List of lieutenant governors of Wisconsin

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Number of Lieutenant Governors of Wisconsin by party affiliation
Party Lt. Governors
Republican 29
Democratic 13
Progressive 2

The lieutenant governor is the first person in the order of succession of Wisconsin's executive branch, thus serving as governor in the event of the death, resignation, removal, impeachment, absence from the state, or incapacity due to illness of the Governor of Wisconsin.[1]

Until 1979, the Wisconsin Constitution merely stated that in any of these events, "the powers and duties of the office [of Governor of Wisconsin] shall devolve upon the lieutenant governor".[1] Lieutenant governors who served as governor during this period are referred to as "acting governors".[2][3] In 1979, the constitution was amended to make this more specific: in the event of the governor's death, resignation, or removal from office, the lieutenant governor becomes governor; in the event of the governor's impeachment, absence, or incapacity, the lieutenant governor becomes acting governor until the governor is again able to serve.[1]

Under the original terms of the state constitution, the lieutenant governor was elected for a two-year term on a separate ticket from the governor;[1] because of this, the Governor and Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin have not always been of the same party. After a 1967 amendment, however, the two have been nominated, and voted upon, as a single ticket. Another 1967 amendment increased the terms of both the governor and lieutenant governor to four years. There is no limit to the number of terms a lieutenant governor may hold.[1]

The original constitution made no provision for a vacancy in the office of the lieutenant governor; in the event of the lieutenant governor's death or resignation, the lieutenant governorship usually remained vacant until the end of the term. In 1938, following the resignation of lieutenant governor Henry Gunderson, Governor Philip La Follette appointed Herman Ekern lieutenant governor to fill the vacancy. This appointment was challenged in court, and ruled valid in the case State ex rel. Martin v. Ekern.[3] In 1979 the constitution was amended to explicitly allow this: in the event of a vacancy in the office of the lieutenant governor, the governor nominates a candidate who becomes lieutenant governor for the remainder of the term upon his approval by the Wisconsin Assembly and Wisconsin State Senate.[4]

Forty-one individuals have held the office of lieutenant governor since Wisconsin's admission to the Union in 1848, two of whom—Warren Knowles and Jack Olson—have served for non-consecutive terms. The first lieutenant governor was John Holmes, who took office on June 7, 1848. The current lieutenant governor is Rebecca Kleefisch, who took office on January 3, 2011; her term expires in 2015.[2]

Lieutenant Governors of Wisconsin[edit]

From 1836, until 1848, what is now Wisconsin was part of Wisconsin Territory.[5] There was no position of "Territorial Lieutenant Governor"; however, the territory had a Secretary who was similar in that one of his functions was to assume the powers and duties of the territorial governor if he were unable to carry them out.[6] For the secretaries from the territorial period, see the List of Secretaries of Wisconsin Territory.

Wisconsin was admitted to the Union on May 29, 1848. Since then, it has had 41 lieutenant governors, two of whom have served non-consecutive terms.[2]

