U.S. Route 27 in Michigan

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This article is about the former section of highway in Michigan. For the entire length of the current highway, see US Highway 27.

US Highway 27 marker

US Highway 27
Route information
Maintained by MDOT
Length: 218.195 mi[4] (351.151 km)
Existed: November 26, 1926 (1926-11-26)[1][2] – April 16, 1999 (1999-04-16)[5]
History: Signs were removed in 2002[3]
Major junctions
South end: I-69 / US 27 at Indiana state line
 

US 12 near Coldwater
I‑94 in Marshall
I‑96 near Lansing
I‑69 / US 127 near East Lansing

US 10 near Clare
North end: I‑75 near Grayling
Location
Counties: Branch, Calhoun, Eaton, Clinton, Gratiot, Isabella, Clare, Roscommon, Crawford
Highway system
M-26 M-27

US Highway 27 (US 27) is a part of the US Highway System that now runs from Miami, Florida, to Fort Wayne, Indiana. In the US state of Michigan, it was a state trunkline highway that entered the state south of Kinderhook and ended south of Grayling. Its route consisted of a freeway concurrency with Interstate 69 (I-69) from the state line north to the Lansing area before it followed its own freeway facility northward to St. Johns. From there north to Ithaca, US 27 was an expressway before continuing as a freeway to a terminus south of Grayling.

Created with the rest of the US Highway System on November 11, 1926, US 27 replaced a pair of state highways between the state line and the Cheboygan area. For a time, US 27 even extended from Cheboygan to St. Ignace over the Mackinac Bridge. The highway was converted into a series of freeways starting in the late 1950s. The northernmost section between Grayling and Mackinaw City, bypassing Cheboygan, became part of I-75, and US 27 was truncated to Grayling. Starting in the 1960s, the southern sections were included in I-69. The last section of Interstate in Michigan was completed in 1992 when I-69/US 27 opened southwest of Lansing. In the 1990s, a bypass of St. Johns north of Lansing was built, the last freeway segment of US 27 to open under that designation. On April 16, 1999, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) approved the removal of the US 27 designation from the state of Michigan; this change was put into place when the highway number was removed from signage in 2002. Former segments of US 27 from its pre-freeway configuration are still state highways in the form of M-27 between Indian River and Cheboygan or the various business routes in the state that previously bore Business US 27 (BUS US 27) designations.

Route description[edit]

Southern Michigan[edit]

I-69/US 27 in Michigan began at the Indiana state line southeast of Kinderhook, just north of an interchange with the Indiana Toll Road (I-80/I-90). From there, I-69/US 27 ran northward through a mixture of Southern Michigan farmland and woodland in Branch County. A few miles north of the state line, the freeway passes Coldwater Lake State Park and its namesake body of water; north of the lake, there is a welcome center for the northbound lanes. I-69/US 27 curved around the east side of Coldwater, connecting to the city's business loop on the south of town. The freeway intersects the northern end of the business loop immediately east of downtown at an interchange that also features US 12 (Chicago Road). A third interchange, some three miles (4.8 km) further north, features a distribution center for Walmart stores in the region. Further north, the freeway curves around to the northwest into Calhoun County and crosses over the St. Joseph River. I-69/US 27 turned back northward and bypassed Tekonsha to the town's west, intersecting M-60 in the process.[6][7]

Curving around Nottawa Lake, I-69/US 27 continued northward through southern Calhoun County. It passed through an interchange that marked the southern terminus of M-227, a highway that runs northward into Marshall. The freeway crosses the Kalamazoo River and through an interchange with M-96 west of downtown Marshall. From that interchange northward, the BL I-94 designation was overlaid on I-69/US 27; the business loop ends at the cloverleaf interchange with I-94 northwest of Marshall. North of I-94, I-69/US 27 had one more interchange before crossing into Eaton County.[6][7]

Aerial view looking north from the I-496 interchange along I-96/I-69/US 27 west of Lansing

In southern Eaton County, the freeway parallels the Battle Creek River north of the junction with M-78. Near Olivet, I-69/US 27 began to turn in a northeasterly direction. As it continued in that direction, it ran to the north side of Olivet. On the south side of Charlotte, I-69/US 27 turned northward, traversing an area to the east of downtown and crossing the former routing of US 27, which is now part of the business loop for the city. Further north, the freeway has a junction with M-50, a bridge over the Battle Creek River, and an interchange with the northern end of the business loop next to Fitch H. Beach Airport. North of the airport, I-69/US 27 turned northeasterly again and paralleled Lansing Road, the former route of US 27/M-78. The freeway meets the southern end of M-100 near Potterville and continues onto the Lansing–East Lansing metropolitan area. Southwest of the state's capital city, I-69/US 27 crossed over Lansing Road near Lansing Delta Township Assembly, a factory for General Motors; northeast of the complex, I-69/US 27 merged into I-96. The combined I-96/I-69/US 27 ran northward through the suburban edges of the Lansing area, intersecting the western ends of I-496 and the BL I-69 for Lansing. The freeway enters Clinton County, and just north of a crossing of the Grand River, I-69/US 27 turned eastward to separate from I-96. As a part of the larger interchange with I-96, I-69/US 27 crossed BL I-96 (Grand River Avenue) without any connections.[6][7]

