Massachusetts's 7th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Massachusetts's 7th congressional district
Massachusetts US Congressional District 7 (since 2013).tif
Massachusetts's 7th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
U.S. RepresentativeMike Capuano (DSomerville)
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+34[1]

Massachusetts's 7th congressional district is a congressional district located in eastern Massachusetts, including roughly half of the city of Boston and a few of its northern and southern suburbs. Massachusetts congressional redistricting after the 2010 census changed the borders of the district starting with the elections of 2012, with most of the old 7th district redistricted to the new 5th district.[2] Most of the old 8th district now comprise the new 7th district. The seat is currently held by Mike Capuano, former mayor of Somerville. However, Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley defeated Capuano in the 2018 Democratic primary, and subsequently won the general election. Pressley is currently the district's Representative-elect, scheduled to take office in January 2019.

Cities and towns in the district[edit]

  • Boston:
    • Wards 1, 2
    • Ward 3: Precincts 7, 8
    • Ward 4
    • Ward 5: Precincts 1, 2, 2A, 6-10
    • Ward 7: Precinct 10
    • Wards 8-10
    • Ward 11: Precincts 1-8
    • Ward 12
    • Ward 13: Precincts 1, 2, 4-6, 8 and 9
    • Ward 14
    • Ward 15
    • Ward 16: Precincts 1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 11
    • Ward 17
    • Ward 18
    • Ward 19: Precincts 7, 10-13
    • Ward 20: Precinct 3
    • Wards 21 and 22

(the remainder of Boston is in the 8th district)

  • Cambridge:
    • Wards 1, 2, 3, 5, 11
    • Ward 4: Precinct 1
    • Ward 10: Precinct 3

(the remainder of Cambridge is in the 5th district)

(the remainder of Milton is in the 8th district)

Cities and towns in the district prior to 2013[edit]

1790s-1830s[edit]

1840s[edit]

1849: "The whole of Berkshire County; Ashfield, Buckland, Charlemont, Coleraine, Conway, Hawley, Heath, Leyden, Monroe, Rowe, and Shelburne, in Franklin County; Chesterfield, Cummington, Goshen, Middlefield, Norwich, Plainfield, Southampton, Westhampton, Williamsburg, and Worthington, in Hampshire County; and Blandford, Chester, Granville, Montgomery, Russell, and Tolland, in the County of Hampden."[3]

1850s-1880s[edit]

An act of the legislature passed April 22, 1852 divided the 7th district of Massachusetts as such: "The towns of Andover, Boxford, Bradford, Danvers, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lynnfield, Methuen, Middleton, Saugus, and Topsfield in the county of Essex; and the city of Charlestown, and the towns of Burlington, Lexington, Malden, Medford, Melrose, Reading, Somerville, South Reading, Stoneham, Waltham, and Woburn, in the county of Middlesex."[4]

1890s[edit]

Massachusetts's 7th congressional district, 1891

1893: "Essex County: Towns of Lynn, Nahant, and Saugus. Middlesex County: Towns of Everett, Malden, Melrose, Stoneham, and Wakefield. Suffolk County: 4th and 5th wards of the city of Boston, and the towns of Chelsea and Revere."[5]

1910s[edit]

1916: In Essex County: Boxford, Lawrence, Lynn, Lynnfield, Middleton, Nahant, North Andover, Peabody, Saugus. In Middlesex County: North Reading.[6][7]

1940s[edit]

1941: In Essex County: Lawrence, Lynn (part), Middleton, Nahant, North Andover, Peabody. In Suffolk County: Chelsea, Revere, Winthrop.[8]

1950s-2002[edit]

2003-2013[edit]

The district from 2003 to 2013

In Middlesex County:

In Suffolk County:

List of members representing the district[edit]

Representative Party Years Note
George Leonard of Congress.jpg
George Leonard
Pro-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1791
Redistricted to 6th district.
Artemas Ward.jpg
Artemas Ward
Pro-Administration March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
Redistricted to the 2nd district.
District discontinued March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
George Leonard of Congress.jpg
George Leonard
Federalist March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
[Data unknown/missing.]
Stephen Bullock Federalist March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1799
[Data unknown/missing.]
Phanuel Bishop Democratic-Republican March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1803
Redistricted to 9th district.
Nahum Mitchell, head-and-shoulders portrait, right profile LCCN2007675931.tif
Nahum Mitchell
Federalist March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1805
[Data unknown/missing.]
Joseph Barker Democratic-Republican March 4, 1805 –
March 4, 1809
[Data unknown/missing.]
William Baylies Federalist March 4, 1809 –
June 28, 1809
Lost election challenge
Charles Turner Jr. Democratic-Republican June 28, 1809 –
March 3, 1813
Won election challenge
William Baylies Federalist March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
Redistricted to the 8th district.
John W. Hulbert Federalist March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
Redistricted from the 12th district.
Henry Shaw Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1821
[Data unknown/missing.]
Henry Williams Dwight by John Trumbull 1827.jpeg
Henry W. Dwight
Federalist March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Redistricted to the 9th district.
Samuel C. Allen Adams-Clay Federalist March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Redistricted from the 6th district.
Adams March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
George Grennell Jr. Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1833
Redistricted to the 6th district.
'George Nixon Briggs-Southworth and Hawes.jpg
George N. Briggs'
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
Redistricted from the 9th district

