List of New York Public Library branches

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The New York Public Library system includes libraries in Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island. This page is organized by borough, and alphabetically. The boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens are supported by their own separate library systems.

Research libraries[edit]

Library Image Address Historical Note
1 Stephen A. Schwarzman Building (Main Branch)
[1]
New York Public Library-27527.jpg Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street Built after the New York Public Library was formed as a combination of two libraries in the late 1890s. The architectural firm Carrère and Hastings constructed the structure in the Beaux-Arts style, and the structure opened on May 23, 1911. The building was declared a National Historic Landmark, a National Register of Historic Places site, and a New York City designated landmark.[1]
2 Library for the Performing Arts (Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center)
[2]
LPA at night.jpg 40 Lincoln Center Plaza Opened in 1965, it houses one of the world's largest collections of materials relating to the performing arts.[2]
3 Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
[3]
Schomburg-center.jpg 515 Malcolm X Boulevard Designed by McKim, Mead & White and opened in 1905.
4 Science, Industry and Business Library
[4]
B. Altman Building Madison Avenue street facade 188 Madison Avenue Created in 1996 when materials relating to science, business, and related fields were relocated from the Schwarzman Building to the former B. Altman & Company Building at Madison Avenue and East 34th Street.[3]

Libraries in Manhattan[edit]