Mid-Michigan to Grayling[edit]

After leaving the I-96 concurrency, I-69 changes cardinal orientation and is signed as east–west from that point on. The freeway continues parallel to the Looking Glass River through suburban areas north of Capital Region International Airport. North of East Lansing, I-69/US 27 met US 127 at a cloverleaf interchange, and US 27 turned northward to separate from I-69. The US 27 freeway ran through farmland and crossed the Looking Glass River. At Price Road, US 27 met its southernmost business loop, the BUS US 27 for St. Johns. The freeway continues due north and intersects M-21 east of town before it turns northwesterly to round the northern side of St. Johns. North of downtown, US 27 met the northern end of the business loop and the freeway ends. Continuing northward as an expressway, the highway has four lanes divided by a median with at-grade intersections at the cross roads.[6][7]

In Gratiot County, US 27 was named Bagley Road. North of Wilson Road, the expressway crosses the Maple River on a causeway through a wetland area in the Maple River State Game Area.[6][7] North of the river, the expressway crosses a branch line of the Great Lakes Central Railroad,[7][8] then has an interchange with M-57. About six miles (9.7 km) further north, US 27 turned to the northwest, separating from Bagley Road. The expressway transitions back to a full freeway as the trunkline turns north and curves around the east side of Ithaca, meeting the southern end of Ithaca's business loop at Center Road, and the opposite end north of town.[6][7]

Further north, US 27 angled northwesterly between Alma and St. Louis. Each city has its own business loop, accessible on the south side through a pair of partial interchanges at Lincoln and State roads. The freeway crosses the Pine River before intersecting M-46 and the two business loops at another pair of interchanges north of downtown Alma. After US 27 crossed into Isabella County, it turned northwesterly near Shepherd. After a few miles, a short freeway spur carrying the BUS US 27 for Mount Pleasant splits off and the main freeway turns back to the north. The two highways continue in parallel through town before turning to converge north of Mount Pleasant by the airport. After the freeway stub at the northern end of the business loop merges in, the main freeway crosses the Chippewa River.[6][7]

US 27 continued through northern Isabella County to pass east of Rosebush. South of the Clare County line in Clare, US 27 met the southern end of Clare's BUS US 27. The freeway turns northeasterly, crosses BUS US 10 and the county line before merging with US 10. US 27/US 10 curved around Lake Shamrock on the northern end of town before meeting the northern end of BUS US 27/BUS US 10. The freeway continues north, past a welcome center in the median, and US 10 splits off to the west.[6][7]

North of Clare, US 27 ran through forest, where it passed to the east of Harrison. On the east side of that town, the freeway crosses between Little Long and Sutherland lakes before meeting the northern end of the Harrison business loop. The freeway then crosses into Roscommon County. East of the community of Houghton Lake Heights and the city of Houghton Lake, US 27 intersected M-55. North of that interchange, the freeway parallels the western shore of Houghton Lake and crosses the Muskegon River. The freeway then turns a bit northeasterly toward Higgins Lake and follows that lake's western shore before crossing into Crawford County. Once across the county line, US 27 curved around to the northeast for about 5 12 miles (8.9 km) before terminating at I-75 south of Grayling.[6][7]

History[edit]

Predecessor highways[edit]

Map of the pre-statehood Indian trails

The first major overland transportation corridors in the future state of Michigan were the Indian trails.[9] Only one of these followed part of the path of US 27; the Mackinac Trail roughy paralleled the route of US 27 from Grayling north.[10]

The State Trunkline Highway System was created on May 13, 1913, by an act of the Michigan Legislature; at the time, no one of the system's divisions corresponded to US 27. Division 3 followed a course from Lansing northward to an intersection with Division 2. Combined with the northernmost sections of Division 2 to the Straits of Mackinac, these highways roughly described the future route of US 27.[11] In 1919, the Michigan State Highway Department (MSHD)[a] signposted the highway system for the first time,[14] and two different highways followed sections of the future US 27 corridor. The original M-29 ran from the Indiana state line north to Lansing. The second highway was M-14 from Lansing north to Cheboygan.[15]