      Democratic       Whig       Republican       Progressive

Arthur MacArthur, Sr., 5th lieutenant governor of Wisconsin
Edward Salomon, 8th lieutenant governor of Wisconsin
Thaddeus Pound, 10th lieutenant governor of Wisconsin
# Name Party Took office Left office[note 1] Governor Terms[note 2]
1 John E. Holmes Democratic June 7, 1848[7] January 7, 1850 Nelson Dewey 1
2 Samuel W. Beall Democratic January 7, 1850[7] January 5, 1852 Nelson Dewey 1
3 Timothy Burns Democratic January 5, 1852[7] September 21, 1853[8] Leonard Farwell 12[note 3]
vacant September 21, 1853 January 2, 1854 Leonard Farwell 12[note 4]
4 James T. Lewis Republican January 2, 1854[7] January 7, 1856 William Barstow 1
5 Arthur MacArthur, Sr. Democratic January 7, 1856[7] March 21, 1856[2] William Barstow 13[note 5]
MacArthur acting as governor[note 6] March 21, 1856 March 25, 1856 Arthur MacArthur, Sr. 13[note 7]
Arthur MacArthur, Sr. Democrat March 25, 1856[2] January 4, 1858 Coles Bashford 13[note 5]
6 Erasmus D. Campbell Democratic January 4, 1858[7] January 2, 1860 Alexander Randall 1
7 Butler G. Noble Republican January 2, 1860[7] January 6, 1862 Alexander Randall 1
8 Edward Salomon Republican January 6, 1862[7] April 19, 1862[2] Louis Harvey[note 3] 12
Salomon acting as governor[note 6] April 19, 1862 January 4, 1864 Edward Salomon 12[note 7]
vacant January 4, 1864 by January 13, 1864[note 8] James Lewis 12
9 Wyman Spooner Republican by January 13, 1864[note 8] January 3, 1870 James Lewis 212
Lucius Fairchild
10 Thaddeus C. Pound Republican January 3, 1870[7] January 1, 1872 Lucius Fairchild 1
11 Milton H. Pettit Republican January 1, 1872[7] March 23, 1873[2] Cadwallader Washburn 12[note 3]
vacant March 23, 1873 January 5, 1874 Cadwallader Washburn 12[note 4]
12 Charles D. Parker Democratic January 5, 1874[7] January 7, 1878 William Taylor 2
Harrison Ludington
13 James M. Bingham Republican January 7, 1878[7] January 2, 1882 William Smith 2
14 Sam S. Fifield Republican January 2, 1882[7] January 3, 1887 Jeremiah Rusk 2[note 9]
15 George W. Ryland Republican January 3, 1887[7] January 5, 1891 Jeremiah Rusk 2
William Hoard
16 Charles Jonas Democratic January 5, 1891[7] April 4, 1894[7] George Peck 112[note 10]
vacant April 4, 1894 January 7, 1895 George Peck 12[note 11]
17 Emil Baensch Republican January 7, 1895[note 12] January 2, 1899 William Upham 2
Edward Scofield
18 Jesse Stone Republican January 2, 1899[7] May 11, 1902[14] Edward Scofield 112[note 3]
Robert La Follette, Sr.
vacant May 11, 1902 January 5, 1903 Robert La Follette, Sr. 12[note 4]
19 James O. Davidson Republican January 5, 1903[2] January 1, 1906[2] Robert La Follette, Sr.[note 10] 112
Davidson acting as governor[note 6] January 1, 1906 January 7, 1907 James Davidson 12[note 7]
