Mississippi's 2nd congressional district

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Mississippi's 2nd congressional district
Mississippi's 2nd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Mississippi's 2nd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Bennie Thompson (DBolton)
Area 14,519.68 mi² (37,605.80 km²)
Distribution 62.67% urban, 37.33% rural
Population (2006) 711,164
Median income $26,894
Ethnicity 35.0% White, 63.5% Black, 0.4% Asian, 1.2% Hispanic, 0.2% Native American, 0.6% other
Cook PVI D+10[1]

Mississippi's 2nd congressional district (MS-2) is the only majority-black district in the state, covering much of western Mississippi. The district includes most of Jackson, the riverfront cities of Greenville and Vicksburg, and the interior market cities of Clarksdale, Greenwood, and Clinton. The district is approximately 275 miles (443 km) long, 180 miles (290 km) wide and borders the Mississippi River; it encompasses much of the Mississippi Delta, and a total of 15 counties and parts of several others.

From statehood to the election of 1846, Mississippi elected representatives at-large statewide on a general ticket.

Following Reconstruction and the Democratic Party's regaining control of the state legislature, it redefined congressional districts to reduce Republican voting strength. Most blacks were covered by a 'shoestring' Congressional district running the length of the Mississippi River, leaving five other districts with white majorities.[2] With passage of the 1890 constitution and other measures, the Democratic-dominated legislature effectively disfranchised most blacks and poor whites for decades, subduing the Republican and Populist movements.[3]

The districts have been redefined over the years to reflect populations changes in the state, and districts 5 through 8 were reallocated to the 1st, 3rd and 4th. This Mississippi River-bounded district continues to have a black-majority population. In the southern realignment of political parties, black residents here have consistently supported Democratic party candidates.

Its current representative is Democrat Bennie Thompson.

Mississippi's 2nd congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bennie Thompson (inc.) 105,327 61.47%
Republican Bill Marcy 64,499 37.64%
Reform Ashley Norwood 1,530 0.89%
Totals 171,356 100.00%
Democratic hold

Election results[edit]

2008[edit]

United States House election, 2008: Mississippi District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Bennie G. Thompson 201,606 69.05 +4.78
Republican Richard Cook 90,364 30.95 -4.78
Turnout 291,970
Majority 111,242 38.10

2006[edit]

United States House election, 2006: Mississippi District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Bennie G. Thompson 100,168 64.27 +5.89
Republican Yvonne R. Brown 55,672 35.73 -4.91
Turnout 155,832
Majority 44,496 28.55

2004[edit]

United States House election, 2004: Mississippi District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Bennie G. Thompson 154,626 58.38 +3.24
Republican Clinton B. LeSueur 107,647 40.64 -2.11
Reform Shawn O'Hara 2,596 0.98 -1.12
Turnout 264,869
Majority 46,979 17.74

2002[edit]

United States House election, 2002: Mississippi District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Bennie G. Thompson 89,913 55.14 -9.93
Republican Clinton B. LeSueur 69,711 42.75 +11.54
Reform Lee F. Dilworth 3,426 2.10 +0.87
Turnout 163,050
Majority 20,202 12.39

2000[edit]

United States House election, 2000: Mississippi District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Bennie G. Thompson 112,777 65.07
Republican Hardy Caraway 54,090 31.21
Libertarian William G. Chipman 4,305 2.48
Reform Lee F. Dilworth 2,135 1.23
Turnout 173,307
Majority 58,687 33.86

List of representatives[edit]

Name Years of Service Party District Home Notes
District created March 4, 1845
Stephen Adams.jpgStephen Adams March 4, 1845 - March 3, 1847 Democratic
Winfield Scott Featherston.jpgWinfield S. Featherston March 4, 1847 - March 3, 1851 Democratic
No image.svgJohn A. Wilcox March 4, 1851 - March 3, 1853 Unionist
No image.svgWilliam T. S. Barry March 4, 1853 - March 3, 1855 Democratic
No image.svgHendley S. Bennett March 4, 1855 - March 3, 1857 Democratic
Reuben Davis.jpgReuben Davis March 4, 1857 - January 12, 1861 Democratic Withdrew
Civil War and Reconstruction
No image.svgJoseph L. Morphis February 23, 1870 - March 3, 1873 Republican
No image.svg Albert R. Howe March 4, 1873 - March 3, 1875 Republican
No image.svgG. Wiley Wells March 4, 1875 - March 3, 1877 Independent Republican
VanHManning.jpgVan H. Manning March 4, 1877 - March 3, 1883 Democratic
Vacant March 4, 1883 - June 25, 1884
JamesRonaldChalmersp157crop.jpgJames R. Chalmers June 25, 1884 - March 3, 1885 Independent Seated after contested election with Van H. Manning
No image.svgJames B. Morgan March 4, 1885 - March 3, 1891 Democratic
No image.svgJohn C. Kyle March 4, 1891 - March 3, 1897 Democratic
WVA Sullivan.jpgWilliam V. Sullivan March 4, 1897 - May 31, 1898 Democratic Appointed U.S. Senator
Vacant May 31, 1898 - July 5, 1898
No image.svgThomas Spight July 5, 1898 - March 3, 1911 Democratic
HubertDStephens.jpgHubert D. Stephens March 4, 1911 - March 3, 1921 Democratic
No image.svgBill G. Lowrey March 4, 1921 - March 3, 1929 Democratic
U.S. Senator Wall Doxey (D-MS).jpgWall Doxey March 4, 1929 - September 23, 1941 Democratic Elected to U.S. Senate
Vacant September 23, 1941 - November 4, 1941
Jamie L. Whitten.jpgJamie Whitten November 4, 1941 - January 3, 1973 Democratic Redistricted to the 1st district
Bowen DR.pngDavid R. Bowen January 3, 1973 - January 3, 1983 Democratic
Webb Franklin.pngWilliam Franklin January 3, 1983 - January 3, 1987 Republican
Mike Espy.jpgMike Espy January 3, 1987 - January 22, 1993 Democratic Resigned after being appointed as United States Secretary of Agriculture
Vacant January 22, 1993 - April 13, 1993
Bennie Thompson, official portrait, 111th Congress.jpgBennie Thompson April 13, 1993–Present Democratic Incumbent

Historical district boundaries[edit]

2003 - 2013

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008". The Cook Political Report. 2012. Retrieved 2013-01-10. 
  2. ^ Eric Foner, Reconstruction, 1863-1877, New York: Perennial Classics, p. 590
  3. ^ Michael Perman, Struggle for Mastery: Disfranchisement in the South, 1888-1908 (2000), ch 4.

Coordinates: 33°10′35″N 90°21′03″W / 33.17639°N 90.35083°W / 33.17639; -90.35083