United States Numbered Highways era[edit]

The US 27 marker originally used in Michigan

On November 11, 1926, the United States Numbered Highway System was approved by the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO),[1][b] and the new US 27 replaced M-29 from the state line northward to Lansing; from Lansing northward, US 27 replaced M-14 to Cheboygan.[17] By the end of the next year, M-78 was extended from Charlotte along US 27 to run north and east of Lansing to a junction with M-47 near Pittsburg.[18] In 1929, the route of US 27/M-18 was realigned south of Roscommon on the east side of Higgins Lake. The same year, another realignment moved US 27 to run due north from the ClintonGratiot county line to M-43 at Ithaca, and a third change rounded a corner near Shepherd in Isabella County.[19][20]

When a new roadway was built in the St. Louis area in 1930, the former routing into Alma was redesignated US 27A; another US 27A was created in Shepherd around the same time.[21][22] By the middle of 1936, the US 27/M-78 routing through Lansing was split into two. The mainline was restricted to cars only and moved to run along Capitol Avenue. The former routing was restricted to trucks only and designated as a truck route.[23] By the end of the year, another realignment straightened out a series of turns from the county line northward to Wolverine in Cheboygan County.[24][25] The following year, US 27 was extended to follow US 23 between Cheboygan and Mackinaw City. That year, the last section of the highway was also paved southwest of Houghton Lake.[26][27] In 1938, the route of US 27 on the north side of downtown Lansing was realigned on an extended Larch Street.[28][29] The US 27A loop into Shepherd was removed the next year.[30][31]

In the latter half of 1940, US 23 was rerouted to follow the Lake Huron shoreline northwest of Alpena; after this change was completed, US 27's concurrency with US 23 was shortened to start in downtown Cheboygan instead of south of town.[32][33] Later in the decade, US 27 was rerouted to run to the west of Houghton and Higgins lakes in 1949.[34][35] The next year, the truck route designation in Lansing was decommissioned when the mainline was rerouted to replace it.[36][37] In the early 1950s, the highway was rerouted to the south of St. Johns, and by early 1952 a business loop was created for the city; this four-lane divided highway extended as far south as the DeWitt area.[38][39] By the end of 1952, a four-lane divided highway segment opened southwest of Lansing to bypass Millett.[39][40]

Conversion to freeways[edit]

US 27 before relocation and conversion to a freeway near Clare

The first planning maps from 1947 for what later became the Interstate Highway System did not include a highway along US 27's route; instead a highway further west connecting South Bend, Indiana, with Kalamazoo was included.[41] This alternative highway was maintained on the 1955 plan for the "National System of Interstate and Defense Highways",[42] and numbered I-67 in August 1957.[43] By June 1958, this freeway had been shifted further east and renumbered I-69, connecting Indianapolis, Indiana, with Marshall; no connections north and east to Lansing were planned as part of the Interstate Highway System.[44]

The Mackinac Bridge was opened to traffic on November 1, 1957; a new section of freeway and an interchange connected US 2 to the bridge.[45] The US 27 designation was initially extended across the bridge from Mackinaw City to St. Ignace.[46] In November 1960, sections of I-75 freeway opened from Indian River north to the southern Mackinac Bridge approaches in Mackinaw City,[47] and US 27 was removed from the bridge.[48]

In 1961, the MSHD had proposed that the section of US 27 south of Lansing be built as an electronic highway under a bid through General Motors;[49] the testing for such a roadway was ultimately done at Ohio State University instead.[50] That September, the section of I-75 between Gaylord and Vanderbilt was completed,[51] and in October 1961, the first segment of I-75 near Grayling opened, connecting M-18 with the city.[52] By the end of the year, the former segment of US 27 between Grayling and Gaylord was turned back to local control, and the section of highway between Indian River and Cheboygan was redesignated M-27. After this individual segment of freeway was completed, there was a gap between Gaylord and Indian River that was designated "TO I-75" on maps along the former segment of US 27, and US 27 was truncated to about five miles (8.0 km) south of Grayling. Also by the end of the same year, the highway was shifted to follow a new freeway routing from the southwest of Ithaca to Grayling, bypassing Ithaca, St. Louis, Mount Pleasant, Clare and Harrison. The old route was turned over to local control except through the aforementioned cities where it was reused for business loops. The US 27A through Alma was also bypassed by the new freeway, and it was redesignated BUS US 27 as well. Another non-freeway bypass was built around Charlotte, and the former route was redesignated BUS US 27.[48][53]