20 William D. Connor Republican January 7, 1907[7] January 4, 1909 James Davidson 1
21 John Strange Republican January 4, 1909[7] January 2, 1911 James Davidson 1
22 Thomas Morris Republican January 2, 1911[7] January 4, 1915 Francis McGovern 2
23 Edward F. Dithmar Republican January 4, 1915[7] January 3, 1921 Emanuel Philipp 3
24 George F. Comings Republican January 3, 1921[7] January 5, 1925 John Blaine 2
25 Henry A. Huber Republican January 5, 1925[7] January 2, 1933 John Blaine 4
Fred R. Zimmerman
Walter Kohler, Sr.
Philip La Follette
26 Thomas J. O'Malley Democratic January 2, 1933[15] May 27, 1936[16] Albert Schmedeman 112[note 3]
Philip La Follette
vacant May 27, 1936 January 4, 1937 Philip La Follette 12[note 4]
27 Henry A. Gunderson Progressive January 4, 1937[17] October 16, 1937[2] Philip La Follette 13[note 10]
vacant October 16, 1937 May 16, 1938 Philip La Follette 13[note 11]
28 Herman L. Ekern Progressive May 16, 1938[2] January 2, 1939 Philip La Follette 13[note 13]
29 Walter S. Goodland Republican January 2, 1939[18] January 4, 1943[2] Julius Heil 2
Goodland acting as governor[note 6] January 4, 1943 January 1, 1945 Walter Goodland 1[note 14]
30 Oscar Rennebohm Republican January 1, 1945[19] March 12, 1947[2] Walter Goodland[note 3] 112
Rennebohm acting as governor[note 6] March 12, 1947 January 3, 1949 Oscar Rennebohm 12[note 7]
31 George M. Smith Republican January 3, 1949[20] January 3, 1955 Oscar Rennebohm 3
Walter Kohler, Jr.
32 Warren P. Knowles Republican January 3, 1955[21] January 5, 1959 Walter Kohler, Jr. 2
Vernon Thomson
33 Philleo Nash Democratic January 5, 1959[22] January 2, 1961 Gaylord Nelson 1
34 Warren P. Knowles Republican January 2, 1961[23] January 7, 1963 Gaylord Nelson 1
35 Jack B. Olson Republican January 7, 1963[24] January 4, 1965 John Reynolds 1
36 Patrick J. Lucey Democratic January 4, 1965[25] January 2, 1967 Warren Knowles 1
37 Jack B. Olson Republican January 2, 1967[26] January 4, 1971 Warren Knowles 2
38 Martin J. Schreiber Democratic January 4, 1971[27] July 6, 1977[2] Patrick Lucey[note 10] 112[note 15]
Schreiber acting as governor[note 6] July 6, 1977 January 3, 1979 Martin Schreiber 12[note 7]
39 Russell A. Olson Republican January 3, 1979[28] January 3, 1983 Lee Dreyfus 1
40 James T. Flynn Democratic January 3, 1983[29] January 5, 1987 Anthony Earl 1
41 Scott McCallum Republican January 5, 1987[30] February 1, 2001[2] Tommy Thompson[note 10] 313
vacant February 1, 2001 May 9, 2001 Scott McCallum 13[note 16]
42 Margaret A. Farrow Republican May 9, 2001[2] January 6, 2003 Scott McCallum 13[note 13]
43 Barbara Lawton Democratic January 6, 2003[31] January 3, 2011 Jim Doyle 2[note 17]
44 Rebecca Kleefisch Republican January 3, 2011 Incumbent Scott Walker

