August 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "2016 Pokémon World Championships Masters Division Top Cut Teams". Play! Pokemon. Retrieved 26 August 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "2016 Pokémon World Championships Senior Division Top Cut Teams". Play! Pokemon. Retrieved 26 August 2016.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "2016 Pokémon World Championships Junior Division Top Cut Teams". Play! Pokemon. Retrieved 26 August 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d e f "2016 Pokémon World Championships Masters Division Top Cut Decks". Play! Pokemon. Retrieved 26 August 2016.
  6. ^ a b c d e f "2016 Pokémon World Championships Senior Division Top Cut Decks". Play! Pokemon. Retrieved 26 August 2016.
  7. ^ a b c d e f "2016 Pokémon World Championships Junior Division Top Cut Decks". Play! Pokemon. Retrieved 26 August 2016.
  8. ^ "2016 Pokémon World Championship". Play! Pokemon. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  9. ^ "2015 Pokémon World Championships". Play! Pokemon. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  10. ^ "2015 Pokémon World Championships". Play! Pokémon. Retrieved 26 August 2016.
  11. ^ a b "Championship Points". Play! Pokémon. Retrieved 9 July 2016.
  12. ^ "2016 Pokémon VG World Championship Competitor Information". Play! Pokemon. Retrieved 18 March 2016.
  13. ^ "2016 Pokemon World Chamionships Standings". Video Game World Championships Results. Retrieved 11 October 2016.

External links[edit]