On December 12, 1962, I-96 was completed around the Lansing area,[54] and M-78 was rerouted to follow it. The route of US 27/M-78 through downtown Lansing became US 27/BUS M-78.[55] On October 11, 1967, the first segment of I-69/US 27 was scheduled to open between the Indiana state line and Tekonsha.[56] By the end of the year, the freeway was extended north to Marshall. The former route of US 27 in Coldwater was redesignated as a Business Loop I-69 (BL I-69) as well.[57]

The MSHD requested additional Interstate Highway mileage in 1968 under the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1968 including an extension of I-69 from Marshall to Port Huron;[58] this extension was approved as far as I-75/US 23 in Flint on December 13, 1968.[59] This extension encompassed the US 27 corridor between Marshall and Lansing.[60]

In 1970, the I-69/US 27 freeway was extended from Marshall to just south of Olivet.[61][62] The next year, the freeway was extended north to, and incorporated, the previous Charlotte bypass. BUS US 27 through Charlotte remains unchanged.[62][63] In 1973, the M-78 concurrency from Olivet northeasterly along US 27 was removed, and the connection along US 27 northeast of the existing I-69 freeway was designated TEMP I-69.[64][65] The following year, BUS US 27 in Charlotte was renumbered as a BL I-69.[65][66]

A northern freeway bypass of the Lansing area opened in 1984. MDOT rerouted US 27 to follow I-96 around the west side of the city and over the new freeway to reconnect with the exiting routing north of Lansing. The former US 27 through downtown Lansing was redesignated BUS 27 that that time.[67][68] Another segment of freeway opened in 1987 in Clinton County between US 127 near DeWitt and TEMP I-69 near Bath.[69][70]

In 1991, MDOT and the Indiana Department of Transportation petitioned AASHTO to remove the US 27 designation from its concurrency with I-69 in the two states; this request was denied by the association's Special Committee on U.S. Route Numbering at its October 11, 1991, meeting because it would have resulted in a section of US 27 north of Lansing disconnected from the remainder of the highway south of Fort Wayne, Indiana.[71] The final segment of I-69/US 27 to be completed was located southwest of Lansing. It opened on October 17, 1992, when the ribbon was cut by Governor John Engler. This Interstate Highway segment was the last in the state and completed Michigan's portion of the Interstate Highway System.[72] At the time it was complete, I-69 was concurrent with US 27 from the state line north to the DeWitt area (exit 87) and then concurrent with US 127 to exit 89.[73]

A few years later, the statutory definition of the I-73 corridor was amended in 1995 to have a branch that would encompass the section of US 27 north of Lansing. This new Interstate was to follow US 223 and US 127 between Toledo, Ohio, and Lansing before continuing north to I-75 near Grayling. From Grayling northward, the I-73 corridor was defined to follow I-75 to Sault Ste. Marie.[74][c]

The St. Johns Bypass on US 27 opened on August 31, 1998;[76] US 27 was extended along I-69 about two miles (3.2 km) to connect to the bypass, and US 127 was removed from its short concurrency with I-69. After this opening, US 27 was a full freeway in Michigan from the state line north to St. Johns and from Ithaca to the Grayling area.[77] The last signalized intersection on US 27 in the state was removed in 2000 when the junction with M-57 was converted to an interchange in southern Gratiot County.[78][79]

Decommissioning in Michigan[edit]

I-73 (Future).svg

The previous year, MDOT petitioned AASHTO to decommission the US 27 designation in the state; the change was approved by AASHTO on April 16, 1999.[5] The department considered three options to build the southern segments of I-73 in 2000;[80] MDOT abandoned further study of these southern alignments after June 12, 2001, diverting remaining funding to safety improvement projects along the corridor.[81] The department stated there was a "lack of need" for sections of the proposed freeway, and the project website was closed down in 2002.[82]

The approved removal of US 27 was finally done in the middle of 2002.[83] MDOT's stated reason for the modification was to "reduce confusion along the US 27/US 127 corridor".[84] After US 27's signage was removed, the highway north of the Lansing area was renumbered US 127, and the US 27 designation was removed from I-69.[84] All of the business loops were updated to reflect their new parent highway.[85]

On August 19, 2010, the Michigan House of Representatives passed a resolution recognizing "Old US 27" as a historic road in the state.[86] According to press reports in 2011, a group advocating on behalf of I-73 is working to revive the freeway project in Michigan. According to an MDOT spokesman, "to my knowledge, we’re not taking that issue up again."[87]

Exit list[edit]

At the time the US 27 designation was decommissioned in Michigan, only the interchanges along the section concurrent with I-69 used exit numbers.