Living former lieutenant governors[edit]

As of August 2014, five former lieutenant governors are alive, the oldest being Margaret Farrow (2001–2003, born 1934). The most recent death of a former lieutenant governor was that of Patrick Lucey (1965–1969), on May 10, 2014, the most recently serving lt. governor to die was Russell Olson (1979–1983) on April 14, 2010.

Name Lieutenant Gubernatorial term Date of birth
Martin J. Schreiber 1971–1977 (1939-04-08) April 8, 1939 (age 75)
James T. Flynn 1983–1987 (1944-09-25) September 25, 1944 (age 69)
Scott McCallum 1987–2001 (1950-05-02) May 2, 1950 (age 64)
Margaret Farrow 2001–2003 (1934-11-28) November 28, 1934 (age 79)
Barbara Lawton 2003–2011 (1951-07-05) July 5, 1951 (age 63)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ When there is no evidence to the contrary, it is assumed that lieutenant governors left office the same day their successors were sworn in.
  2. ^ The fractional terms of some lieutenant governors are not to be understood absolutely literally; rather, they are meant to show single terms during which multiple lieutenant governors served, due to resignations, deaths, and delayed inaugurations.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Died in office.
  4. ^ a b c d Vacant due to death of lieutenant governor.
  5. ^ a b MacArthur was elected lieutenant governor in the 1855 election; initially Barstow was declared the winner of the gubernatorial election, but when he resigned amid claims that he had won by fraudulent means, MacArthur began to act as governor. After five days, the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled that Bartow's opponent, Bashford, was the legitimate governor, at which point MacArthur returned to serving as lieutenant governor.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Periods during which the liutenant governor acted as governor are listed only if they would have caused the lieutenant governor to become governor had the 1979 amendment existed during that time; that is, those resulting from the death, resignation, or removal of the governor. Those resulting from the governor's temporary absence from the state, impeachment, or his inability to serve due to illness are not listed.
  7. ^ a b c d e Note that when lieutenant governors are acting as governors, they technically continue to be lieutenant governors. However, in order to avoid confusion, they are here listed as governors only. Some sources will include these periods in the lieutenant governors' terms of office.[2]
  8. ^ a b Governor Lewis was sworn in on January 4,[2] but Lieutenant Governor Spooner was not.[9] Contemporary newspaper articles dated January 13 refer to him as "lieutenant governor",[10][11] suggesting that he was sworn in before that day. However, the Wisconsin Blue Books variously give his date of inauguration as January 1,[12] January 14,[7] or list only the year, 1864.[2]
  9. ^ During Fifield's first term, the Wisconsin Constitution was amended to say that all elections of state and county officers would henceforth take place in even-numbered years. By the provisions of the amendment, the terms of all officials who would have left office in 1884, including Fifield, were extended by one year.
  10. ^ a b c d e Resigned from office.
  11. ^ a b Vacant due to resignation of lieutenant governor.
  12. ^ Governor Upham was sworn in on January 7.[2] Contemporary newspaper accounts indicate that Lieutenant Governor Baensch was sworn in on the same day;[13] however, the Wisconsin Blue Book states that he was inaugurated on January 8.[7]
  13. ^ a b Appointed to fill vacancy.
  14. ^ Goodland was re-elected lieutenant governor in the 1942 election, and Orland Loomis was elected governor. When Loomis died before taking office, Goodland acted as governor for the entire term, per a ruling of the Wisconsin Supreme Court.
  15. ^ As per a 1967 amendment to the Wisconsin Constitution, Schreiber's first term was the first lieutenant gubernatorial term to last for 4 years.
  16. ^ Vacant due to lieutenant governor becoming governor for remainder of unexpired term.
  17. ^ Lieutenant Governor Lawton's second term expires on January 3, 2011.

