European Green Deal

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The European Green Deal is a set of policy initiatives brought forward by the European Commission with the overarching aim of making Europe climate neutral in 2050.[1][2] An impact assessed plan will also be presented to increase the EU’s greenhouse gas emission reductions target for 2030 to at least 50% and towards 55% compared with 1990 levels. The plan is to review each existing law on its climate merits, and also introduce new legislation on the circular economy, building renovation, biodiversity, farming and innovation.[2]

The president of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, stated that the European Green Deal would be Europe's "man on the Moon moment", as the plan would make Europe the first climate-neutral continent.[2] On 13 December 2019, the European Council decided to press ahead with the plan, with an opt-out for Poland.[3]

Overview[edit]

Compared to the proposed Green New Deal stimulus package of United States, the planned rate of decarbonisation of the economy is lower, with the EU aiming to become net-zero over three decades instead of within ten years.[4]

The plan includes potential carbon tariffs for countries that don't curtail their greenhouse gas pollution at the same rate.[4] It also includes:

  • a circular economy action plan,
  • a review and possible revision (where needed) of the all relevant climate-related policy instruments, including the Emissions Trading System,
  • a Farm to Fork strategy along with a focus shift from compliance to performance (which will reward farmers for managing and storing carbon in the soil, improved nutrient management, reducing emissions, ...),
  • a revision of the Energy Taxation Directive which is looking closely at fossil fuel subsidies and tax exemptions (aviation, shipping),
  • a sustainable and smart mobility strategy and an EU forest strategy. The latter will have as its key objectives effective afforestation, and forest preservation and restoration in Europe.

It also leans on Horizon Europe, to play a pivotal role in leveraging national public and private investments. Through partnerships with industry and member States, it will support research and innovation on transport technologies, including batteries, clean hydrogen, low-carbon steel making, circular bio-based sectors and the built environment.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tamma, Paola; Schaart, Eline; Gurzu, Anca (2019-12-11). "Europe's Green Deal plan unveiled". POLITICO. Retrieved 2019-12-29.
  2. ^ a b c Simon, Frédéric (2019-12-11). "EU Commission unveils 'European Green Deal': The key points". www.euractiv.com. Retrieved 2019-12-29.
  3. ^ Rankin, Jennifer (2019-12-13). "European Green Deal to press ahead despite Polish targets opt-out". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2019-12-29.
  4. ^ a b Valatsas, Dimitris (December 17, 2019). "Green Deal, Greener World". Foreign Policy. Retrieved 2019-12-29.
  5. ^ COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT, THE EUROPEAN COUNCIL, THE COUNCIL, THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE AND THE COMMITTEE OF THE REGIONS

External links[edit]