County Location Mile[4] km Exit Destinations Notes
Branch Kinderhook Township 0.000 0.000 I-69 south / US 27 south – Fort Wayne Indiana state line
2.617 4.212 3 Copeland Road – Kinderhook
OvidColdwater township line 9.701 15.612 10 BL I‑69 north (Fenn Road) – Coldwater
Coldwater 12.607 20.289 13 BL I‑69 south / US 12 – Quincy, Coldwater
ColdwaterGirard township line 16.024 25.788 16 Jonesville Road
Calhoun Tekonsha Township 22.546 36.284 23 Tekonsha, Girard Exit for Old US 27 which follows Main Street in Tekonsha and Marshall Road in Branch County
24.627 39.633 25 M‑60 – Three Rivers, Jackson
Fredonia Township 31.532 50.746 32 M‑227 (F Drive South)
Marshall 36.207–
36.217
58.270–
58.286
36 BL I‑94 / M‑96 (Michigan Avenue) – Marshall Southern end of BL I-94 concurrency
Marshall Township 38.132–
38.150
61.368–
61.396
38 I‑94 – Detroit, Chicago Northern end of BL I-94 concurrency
Convis Township 41.896 67.425 42 N Drive North
Eaton Walton Township 48.229 77.617 48 M‑78 – Bellevue, Olivet
50.406 81.121 51 Ainger Road – Olivet
CarmelEaton township line 56.676 91.211 57 BL I‑69 north (Cochran Road) – Charlotte
Charlotte 59.549 95.835 60 M‑50 – Charlotte, Eaton Rapids
61.108 98.344 61 BL I‑69 south (Lansing Road) – Charlotte
Potterville 66.388 106.841 66 M‑100 north (Hartel Road) – Potterville, Grand Ledge
Windsor Township 70.270 113.089 70 Lansing Road
Delta Charter Township 72.720–
72.743
117.031–
117.069
72 I‑96 east – Detroit Southern end of I-96 concurrency; concurrency uses I-96 exit numbers; signed as exit 97 southbound
74.877 120.503 95 I‑496 east – Downtown Lansing Western terminus of I-496
76.341 122.859 93 BL I‑69 east / M‑43 (Saginaw Highway) – Grand Ledge Signed as exits 93B (east) and 93A (west)
Clinton Watertown Township 78.653–
80.292
126.580–
129.217
91 I‑96 west – Grand Rapids Northern end of I-96 concurrency; I-69 changes from north–south to east–west; signed on I-69 westbound as exit 81 with access to and eastbound entrance from Frances Road
DeWitt Township 83.081 133.706 84 Airport Road
84.820 136.505 85 DeWitt Exit located at DeWitt Road
86.315 138.911 87 Old US 27
88.227–
88.256
141.988–
142.034
89 I‑69 east – Flint
US 127 south – Lansing, Jackson
Northern end of I-69 concurrency; signed as exits 89A (US 127 south) and 89B (US 27 north)
DeWittOlive township line 91.777 147.701 Round Lake Road – DeWitt
Olive Township 96.787 155.764
BUS US 27 (Price Road) – St. Johns
Bingham Township 101.807 163.842 M‑21 – Ionia, Owosso
105.257 169.395
BUS US 27 (OLD US 27) – St. Johns
Greenbush Township 106.142 170.819 Northern end of freeway; southern end of expressway
Gratiot Washington Township 115.392 185.705 M‑57 (Cleveland Avenue) – Greenville, Chesaning Partial cloverleaf interchange
North Star Township 121.76 195.95 Northern end of expressway; southern end of freeway
Ithaca 123.717 199.103
BUS US 27 (Washington Road) – Ithaca
Signed only as Washington Road southbound
Emerson Township 125.028 201.213
BUS US 27 (Polk Road) – Ithaca
Signed only as Polk Road northbound
EmersonBethany township line 129.053 207.691
BUS US 27 north (Lincoln Road) – Alma
Northbound exit and southbound entrance; southern terminus of business loop through Alma;
BethanyPine River township line 129.373 208.206
BUS US 27 (State Road) – St. Louis
Southern terminus of business loop through St. Louis
Pine River Township 131.543 211.698
BUS US 27 south / M‑46 – St. Louis
Northern terminus of business loop for St. Louis; signed as M-46 only northbound
133.010 214.059
BUS US 27 – Alma
Southbound exit and northbound entrance; northern terminus of business loop for Alma
Isabella Coe Township 141.024 226.956 Wright Avenue/Blanchard Road – Shepherd
Union Charter Township 145.297 233.833
BUS US 27 north – Mt. Pleasant
Northbound exit and southbound entrance
148.713 239.330 M‑20 (Pickard Street) – Big Rapids, Midland
150.150 241.643
BUS US 27 south – Mt. Pleasant
Southbound exit and northbound entrance
Rosebush 155.249 249.849 Rosebush Road – Rosebush
Vernon Township 162.158 260.968
BUS US 27 north to US 10 east – Clare
Northbound entrance and southbound exit; access to eastbound US 10 via BUS US 10
Clare Clare 164.065–
164.312
264.037–
264.435
US 10 east – Midland South end of US 10 concurrency; southbound exit and northbound entrance
165.787 266.808
BUS US 27 south / BUS US 10 east – Clare
Signed as Old 27 only southbound
165.911–
166.589
267.008–
268.099
Michigan Welcome Center
168.369 270.964 US 10 west to M‑115 – Reed City, Cadillac Northern end of US 10 concurrency
Hatton Township 173.830 279.752 Mannsiding Road – Lake George
Hayes Township 176.201 283.568
BUS US 27 / M‑61 – Harrison
Signed as M-61 only southbound
182.162 293.161
BUS US 27 – Harrison
Signed as Old 27 only northbound
Roscommon Roscommon Township 195.939 315.333 Snow Bowl Road
Houghton Lake Heights 200.555 322.762 M‑55 – Lake City, West Branch
Lyon Township 207.596 334.093 West Higgins Lake Road
Crawford Beaver Creek Township 212.276 341.625 Military Road, North Higgins Lake Road
217.719–
218.195
350.385–
351.151
I‑75 north – Mackinac Bridge Exit 249 on I-75; northbound exit to I-75 northbound and southbound entrance from I-75 southbound
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Related trunklines[edit]

