Oxcombe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Oxcombe
All Saint's Church, Oxcombe - geograph.org.uk - 168093.jpg
All Saints' Church, Oxcombe
Oxcombe is located in Lincolnshire
Oxcombe
Oxcombe
Location within Lincolnshire
OS grid referenceTF311771
• London120 mi (190 km) S
Civil parish
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townHORNCASTLE
Postcode districtLN9
Dialling code01507
PoliceLincolnshire
FireLincolnshire
AmbulanceEast Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Lincolnshire
53°16′32″N 0°02′07″W / 53.275515°N 0.035151°W / 53.275515; -0.035151Coordinates: 53°16′32″N 0°02′07″W / 53.275515°N 0.035151°W / 53.275515; -0.035151

Oxcombe is a small village in the civil parish of Maidenwell in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. It is situated 3 miles (5 km) west from the A16 road, 6 miles (10 km) south from Louth and 6 miles north-east from Horncastle.

Oxcombe was previously a parish in its own right, although small; in the 1870s it comprised 27 people and 4 houses[1]

To the south of Oxcombe lies the parish of Worlaby and to the east, that of Ruckland.[2]

The parish name may have been derived from the Old English oxa+coomb which means ox valley.[2]

All Saints Church[edit]

Built in 1842 and attributed to the architect William Adams Nicholson of Lincoln.[3] The church is similar in style to other churches in the vicinity - Haugham, Raithby and Biscathorpe also by Nicholson. A small church, built in brick with an octagonal west tower, which also forms the porch to the church It has a two bay nave with a chancel with a three sided apse. The bell stage of the tower is an open stone lantern with cast-iron pinnacles. The interior of the church cottons a fine series of Monuments to the Grant family. The church was declared redundant in 1980 and is in the care of the Lincolnshire Old Churches Trust.

Oxcombe House[edit]

Also in the style of Nicholson. Built in 1845. Tudoresque, with mullioned and transomed windows. Buttresses crowned by turrets on either side of the porch.[3]

Literature[edit]

  • Antram N (revised), Pevsner N & Harris J, (1989), The Buildings of England: Lincolnshire, Yale University Press.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wilson, John Marius; Wilson's Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales 1870-72.[page needed]
  2. ^ a b "Oxcombe (Oxcomb)"; Rootsweb Lincolnshire GenWeb Project. Retrieved 22 June 2012
  3. ^ a b "Antram", (1989), 598-9.