Library Image Address Historical Note
5 Harry Belafonte 115th Street Library
[5]
NYPL 115th Street Branch, Manhattan.jpg 203 West 115th Street Designed by McKim, Mead & White and opened in 1907
6 125th Street Library
[6]
NYPL 125th Street Branch, Manhattan.jpg 224 East 125th Street Designed by McKim, Mead & White and opened in 1904.
7 58th Street Library
[7]
127 East 58th Street Originally designed by Carrère & Hastings and opened May 10, 1907. The original building was demolished and replaced by a new branch in two floors of an office tower at 127 East 58th Street, which opened in 1969.
8 67th Street Library
[8]
NYPL 67th Street Branch, Manhattan.jpg 328 East 67th Street Designed by the firm Babb, Cook, & Willard; and was constructed with funds provided by Andrew Carnegie; built to resemble the Yorkville Branch of the library; renovated in the 1950s, and then again in 2005
9 96th Street Library
[9]
NYPL 96th Street Branch, Manhattan.jpg 112 East 96th Street Designed by Babb, Cook, & Willard and opened in 1905; constructed with funds provided by Andrew Carnegie.[4]
10 Aguilar Library
[10]
NYPL Aguilar Branch, Manhattan.jpg 174 East 110th Street Originally named the Aguilar Free Library Society in 1896, for Grace Aguilar, a Sephardic Jewish author; merged with the NYPL in 1905 and moved into a new location that was built using Carnegie funds. The Library is known for its large collection of Spanish titles.[5]
11 Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library
[11]
Andrew Heiskell NYPL 40 W20 jeh.jpg 40 West 20th Street
12 Battery Park City Library
[12]
NYPL Murray St BPC evacuation drill jeh 175 North End Avenue Designed by 1100 Architect in 2010.[6]
13 Bloomingdale Library
[13]
NYFCL Bloomingdale Branch 150 West 100th Street Opened in 1898 as the Bloomingdale Branch of the New York Free Circulating Library; merged with the New York Public Library in 1901; rebuilt one block east in 1961.
14 Chatham Square Library
[14]
NYPL Chatham Square Branch, Manhattan.jpg 33 East Broadway Opened in 1903 as a branch of the New York Free Circulating Library; rebuilt in 1911 with funds contributed by Andrew Carnegie; one of the busiest branches of the NYPL.
15 Columbus Library
[15]
NYPL Columbus Branch, Manhattan crop.jpg 742 10th Avenue First opened in 1909 and was built using funds contributed by Andrew Carnegie; Columbus Library received major collections from the reading room of the Columbus Catholic club; operated on one floor from the 1970s until 2004, until more rooms were incorporated after a 2005 remodel.
16 Countee Cullen Library [16] NYPL Countee Cullen Branch.jpg 104 West 136th Street Opened on January 14, 1905, originally named the 135th Street Branch; built using funds contributed by Andrew Carnegie; original building is now part of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture; named for the poet and teacher Countee Cullen, who plays a role in the Harlem Renaissance, in 1951.
17 Donnell Library Center
[17]
NYPL-Donnell 20 West 53rd Street Opened in 1955, and closed in 2008; had a large reference and circulating collection.[7]
18 Epiphany Library
[18]
NYPL Epiphany Branch, Manhattan.jpg 228 East 23rd Street
19 Fort Washington Library
[19]
NYPL Fort Washington Branch, Manhattan.jpg 535 West 179th Street
20 George Bruce Library
[20]
NYFCL George Bruce Branch 518 West 125th Street
21 Grand Central Library
[21]
Grand Central NYPL 135 E46 jeh.jpg 135 East 46th Street
22 Hamilton Fish Park Library
[22]
415 East Houston Street
23 Hamilton Grange Library
[23]
NYPL Hamilton Grange Branch, Manhattan.jpg 503 West 145th Street
24 Harlem Library
[24]
NYPL Harlem Branch, Manhattan.jpg 9 West 124th Street
25 Hudson Park Library
[25]
NYPL Hudson Park Branch, Manhattan.jpg 66 Leroy Street
26 Inwood Library
[26]
NYPL Inwood Branch.jpg 4790 Broadway
27 Jefferson Market Library
[27]
Jefferson Market Library 425 Avenue of the Americas
28 Kips Bay Library
[28]
Kips Bay NYPL jeh 446 Third Avenue
29 Macomb's Bridge Library
[29]
2650 Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Boulevard
30 Mid-Manhattan Library
[30]
Mid-Manhattan Library 455 Fifth Avenue Opened in 1970 to replace the circulating division at the Schwarzman Building, it originally operated in a temporary space.[8][9] It moved into the former Arnold Constable & Company store in 1981.[10] The library temporarily relocated to the Schwarzman Building when the Mid-Manhattan Library building closed for renovations in 2017,[11] and will be renamed the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Library when it reopens in 2020.[12]
31 Morningside Heights Library
[31]
Morningside NYPL Bwy 113 jeh 2900 Broadway
32 Muhlenberg Library
[32]
NYPL Muhlenberg Branch, Manhattan.jpg 209 West 23rd Street
33 Mulberry Street Library
[33]
Jersey St NYPL across Mulberry jeh.jpg 10 Jersey Street
34 New Amsterdam Library
[34]
NYPL New Amsterdam Library IMG 2724 HLG.jpg 9 Murray Street
35 Ottendorfer Library
[35]
Freie Bibliothek and Deutsches Dispensary 135 Second Avenue
36 Riverside Library
[36]
127 Amsterdam Avenue
37 Roosevelt Island Library
[37]
524 Main Street Opened In 1979 after being located in the Herman and Dorothy Reade apartment, then a community room, for three years.[13]
38 Seward Park Library
[38]
NYPL Seward Park Branch, Manhattan.jpg 192 East Broadway Originally a branch of the Aguilar Free Library Society, and was initially built in 1886; the branch that stands today was built with Carnegie funds and opened in 1909.[14]
39 St. Agnes Library
[39]
NYPL Saint Agnes Branch, Manhattan.jpg 444 Amsterdam Avenue
40 Terence Cardinal Cooke–Cathedral Library
[40]
560 Lexington Avenue
41 Tompkins Square Library
[41]
NYPL Tompkins Square Branch, Manhattan.jpg 331 East 10th Street
42 Washington Heights Library
[42]
NYPL Washington Heights Branch, Manhattan.jpg 1000 St. Nicholas Avenue
43 Webster Library
[43]
NYPL Webster Branch, Manhattan.jpg 1465 York Avenue Originally part of the Webster Free Library, founded by the East Side House settlement in 1894; absorbed by the NYPL in 1904, and it was set for a new library to be built with funds from Andrew Carnegie's gift to the city.[15]
44 Yorkville Library
[44]
NYPL Yorkville Branch, Manhattan.jpg 222 East 79th Street Opened in 1902 as the first library built with Carnegie funds; designed by James Brown Lord.[16]
45 53rd Street Library [17] NYPL 53rd Street Branch - the-groundview.jpg 18 West 53rd Street The 53rd Street branch opened on June 27, 2016.[17]

Libraries in the Bronx[edit]