Over its history, US 27 had several business loops associated with it. Since the conversion of the highway into a freeway starting in the 1950s, these business loops served Marshall, Charlotte, Lansing, St. Johns, Ithaca, Alma, St. Louis, Mount Pleasant, Clare and Harrison. The business loops north of Lansing were redesignated as business loops of US 127 in 2002 while the Charlotte loop had been reassigned BL I-69 with the completion of I-69 through the area. In addition, Michigan had a US 27A designation through Alma and a Truck US 27 in Lansing.

Truck route[edit]


Truck US Highway 27
Location: Lansing
Length: 1.5 mi[88] (2.4 km)
Existed: c. 1936[23]–1950[36][37]

TRUCK US 27 was a former truck route through the city of Lansing. It started at the corner of Capitol Avenue and Main Street and ran along Main Street to Grand Avenue. There, it turned north on Grand Avenue to Kalamazoo Street and turned east on Kalamazoo over the Grand River. At Larch Street, TRUCK US 27 continued north to rejoin the mainline at the corner of Larch and Saginaw streets.[36]

By the middle of 1936, the US 27/M-78 routing through Lansing was split into two. The mainline was restricted to cars only and moved to run along Capitol Avenue. The former routing was restricted to trucks only and designated as a truck route.[23] In 1950, the bridge for Main Street over the Grand River was completed and mainline US 27/M-78 was rerouted to use it to connect to Larch Street. From there north, US 27/M-78 followed Larch Street supplanting the truck route, which was decommissioned at that time.[36][37]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Michigan State Highway Department was reorganized into the Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation on August 23, 1973.[12] The name was shortened to its current form in 1978.[13]
  2. ^ AASHO was renamed the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) on November 13, 1973.[16]
  3. ^ The original defined alignment of I-73 would have simply run along I-75 to Detroit.[75]