Retired.
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1843
JuliusRockwell.jpg
Julius Rockwell
Whig March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1851
[Data unknown/missing.]
JohnZGoodrich.jpg
John Z. Goodrich
Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
Redistricted to the 11th district.
Nathaniel Prentice Banks.jpg
Nathaniel P. Banks
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
Resigned to become Governor
Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
Republican March 4, 1857 –
December 24, 1857
Vacant December 24, 1857 –
January 31, 1858
Daniel W Gooch.png
Daniel W. Gooch[9]
Republican January 31, 1858 –
March 4, 1863
Redistricted to the 6th district.
George Boutwell, Brady-Handy photo portrait, ca1870-1880.jpg
George S. Boutwell
Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 12, 1869
Resigned to become U.S. Secretary of Treasury
Vacant March 12, 1869 –
November 2, 1869
George Merrick Brooks (Massachusetts Congressman).jpg
George M. Brooks
Republican November 2, 1869 –
May 13, 1872
Resigned
Vacant May 13, 1872 –
December 2, 1872
Constantine C. Esty.png
Constantine C. Esty
Republican December 2, 1872 –
March 3, 1873
[Data unknown/missing.]
EbenezerRHoar.jpg
Ebenezer R. Hoar
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
[Data unknown/missing.]
John K. Tarbox.jpg
John K. Tarbox
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
[Data unknown/missing.]
Benjamin Franklin Butler Brady-Handy.jpg
Benjamin F. Butler[10]
Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1879
[Data unknown/missing.]
WilliamARussell.jpg
William A. Russell[11]
Republican March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1883
Redistricted to the 8th district.
Eben Francis Stone CDV by John Adams Whipple, 1862.jpg
Eben F. Stone
Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
Redistricted from the 6th district.
William Cogswell2.jpg
William Cogswell
Republican March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1893
Redistricted to the 6th district.
Vacant March 4, 1893 –
April 25, 1893
Representative Henry Cabot Lodge had been redistricted from the 6th district, but resigned before beginning of term to become a U.S. Senator.
William Everett.jpg
William Everett
Democratic April 25, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
[Data unknown/missing.]
William Emerson Barrett.png
William Emerson Barrett[12]
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1899
[Data unknown/missing.]
Ernest W Roberts Massachusetts Congressman.png
Ernest W. Roberts[13]
Republican March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1913
Redistricted to the 9th district.
Michael Francis Phelan.png
Michael Francis Phelan
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1921
Lost re-election
Robert S. Maloney.png
Robert S. Maloney
Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
[Data unknown/missing.]
William P. Connery Jr. cph.3a01362.jpg
William P. Connery Jr.
Democratic March 4, 1923 –
June 15, 1937
Died
Vacant June 16, 1937 –
September 27, 1937
Lawrence J. Connery (Massachusetts Congressman).jpg
Lawrence J. Connery[14]
Democratic September 28, 1937 –
October 19, 1941
Died
Vacant October 20, 1941 –
December 29, 1941
Thomas J. Lane (Massachusetts Congressman).jpg
Thomas J. Lane
Democratic December 30, 1941 –
January 3, 1963
[Data unknown/missing.]
Torbert Macdonald.jpg
Torbert H. Macdonald[15]
Democratic January 3, 1963 –
May 21, 1976
Redistricted from the 8th district

Died.
Vacant May 22, 1976 –
November 1, 1976
Ed Markey, Official Portrait, 112th Congress 2.jpg
Ed Markey[16]
Democratic November 2, 1976 –
January 3, 2013
Elected to finish Macdonald's term.

Redistricted to the 5th district.
Mike Capuano.jpg
Michael Capuano
Democratic January 3, 2013 –
Present
Redistricted from the 8th district.

Lost renomination.
Ayanna Pressley Sept2018.png
Ayanna Pressley
Democratic January 3, 2019 –
Elected in 2018.
Representative Party Years Note

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  2. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/spr/sprcat/catpdf2010/cong2010/CongressionalDistrict_2011State.pdf Access date: March 21, 2012.
  3. ^ John Hayward (1849). "Congressional Districts". Gazetteer of Massachusetts. Boston: J.P. Jewett & Co.
  4. ^ "Congressional Districts". Massachusetts Register (1st ed.). Boston, MA: Sampson Adams & Co. 1862.
  5. ^ Francis M. Cox (1893). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Third Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  6. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 64th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1916.
  7. ^ Commonwealth of Massachusetts (1921), "Population of Congressional Districts", Population of Massachusetts as determined by the fourteenth census of the United States 1920, Boston: Wright & Potter
  8. ^ Commonwealth of Massachusetts (1941), "Population of Congressional Districts", Population of Massachusetts as determined by the sixteenth census of the United States, 1940, Boston: Wright & Potter, OCLC 10056477, House No. 2849
  9. ^ "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh Congress. Washington DC: House of Representatives. 1861.
  10. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1878). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 45th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  11. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1882). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 47th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  12. ^ L.A. Coolidge (1897). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Fifth Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  13. ^ A.J. Halford (1909). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 60th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  14. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 75th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1938.
  15. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 90th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1968.
  16. ^ "Massachusetts". 1991-1992 Official Congressional Directory: 102nd Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1991.

External links[edit]

Maps[edit]

Election results[edit]

Coordinates: 42°19′00″N 71°00′34″W / 42.31667°N 71.00944°W / 42.31667; -71.00944