Library Image Address Historical Note
46 Allerton Library
[45]
NYPL Bronx Allerton Branch Library IMG 2752 HLG.jpg 2740 Barnes Avenue Opened in 1960, designed by Hertz and Salerni in conjunction with Department of Public Works.[18]
47 Baychester Library
[46]
NYPL Bronx Baychester Library Co-op City 2049 Asch Loop North First opened in 1973, and remodeled in 2003.[citation needed]
48 Belmont Library and Enrico Fermi Cultural Center
[47]
610 East 186th Street
49 Bronx Library Center
[48]
Bronx Library Center 310 East Kingsbridge Road
50 Castle Hill Library
[49]
947 Castle Hill Avenue
51 City Island Library
[50]
City Island Library 320 City Island Avenue
52 Clason's Point Library
[51]
1215 Morrison Avenue Designed by John J. O'Malley.
53 Eastchester Library
[52]
1385 East Gun Hill Road
54 Edenwald Library
[53]
Edenwald Library 1255 East 233rd Street
55 Francis Martin Library
[54]
Francis W. Martin Library 2150 University Avenue Named after Francis W. Martin, the first district attorney of the Bronx.
56 Grand Concourse Library
[55]
Grand Concourse Library 155 East 173rd Street 40°50′38″N 73°54′36″W / 40.84389°N 73.91000°W / 40.84389; -73.91000
57 High Bridge Library
[56]
High Bridge NYPL W168 St fr Woodycrest Av Bx cloudy jeh.jpg 78 West 168th Street
58 Hunt's Point Library
[57]
Hunt's Point Library 877 Southern Boulevard
59 Jerome Park Library
[58]
Jerome Park Library 118 Eames Place
60 Kingsbridge Library
[59]
Kingsbridge Library 291 West 231st Street
61 Melrose Library
[60]
Melrose Bx NYPL 910 Morris Av jeh 910 Morris Avenue Opened in 1914 as the first free circulating collection of books in the South Bronx using a portion of Andrew Carnegie's gift to the city; the building was designed by the Carrere and Hastings.[19]
62 Morris Park Library
[61]
985 Morris Park Avenue
63 Morrisania Library
[62]
Morrisania Library 610 East 169th Street
64 Mosholu Library
[63]
Mosholu Library 285 East 205th Street Opened in 1954.[20]
65 Mott Haven Library
[64]
Mott Haven Library 321 East 140th Street
66 Parkchester Library
[65]
Parkchester Library 1985 Westchester Avenue
67 Pelham Bay Library
[66]
Pelham Bay Library 3060 Middletown Road
68 Pelham Parkway–Van Nest Library
[67]
Pelham Bay Library 2147 Barnes Avenue "The history of the branch goes back to 1912, when it was first established as a station of NYPL's Travelling Libraries program, bringing library books to neighborhoods that didn't yet have branches. The Van Nest sub-branch opened in 1917, and occupied a series of small, but progressively larger storefront locations around the neighborhood, until it moved to its current location in 1968."[21] After years of "clamoring"[22] and "an unprecedented amount of support" for the renaming of the branch, the Van Nest Library was renamed Pelham Parkway-Van Nest on August 27, 2014.[23]
69 Riverdale Library
[68]
5540 Mosholu Avenue
70 Sedgwick Library
[69]
1701 Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard
71 Soundview Library
[70]
Soundview Library 660 Soundview Avenue
72 Spuyten Duyvil Library
[71]
Spuyten Duyvil Library 650 West 235th Street
73 Throg's Neck Library
[72]
3025 Cross Bronx Expressway Extension
74 Tremont Library
[73]
Tremont Library 1866 Washington Avenue
75 Van Cortlandt Library
[74]
3874 Sedgwick Avenue
76 Wakefield Library
[75]
Wakefield Library 4100 Lowerre Place
77 West Farms Library
[76]
2085 Honeywell Avenue
78 Westchester Square Library
[77]
Westchester Square Library 2521 Glebe Avenue
79 Woodlawn Heights Library
[78]
4355 Katonah Avenue
80 Woodstock Library
[79]
761 East 160th Street The Woodstock branch, a two-story Carnegie library building opened in 1914, contains children's, young adult, and adult collections at ground level and a multipurpose room on the second floor.[24]