References[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Weingroff, Richard F. (January 9, 2009). "From Names to Numbers: The Origins of the US Numbered Highway System". Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved April 21, 2009. 
  2. ^ Bureau of Public Roads (November 11, 1926). United States System of Highways Adopted for Uniform Marking by the American Association of State Highway Officials (Map). 1:7,000,000. Cartography by U.S. Geological Survey. OCLC 32889555. http://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth298433/m1/1/zoom/. Retrieved November 7, 2013.
  3. ^ Ranzenberger, Mark (April 27, 2008). "US 127 Signs Getting Updated". The Morning Sun (Mount Pleasant, MI). pp. 1, 6. OCLC 22378715. Retrieved August 23, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Michigan Department of Transportation (2009). MDOT Physical Reference Finder Application (Map). Cartography by Michigan Center for Geographic Information. http://www.mcgi.state.mi.us/prfinder/. Retrieved August 4, 2013.
  5. ^ a b Zink, Ray (April 17, 1999). "Report of the Special Committee on Route Numbering to the Standing Committee on Highways" (PDF). American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. Retrieved May 24, 2008. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Michigan Department of Transportation (2002). Official Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 cm:9 km. Cartography by MDOT. Section G10–L11, L11–N10.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Google Inc. "Overview Map of Former US 27 in Michigan". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=I-69+N&daddr=US-127+N&hl=en&sll=44.586922,-84.70401&sspn=0.014732,0.014892&geocode=FVozfQIdrCnv-g%3BFbBRqAIdlXnz-g&t=h&mra=ls&z=8. Retrieved August 24, 2013.
  8. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (January 2011) (PDF). Michigan's Railroad System (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Michigan Center for Shared Solutions & Technology Partnerships. http://www.michigan.gov/documents/MDOT_Official_Rail_130897_7.pdf. Retrieved February 1, 2011.
  9. ^ Morrison, p. 1.
  10. ^ Mason, p. 18.
  11. ^ Michigan Legislature, p. 1868
  12. ^ Kulsea, p. 27.
  13. ^ Kulsea, pp. 30–1.
  14. ^ "Michigan May Do Well Following Wisconsin's Road Marking System". The Grand Rapids Press. September 20, 1919. p. 10. OCLC 9975013. 
  15. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1919). State of Michigan: Lower Peninsula (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD.
  16. ^ Staff (December 4, 2012). "November 13". Highway History. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved August 18, 2013. 
  17. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (December 1, 1926). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD.
  18. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (December 1, 1927). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD.
  19. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (May 1, 1929). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD.
  20. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (January 1, 1930). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by H.M. Gousha.
  21. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1930). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by H.M. Gousha.
  22. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (November 1, 1930). Official Highway Service Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by H.M. Gousha.
  23. ^ a b c Michigan State Highway Department (June 1, 1936). 1936 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Rand McNally. Lansing inset.
  24. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (June 1,). 1936 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given 1936. Cartography by Rand McNally. Section F10.
  25. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (December 15, 1936). 1936/7 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Rand McNally (Winter ed.). Section F10.
  26. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (May 15, 1937). 1937 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Rand McNally (Summer ed.). Section E10, H10.
  27. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (December 1, 1937). 1937/8 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Rand McNally (Winter ed.). Section E10, H10.
  28. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (May 1, 1938). 1938 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Rand McNally (Spring ed.). Lansing inset.
  29. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (December 1, 1938). 1938 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Rand McNally (Winter ed.). Lansing inset.
  30. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (April 15, 1939). 1939 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Rand McNally (Summer ed.). Section J10.
  31. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (December 1, 1939). 1939 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Rand McNally (Winter ed.). Section J10.
  32. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (July 15, 1940). 1940 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Rand McNally (Summer ed.). Section E10–F13.
  33. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (December 1, 1940). 1940 Official Michigan Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by Rand McNally (Winter ed.). Section E10–F13.
  34. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (April 1, 1949). Michigan Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD. Section H10.
  35. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1949). Michigan Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD. Section H10.
  36. ^ a b c d Michigan State Highway Department (April 15, 1950). Michigan Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD. Lansing inset.
  37. ^ a b c Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1950). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD. Lansing inset.
  38. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (July 1, 1951). 1951 Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD. Section K11.
  39. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (April 15, 1952). 1952 Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD. Section K11, L11.
  40. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (October 1, 1952). 1952 Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Section L11.
  41. ^ Public Roads Administration (August 2, 1947). National System of Interstate Highways (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by PRA. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Interstate_Highway_plan_August_2,_1947_big_text.jpg. Retrieved September 4, 2010.
  42. ^ Public Roads Administration (September 1955). "National System of Interstate and Defense Highways". General Location of National System of Interstate Highways Including All Additional Routes at Urban Areas Designated in September 1955 (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by PRA. OCLC 416597. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Interstate_Highway_plan_September_1955.jpg.
