Demographics of Ivory Coast

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This article is about the demographic features of the population of Ivory Coast, including population density, ethnicity, education level, health of the populace, economic status, religious affiliations and other aspects of the population.

Population[edit]

Demographics of Ivory Coast, Data of FAO, year 2005 ; Number of inhabitants in thousands.

According to the 2017 revision of the World Population Prospects[1] the total population was 23,695,919 in 2016, compared to only 2 630 000 in 1950. The proportion of children below the age of 15 in 2010 was 40.9%, 55.3% was between 15 and 65 years of age, while 3.8% was 65 years or older .[2]

Total population (x 1000) Population aged 0–14 (%) Population aged 15–64 (%) Population aged 65+ (%)
1950 2 630 43.1 54.6 2.3
1955 3 072 43.0 54.6 2.4
1960 3 638 43.8 53.8 2.4
1965 4 424 44.6 52.9 2.4
1970 5 416 45.0 52.6 2.4
1975 6 768 45.4 52.2 2.4
1980 8 501 45.9 51.7 2.5
1985 10 495 45.9 51.5 2.5
1990 12 518 45.1 52.2 2.6
1995 14 677 43.2 54.0 2.8
2000 16 582 41.8 55.1 3.1
2005 18 021 41.8 54.8 3.5
2010 19 738 40.9 55.3 3.8

Structure of the population (DHS 2011-2012) (Males 23 630, Females 25 193 = 48 823) :

Age Group Male (%) Female (%) Total (%)
0-4 16,0 16,0 16,0
5-9 15,3 14,8 15,1
10-14 13,2 13,0 13,1
15-19 8,9 9,1 9,0
20-24 8,4 8,7 8,5
25-29 7,5 8,6 8,0
30-34 6,9 7,0 7,0
35-39 5,3 5,1 5,2
40-44 4,6 3,8 4,2
45-49 3,3 2,9 3,1
50-54 2,9 3,7 3,3
55-59 2,0 2,3 2,2
60-64 2,3 1,8 2,1
65-69 1,3 1,2 1,3
70-74 1,0 1,0 1,0
75-79 0,5 0,4 0,5
80+ 0,6 0,6 0,6
Age group Male (%) Female (%) Total (%)
0-14 44,5 43,8 44,2
15-64 52,1 53,0 52,4
65+ 3,4 3,2 3,4

Population Growth: 1.88% (2016 est.)[3]

Vital statistics[edit]

Registration of vital events is in Ivory Coast not complete. The Population Departement of the United Nations prepared the following estimates. [2]

Period Live births per year Deaths per year Natural change per year CBR* CDR* NC* TFR* IMR*
1950-1955 145 000 70 000 74 000 50.8 24.6 26.1 6.77 167
1955-1960 174 000 81 000 93 000 51.9 24.1 27.8 7.15 160
1960-1965 211 000 94 000 117 000 52.3 23.3 29.0 7.53 155
1965-1970 258 000 109 000 149 000 52.4 22.2 30.2 7.83 147
1970-1975 317 000 116 000 200 000 52.0 19.1 32.9 7.93 127
1975-1980 386 000 123 000 263 000 50.5 16.1 34.4 7.81 109
1980-1985 446 000 133 000 313 000 46.9 14.0 32.9 7.31 96
1985-1990 494 000 154 000 340 000 42.9 13.4 29.5 6.61 93
1990-1995 542 000 186 000 357 000 39.9 13.6 26.2 5.92 95
1995-2000 587 000 224 000 363 000 37.6 14.3 23.2 5.31 92
2000-2005 639 000 249 000 390 000 36.9 14.4 22.5 5.05 85
2005-2010 660 000 245 000 415 000 35.0 13.0 22.0 4.65 77
* CBR = crude birth rate (per 1000); CDR = crude death rate (per 1000); NC = natural change (per 1000); IMR = infant mortality rate per 1000 births; TFR = total fertility rate (number of children per woman)

Fertility and Births[edit]