Libraries in Staten Island[edit]

Library Image Address Historical Note
81 Dongan Hills Library
[80]
1617 Richmond Road The branch started operating out of a location on Richmond Road in 1957 and moved to its current one-story location in 1975. The building was refurbished in 2008.[25]
82 Great Kills Library
[81]
Great Kills NYPL jeh 56 Giffords Lane The Great Kills branch was opened in 1927 as a one-story building and was replaced by the current three-story building in the 1950s. Fully renovated in 2005, it currently has a lower level for community events, a first floor for adult collections, and a second floor for children's collections.[26][27]
83 Huguenot Park Library
[82]
Huguenot NYPL jeh.JPG 830 Huguenot Avenue The branch opened in January 1985, replacing what was once the smallest New York Public Library building just east of the station (still standing). The Huguenot Park branch was possibly named in honor of the nearby Staten Island Railway station's former name.[28]
84 Mariners Harbor Library
[83]
206 South Avenue 40°38′5″N 74°9′59″W / 40.63472°N 74.16639°W / 40.63472; -74.16639 [29] Opened on December 16, 2013, the Mariners Harbor Library is located amidst the rich maritime heritage of Staten Island's Mariners Harbor neighborhood. A single-story branch library situated on a 16,000-square foot plot, Mariners Harbor is the thirteenth branch of The New York Public Library on Staten Island and serves roughly 30,000 people.[30]
85 New Dorp Library
[84]
NYPL New Dorp jeh.jpg 309 New Dorp Lane First opened in 1907, then moved several times. In 1910, the branch moved to a real estate office owned by a local resident, in 1920 the community provided and maintained the library building, then in 1926, the library became part of the NYPL system. Finally, the branch moved to a store building, renamed the "James Watson Hughes Memorial Library," in 1928.[31]
86 Port Richmond Library
[85]
NYPL Port Richmond Branch, Staten Island.jpg 75 Bennett Street Interest in a library began in 1833, and various private library groups operated during the 19th century. The Port Richmond branch's current Carnegie library structure was built in 1905, becoming Port Richmond's permanent library. The Chimes Playhouse auditorium was constructed in 1939, and the Children's Room was rehabilitated in 2008.[32][33]
87 Richmondtown Library
[86]
Richmondtown NYPL jeh 200 Clarke Avenue The Richmondtown branch opened in 1996 and contains two floors: a first floor for adults and a second floor for children.[34]
88 South Beach Library
[87]
South Beach NYPL jeh 21-25 Robin Road The South Beach branch started operating out of a location on Sand Lane in the mid-20th century, but was destroyed in a 1989 fire. The South Beach branch reopened in 1990 and moved to its current one-story, 3,000-square-foot (280 m2) location on Robin Road in 2000.[35]
89 St. George Library Center
[88]
NYPL Saint George Branch, Staten Island.jpg 5 Central Avenue Opened June 1907, designed by Carrère and Hastings and built using Carnegie funds.[36]
90 Stapleton Library
[89]
NYPL Stapleton Branch, Staten Island.jpg 132 Canal Street The Carrere & Hastings-designed Carnegie library was built in 1907. It underwent significant renovations and remodeling from 2011 to 2013, including the addition of a 7,600-square-foot (710 m2) building.[37] A minor controversy arose over the discrepancy of architectural styles between the modernist black-glass addition and the original structure.[38]
91 Todt Hill–Westerleigh Library
[90]
2550 Victory Boulevard The three-story branch opened in 1991.[39]
92 Tottenville Library
[91]
Tottenville NYPL jeh.JPG 7430 Amboy Road The one-story Carnegie library building was designed by Carrère and Hastings and opened in 1904. It is a New York City designated landmark.[40]
93 West New Brighton Library
[92]
976 Castleton Avenue When the branch opened in 1913, it was a sub-branch of the NYPL. The West New Brighton moved to a second location in 1918, and then to its present site in 1933.[41]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building". The New York Public Library. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  2. ^ The New York Public Library. "New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center". Nypl.org. Retrieved February 12, 2013.
  3. ^ "About the Science, Industry and Business Library (SIBL)". The New York Public Library. Retrieved September 17, 2019.
  4. ^ "67th Street Branch Records". The New York Public Library. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  5. ^ "Aguilar Branch Records". The New York Public Library. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  6. ^ "The New York Public Library, Battery Park City". 1100 Architect. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  7. ^ "Donnell Library Center Records". The New York Public Library. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  8. ^ Campbell, Barbara (October 21, 1970). "Dream of Library Realized". The New York Times. Retrieved December 22, 2018.