Other high offices held[edit]

This is a table of governorships, congressional seats and other federal offices, and ranking diplomatic positions in foreign countries held by former Wisconsin lieutenant governors.[3]

Name Term Other offices held
James Lewis 1854–1856 Governor of Wisconsin
Arthur MacArthur, Sr. 1856 Acting Governor of Wisconsin;[† 1] Justice of the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia
Edward Salomon 1862 Acting Governor of Wisconsin[† 1]
Thaddeus Pound 1870–1872 Representative from Wisconsin
James Davidson 1903–1906 Acting Governor of Wisconsin;[† 1] Governor of Wisconsin
Walter Goodland 1939–1943 Acting Governor of Wisconsin;[† 1] Governor of Wisconsin
Oscar Rennebohm 1945–1947 Acting Governor of Wisconsin;[† 1] Governor of Wisconsin
Warren Knowles 1955–1959
1961–1963
Governor of Wisconsin
Jack Olson 1963–1965
1967–1971
Ambassador to the Bahamas
Patrick Lucey 1965–1967 Governor of Wisconsin; Ambassador to Mexico
Martin Schreiber 1971–1977 Acting Governor of Wisconsin[† 1]
Scott McCallum 1987–2001 Governor of Wisconsin[† 1][† 2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Lieutenant governor resigned or otherwise left office to take this position.
  2. ^ Due to a 1979 amendment to the Wisconsin Constitution, Scott McCallum became governor, rather than acting as governor, upon the resignation of Governor Tommy Thompson.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d e "Chapter 3: Wisconsin Constitution (Article V)" (PDF). State of Wisconsin Blue Book 2007–2008. pp. 213–215. Retrieved 2008-01-15. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t "Chapter 8: Statistical Information on Wisconsin" (PDF). State of Wisconsin Blue Book 2007–2008. pp. 720–723. Retrieved 2008-01-14. 
  3. ^ a b c "Previous Lieutenant Governors". Office of the Lieutenant Governor. 2007-04-23. Retrieved 2008-01-25. 
  4. ^ Barish, Lawrence S. (ed.) (2007). "Chapter 3: Wisconsin Constitution (Article XIII)". State of Wisconsin Blue Book 2007–2008 (PDF). Madison, Wisconsin: Wisconsin Legislative Reference Bureau. pp. 234–235. ISBN 978-0-9752820-2-1. Retrieved 2008-02-24. 
  5. ^ "Chapter 8: Statistical Information on Wisconsin" (PDF). State of Wisconsin Blue Book 2007–2008. p. 692. Retrieved 2008-02-25. 
  6. ^ Tuttle, Charles Richard (1875). An Illustrated History of the State of Wisconsin. Boston, Massachusetts: B. B. Russell. p. 189. Retrieved 2008-02-24. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Anderson, William J.; William A. Anderson (ed.) (1929). The Wisconsin blue book, 1929. Madison, Wisconsin: Democrat Printing Company. p. 136. Retrieved 2008-01-27. 
  8. ^ The History of Racine and Kenosha Counties, Wisconsin. Racine County, Wisconsin: Western Historical Company. 1879. p. 62. Retrieved 2008-01-14. 
  9. ^ "Inaugurated" (PDF). The Waukesha Freeman (Waukesha, Wisconsin). January 5, 1864. p. 2. Retrieved 2008-02-25. 
  10. ^ "Wisconsin Legislature" (PDF). Wisconsin State Journal (Madison, Wisconsin). January 13, 1864. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-02-25. 
  11. ^ "Wisconsin Legislature" (PDF). Janesville Daily Gazette (Janesville, Wisconsin). January 15, 1864. p. 2. Retrieved 2008-02-25. 
  12. ^ Stewart, Frank M.; E. W. Young (eds.) (1866). The legislative manual, of the state of Wisconsin; comprising Jefferson's manual, rules, forms, and laws, for the regulation of business; also, lists and tables for reference. Madison, Wisconsin: Wm. J. Park, State Printer. p. 148. Retrieved 2008-02-26. 
  13. ^ "UPHAM INAUGURATED" (PDF). The Centralia Enterprise and Tribune. January 12, 1895. p. 6. Retrieved 2008-02-25. 
  14. ^ "Lieut. Gov. Stone Dead" (PDF). New York Times. May 12, 1902. p. 9. Retrieved 2008-01-23. 
  15. ^ "Governor Takes Oath Amid Cheers of 5,000" (PDF). Wisconsin State Journal. January 3, 1933. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  16. ^ "Lieutenant Governor O'Malley Dead" (PDF). La Crosse Tribune and Leader-Press. May 27, 1936. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-01-23. 
  17. ^ "New Administrations Started" (PDF). The Oshkosh Northwestern. January 4, 1937. p. 6. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  18. ^ "Mayor's Brother Is Lieutenant Governor" (PDF). Appleton Post-Crescent. January 3, 1939. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  19. ^ "Badger Officials Are Inaugurated" (PDF). Ironwood Daily Globe. January 2, 1945. p. 2. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  20. ^ "Rennebohm Inaugurated for Own Term as Governor" (PDF). Waukesha Daily Freeman. January 3, 1949. p. 2. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  21. ^ "Gov. Kohler, Four State Officers Are Inaugurated" (PDF). The Sheboygan Press. January 3, 1955. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  22. ^ "Gaylord Nelson Becomes State's 34th Governor" (PDF). Stevens Point Daily Journal. January 5, 1959. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  23. ^ "Nelson Calls for Unity" (PDF). Wisconsin State Journal. January 3, 1961. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  24. ^ "Reynolds Calls for Unity At Inaugural Ceremonies" (PDF). Oshkosh Daily Northwestern. January 7, 1963. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  25. ^ "Knowles Seeks State's Aid in Move Forward" (PDF). Wisconsin State Journal. January 5, 1965. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  26. ^ "Knowles Is Sworn In" (PDF). The Holland Evening Sentinel. January 3, 1967. p. 8. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  27. ^ "Lucey Hopes to Bridge Troubled State Waters" (PDF). Wisconsin State Journal. January 5, 1971. p. 1. Retrieved 2008-02-23. 
  28. ^ "Inaugural Caps Dreyfus Miracle" (PDF). Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan). January 4, 1979. p. 3. Retrieved 2008-01-27. 
  29. ^ "Earl discusses financial crunch" (PDF). Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan). January 4, 1983. p. 11. Retrieved 2010-04-21. 
  30. ^ "State needs new ideas, says Wisconsin governor" (PDF). Ironwood Daily Globe (Ironwood, Michigan). January 5, 1987. p. 6. Retrieved 2008-01-27. 
  31. ^ Walters, Steven (January 7, 2003). "The guard changes". The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (Milwaukee, Wisconsin). p. 1A. Retrieved 2008-01-27.