Total Fertility Rate (TFR) (Wanted Fertility Rate) and Crude Birth Rate (CBR):[4]

Year CBR (Total) TFR (Total) CBR (Urban) TFR (Urban) CBR (Rural) TFR (Rural)
1994 41,3 5,7 (4,7) 38,8 4,7 (3,7) 42,5 6,4 (5,4)
1998-99 39,3 5,2 (4,5) 36,5 4,0 (3,4) 40,7 6,0 (5,2)
2005 38,4 4,6 35,1 3,6 40,8 5,5
2011-12 36,8 5,0 (4,1) 31,9 3,7 (3,2) 40,3 6,3 (5,0)

Fertility data as of 2011-2012 (DHS Program):[5]

Region Total fertility rate Percentage of women age 15-49 currently pregnant Mean number of children ever born to women age 40-49
Centre 6.1 10.6 6.9
Centre-Est 4.6 7.7 5.4
Centre-Nord 5.4 9.6 6.1
Centre-Ouest 5.4 11.0 5.7
Nord 6.1 9.7 6.9
Nord-Est 6.0 11.5 6.6
Nord-Ouest 6.8 12.4 7.1
Ouest 6.1 12.4 6.2
Sud 4.8 10.6 6.0
Sud-Ouest 5.0 15.5 5.9
Ville d'Abidjan 3.1 6.9 4.2

Ethnic groups[edit]

Ethnic groups
Ethnic groups in Ivory Coast[6]
Ethnic groups
Akan
32.1%
Other (includes European and Lebanese)
21.2%
Voltaique or Gur
15%
Northern Mande
12.4%
Krou
9.8%
Southern Mande
9%
Unspecified
0.5%

Ivory Coast has more than 60 ethnic groups, usually classified into five principal divisions: Akan (east and center, including Lagoon peoples of the southeast), Krou (southwest), Southern Mandé (west), Northern Mandé (northwest), Sénoufo/Lobi (north center and northeast). The Baoulés, in the Akan division, probably comprise the largest single subgroup with 15%-20% of the population. They are based in the central region around Bouaké and Yamoussoukro. The Bétés in the Krou division, the Sénoufos in the north, and the Malinkés in the northwest and the cities are the next largest groups, with 10%-15% of the national population. Most of the principal divisions have a significant presence in neighboring countries.

Of the more than 5 million non-Ivorian Africans living in Ivory Coast, one-third to one-half are from Burkina Faso; the rest are from Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Nigeria, Benin, Senegal, Liberia, and Mauritania. The non-African expatriate community includes roughly 50,000 French (this number may be inaccurate due to the evacuation of roughly 8,000 Frenchmen in November 2004) and possibly 40,000 Lebanese. The number of elementary school-aged children attending classes increased from 22% in 1960 to 67% in 1995.

Languages[edit]

French is official, and there are 81 living indigenous languages, and one that is now extinct. The Dioula dialect of Bambara is the most widely spoken one. Other language groups include the Gur languages, the Senufo languages, the Kru languages (including the Bété languages, Dida, Nyabwa, , and Western Krahn), and the Kwa languages (Baoulé and Anyin are the most used).

Religion[edit]

The economic development and relative prosperity of Ivory Coast fostered huge demographic shifts during the 20th century. "In 1922, an estimated 100,000 out of 1.6 million (or 6 percent) of people in Côte d'Ivoire were Muslims. By contrast, at independence (in 1960), their share of the population had increased rapidly, and Muslims were moving southward to the cocoa-producing areas and the southern cities. By 1998, [...], Muslims constituted a majority in the north of the country, and approximately 38.6 percent of the total population. This was a significantly larger population than the next largest religious group, Christians, who constituted approximately 29.1 percent of the total."[7] In earlier decades, this shift was mainly due to large-scale immigration from neighboring countries of the interior, that has been going on since colonial times and continued to be promoted during the Houphouet-Boigny era. Since the 1990s, the widening fertility gap between different religious groups has continued to tilt the demographic balance in favor of Muslims although immigration has become less important.[8]