  9. ^ "A library designed for people as well as books". New York Daily News. November 27, 1970. p. 153. Retrieved December 18, 2018 – via newspapers.com. open access
  10. ^ "Overdue: The public library". New York Daily News. December 28, 1980. p. 170. Retrieved December 18, 2018 – via newspapers.com. open access
  11. ^ "NYPL to close Mid-Manhattan Library for $200M, 3-year renovation in August". New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV. June 29, 2017. Retrieved July 7, 2017.
  12. ^ "A $55 Million Gift, and a New Name, for the Mid-Manhattan Library". The New York Times. September 13, 2017. Retrieved December 23, 2018.
  13. ^ "Timeline of Roosevelt Island History". NYC 10044. Archived from the original on May 7, 2015. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  14. ^ "Seward Park Branch Records". The New York Public Library. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  15. ^ "Webster Branch Records". The New York Public Library. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  16. ^ "Yorkville Branch Records". The New York Public Library. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  17. ^ a b "NYPL Locations". The New York Public Library. Retrieved August 9, 2016.
  18. ^ "Allerton Branch Records". The New York Public Library. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  19. ^ "Melrose Branch Records". The New York Public Library. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  20. ^ "Mosholu Branch Records". The New York Public Library. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  21. ^ "About the Pelham Parkway-Van Nest Library". New York Public Library. Retrieved February 27, 2016.
  22. ^ Kochman, Ben (May 23, 2014). "Put it in the books! City to change Van Nest Library name". Retrieved February 25, 2016.
  23. ^ "The New York Public Library To Rename Beloved Bronx Branch the Pelham Parkway-Van Nest Library". New York Public Library. Retrieved February 27, 2016.
  24. ^ "About the Woodstock Library". The New York Public Library. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  25. ^ "About the Dongan Hills Library". The New York Public Library. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  26. ^ "About the Great Kills Library". The New York Public Library. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  27. ^ Benanti, Carol Ann (February 2, 2017). "Vintage photos of Staten Island libraries". Staten Island Advance. Retrieved March 21, 2019. The photo was taken in the 1940s... It was replaced with a newer and larger library before 1957.
  28. ^ "About the Huguenot Park Library". The New York Public Library. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  29. ^ https://www.nypl.org/about/locations/mariners-harbor
  30. ^ "About Mariners Harbor Library". The New York Public Library. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  31. ^ "New Dorp Branch Records". The New York Public Library. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  32. ^ "About the Port Richmond Library". The New York Public Library. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  33. ^ Wilson, Andrew. "The Port Richmond Branch of The New York Public Library The First 50 Years: 1905–1955." Staten Island Historian. Volume 19, New Series 2. Spring 2002. Retrieved 2008-12-22.
  34. ^ "About the Richmondtown Library". The New York Public Library. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  35. ^ "About the South Beach Library". The New York Public Library. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  36. ^ "St. George Branch Records". The New York Public Library. Retrieved June 5, 2015.
  37. ^ "About the Stapleton Library". New York Public Library. Retrieved February 28, 2019.
  38. ^ "Mud Lane asks city to reconsider Stapleton library renovations". SILive.com. Retrieved September 4, 2012.
  39. ^ "About the Todt Hill-Westerleigh Library". The New York Public Library. April 18, 1991. Retrieved March 19, 2019.
  40. ^ "About the Tottenville Library". The New York Public Library. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  41. ^ "About the West New Brighton Library". The New York Public Library. Retrieved March 14, 2019.

Further reading[edit]

  • Dain, Phyllis. 2000. The New York Public Library: a universe of knowledge. New York: New York Public Library in association with Scala Publishers, London.
  • Dierickx, Mary B. (1996). The Architecture of Literacy: The Carnegie Libraries of New York City. New York: Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art and the New York City Dept. of General Services. ISBN 1-56256-717-9.

External links[edit]