Toyota Verossa

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Toyota Verossa
Toyota Verossa 01.jpg
Overview
Manufacturer Kanto Auto Works[1]
Production 2001-2003
Assembly Iwate, Japan
Body and chassis
Body style 4-door sedan
Platform Front Engine, Rear-wheel/All-wheel Drive
Related Toyota Mark II
Powertrain
Engine 1G-FE 2.0 litre inline six, 160 PS
1JZ-FSE 2.5 litre direct-injection inline six, 200 PS
1JZ-GTE 2.5 litre turbocharged inline six, 280 PS
Transmission 4-speed automatic
5-speed manual
5-speed automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase 2,781 mm (109.5 in)
Length 4,704 mm (185.2 in)
Width 1,758 mm (69.2 in)
Height 1,450 mm (57.1 in)
Curb weight 1,383–1,538 kg (3,050–3,390 lb)
Chronology
Predecessor Toyota Chaser
Toyota Cresta
Successor Toyota Mark X

The Toyota Verossa was a sedan produced by the Toyota Motor Company for Japanese domestic market, and was exclusive to Toyota Vista Store Japanese locations. The Verossa exceeded Japanese government regulations concerning external dimensions and engine displacement, offering buyers a sedan that continued to offer a front engine rear drive platform, opposite the 2001-2006 Toyota Camry with very similar dimensions and front wheel drive. The advantage the Verossa offered over the Camry was the ability to offer all wheel drive, which the Camry couldn't do. The Verossa appeared in conjunction with the Toyopet Store alternative called the Progrès, and the Toyota Store Brevis.

Toyota replaced the aging Toyota Mark II stablemates, the Chaser and Cresta which ended production together in 2000, combining the sporting aspects of the Chaser with the high luxury content of the Cresta, in a vehicle that was smaller than the Toyota Crown, a favorite with Japanese luxury car buyers for decades. The Verossa was a larger version of the Toyota Altezza that appeared in 1998 that became a sales success, offering high performance and luxury with a straight 6 engine and rear drive. The Verossa shared its X-chassis model code with its predecessors and also featured the front-engine rear-drive layout. The Verossa's production ceased in 2003 due to poor sales.

Trim Levels[edit]

The Verossa was sold in six trim levels featuring 3 straight 6 engine and 3 transmission types. All-wheel drive was offered on some trim levels, but only available with an automatic transmission. Standard equipment and options throughout the Verossa's range included a front stabilizer bar, navigation, power seats and fully automatic air conditioning.

20, 20Four and 20Four G Package[edit]

The entry level Verossa came equipped with Toyota's 1G-FE engine producing 160 PS (118 kW; 158 hp) at 6200 rpm and 200 N·m (148 lb·ft) at 4400 rpm. The 20 was only available with an electronically controlled 4-speed automatic transmission. The 20Four and 20Four G package offered permanent all-wheel drive. The G Package included aesthetic accoutrement like alloy wheels and leather seats.

25 and V25[edit]

These models featured Toyota's 1JZ engine with direct injection rated at 200 PS (147 kW; 197 hp) at 6000 rpm and 250 N·m (184 lb·ft) at 3800 rpm. Both came with a 5-speed electronically controlled automatic, differentiating them from the 1G-quipped Verossa's. The more up-market V25 featured a rear-stabilizer bar in addition to the front stabilizer bar found in the 2.0L Verossa's, along with larger 17" wheels and leather seating option.

VR25[edit]

A throwback to the Tourer V, the VR25 featured the same turbocharged 1JZ-GTE engine on a rear-drive chassis setup. The engine produced 280 PS (206 kW; 276 hp) at 6200 rpm and 377 N·m (278 lb·ft) at 2400 rpm and was mated to either a 5-speed manual or the same 4-speed as found in the 2.0L models with a standard limited-slip differential. As per the V25, the VR25 came with front and rear strut-tower bars and 17" wheels; leather was an option as were front and rear spoilers.

Sources[edit]

  • Toyota Verossa, Japanese sales brochure #VQ0018-0107 (2001)

Toyota Verossa on Cars Directory, http://www.cars-directory.net/specs/toyota/verossa/2001_7/

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.kanto-aw.co.jp/en/history/