Religions of IVORY COAST (2011-12 est.)[6]
Religions percent
Islam
40.2%
Roman Catholic
19.4%
Evangelical
19.3%
Animist or No Religion
12.8%
Other Christian
4.5%
Methodist
2.5%
Other Religion/Unspecified
1.4%

Ivorian diaspora[edit]

The table below shows the number of people born in Ivory Coast who have migrated to OECD countries only (the table only includes communities consisting of at least 1,000 members).[9]

Country Ivorian-born population See also
France France 457,231 Ivorians in France
United States United States 7,595
Italy Italy 7,242
United Kingdom United Kingdom 2,794 Ivorians in the United Kingdom
Canada Canada 1,865
Belgium Belgium 1,363
Switzerland Switzerland 1,100

CIA World Factbook demographic statistics[edit]

The following demographic statistics are from the CIA World Factbook, unless otherwise indicated.

Population[edit]

21,058,798 (2010 est.)
Note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the effects of excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower life expectancy, higher infant mortality and death rates, lower population and growth rates, and changes in the distribution of population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July 2010 est.)

Median age[edit]

Total 19.6
Male 19.7
Female 19.5 (2011 est.)

Sex ratio[edit]

At birth 1.03 male(s)/female
Under 15 years 1.02 male(s)/female
15–64 years 1.04 male(s)/female
65 years and over 0.99 male(s)/female
Total population 1.03 male(s)/female (2011 est.)

Life expectancy at birth[edit]

Total 58.01
Male 56.21 years
Female 58.33 years (2012 est.)

HIV/AIDS[edit]

Adult prevalence rate 3.4% (2009 est.)
People living with HIV/AIDS 450,000 (2009 est.)
Deaths 36,000 (2009 est.)

Major infectious diseases[edit]

Degree of risk very high
Food or Waterborne diseases bacterial diarrhea, hepatitis A, and typhoid fever
Water contact schistosomiasis
Animal contact disease rabies

Note: highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza has been identified in this country; it poses a negligible risk with extremely rare cases possible among US citizens who have close contact with birds (2009)

Nationality[edit]

Noun and adjective: Ivorian (Ivoirian)

Ethnic Groups[edit]

other 2.8% (includes 130,000 Lebanese and 14,000 French) (1998)

Literacy[edit]

Here literacy is defined as the ratio of people over age 15 who can read and write.

Total population 56.2%
Male 65.2%
Female 46.6% (2010 est.)

School life expectancy (primary to tertriary education)[edit]

Total 6 Years
Male 8 Years
Female 5 Years (2000)

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from the CIA World Factbook document "2006 edition".

  1. ^ "World Population Prospects: The 2017 Revision". ESA.UN.org (custom data acquired via website). United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved 10 September 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat, World Population Prospects: The 2010 Revision". Esa.un.org. Retrieved 2017-08-27. 
  3. ^ CIA World Factbook
  4. ^ "MEASURE DHS: Demographic and Health Surveys". microdata.worldbank.org. 
  5. ^ "Enquête Démographique et de Santé et à Indicateurs Multiples 2011-2012" (PDF). Dhsprogram.com. Retrieved 2017-08-27. 
  6. ^ a b "Africa :: IVORY COAST". CIA The World Factbook. 
  7. ^ Nordås, Ragnhild (2012). "The Devil in the Demography?". In Goldstone, Jack A.; Kaufmann, Eric P.; Toft, Monica Duffy. Political Demography. How Population Changes Are Reshaping International Security and National Politics. New York: Oxford University Press. p. 256. 
  8. ^ Nordås, Ragnhild (2012). "The Devil in the Demography?". In Goldstone, Jack A.; Kaufmann, Eric P.; Toft, Monica Duffy. Political Demography. How Population Changes Are Reshaping International Security and National Politics. New York: Oxford University Press. p. 257 f. 
  9. ^ "Country-of-birth database". Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Archived from the original on 17 June 2009. Retrieved 25 June 2010.