  43. ^ Public Roads Administration (August 2, 1947). National System of Interstate Highways (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by PRA. http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/infrastructure/fairbank17.cfm. Retrieved May 10, 2008.
  44. ^ American Association of State Highway Officials (June 27, 1958). Official Route Numbering for the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by AASHO. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Interstate_Highway_plan_June_27,_1958.jpg. Retrieved May 10, 2008.
  45. ^ Kulsea, p. 22.
  46. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1958). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD. (Includes all changes through July 1, 1958)
  47. ^ "Michigan To Open 35 More Miles of Freeway". The Blade (Toledo, OH). Associated Press. November 8, 1960. p. 19. OCLC 12962717. Retrieved March 22, 2013. 
  48. ^ a b Michigan State Highway Department (1961). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD. Section F10–K10. (Includes all changes through July 1, 1961)
  49. ^ "Electronic Wonder: State Seeks Highway". The Michigan Daily (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor). July 13, 1961. p. 3. ISSN 0745-967X. Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
  50. ^ "Driverless Auto Being Developed: Could Be Ready in 15 Years, Ohio Researcher Says". The New York Times. December 11, 1966. p. 132. ISSN 0362-4331. 
  51. ^ "Bypasses Gaylord". The Herald-Press (St. Joseph, MI). Associated Press. September 1, 1962. p. 2. OCLC 10117184. Retrieved March 23, 2013. 
  52. ^ "75 Opened". Ludington Daily News. Associated Press. October 9, 1961. p. 8. OCLC 27033604. Retrieved March 23, 2013. 
  53. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1962). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD. Section F10–K10.
  54. ^ "Michigan Freeway Hits 1,000th Mile". The Milwaukee Sentinel. December 13, 1962. Part 1, p. 12. ISSN 1052-4479. 
  55. ^ Michigan State Highway Department (1963). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MSHD. Lansing inset.
  56. ^ "Indiana, Mich., To Open Road". The News-Palladium (Benton Harbor, MI). Associated Press. September 29, 1967. p. 12. OCLC 10117334. Retrieved August 15, 2013. 
  57. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1968). Official Highway Map (Map). Scale not given. Cartography by MDSH. Section M10.
  58. ^ "Highway Additions Requested By State". The Owosso Argus-Press. Associated Press. November 14, 1968. p. 7. OCLC 9802802. Retrieved December 5, 2010. 
  59. ^ Weingroff, Richard (July 16, 2013) [1998]. "Part I: History". The Dwight D. Eisenhower System of Interstate and Defense Highways. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved August 18, 2013. 
  60. ^ "From Toledo to Sault Ste. Marie Without a Stoplight". The Blade (Toledo, OH). Associated Press. February 15, 1970. p. H3. Retrieved November 10, 2013. 
  61. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1970). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi. Cartography by MDSH. Section M10.
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  63. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1972). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi. Cartography by MDSH. Section M10.
  64. ^ Michigan Department of State Highways (1973). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi. Cartography by MDSH. Section M10.
  65. ^ a b Michigan Department of State Highways and Transportation (1974). Official Highway Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi. Cartography by MDSHT. Section M10.
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  67. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1984). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 in:23 km. Cartography by MDOT. Section L11.
  68. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1985). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 in:23 km. Cartography by MDOT. Section L11.
  69. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1987). Official Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 in:23 km. Cartography by MDOT. Section L11.
  70. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1988). Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 in:23 km. Cartography by MDOT. Section L11.
  71. ^ Tabb, John (October 11, 1991). "Report to the Executive Committee" (PDF). Special Committee on U.S. Route Numbering, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
  72. ^ "I-69 Now Open South of Lansing". Marshall Evening Chronicle. Associated Press. p. 20. OCLC 18110507. Retrieved August 17, 2013. 
  73. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1993). Michigan Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 in:23 km. Cartography by MDOT. Section N10–L14.
  74. ^ "The National Highway System Designation Act of 1995". United States Congress. November 28, 1995. Pub.L. 104–59. Retrieved September 28, 2010. "§1105(c)(5) I-73/74 North-South Corridor from Charleston, South Carolina, through Winston-Salem, North Carolina, to Portsmouth, Ohio, to Cincinnati, Ohio, to termini at Detroit, Michigan and Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The Sault Ste. Marie terminus shall be reached via a corridor connecting Adrian, Jackson, Lansing, Mount Pleasant, and Grayling, Michigan." 
  75. ^ "Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991". United States Congress. December 18, 1991. Pub.L. 102–240. Retrieved September 28, 2010. "§1105(c)(5) I-73/74 North-South Corridor from Charleston, South Carolina, through Winston-Salem, North Carolina, to Portsmouth, Ohio, to Cincinnati, Ohio, and Detroit, Michigan." 
  76. ^ Truscott, John (August 31, 1998). "Governor Engler Opens US 27 Freeway" (Press release). Michigan Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on June 2, 2008. Retrieved May 24, 2008. 
  77. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (1999). Michigan Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 cm:9 km. Cartography by MDOT. Section G10–N10.
  78. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2001). Official Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 cm:9 km. Cartography by MDOT. Section K11.
  79. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2001). Official Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 cm:9 km. Cartography by MDOT. Section K11.
  80. ^ "Michigan Settles on 3 Options for I-73: State Still May Decide not to Build Highway". The Blade (Toledo, OH). December 14, 2000. p. B2. OCLC 12962717. Retrieved December 19, 2010. 
  81. ^ Stiles, Linda (June 13, 2001). "Funds for I-73 Instead Will Be Used to Repair Routes 127, 223". Jackson Citizen Patriot. p. A1. OCLC 9939307. 
  82. ^ Hickey, JoAnne (August 22, 2007). "South Takes the Lead: I-73 Will Push from South to North" (PDF). Marion Star & Mullins Enterprise (Marion, SC). p. 5A. OCLC 761993706. Archived from the original on May 8, 2012. Retrieved January 4, 2011. 
  83. ^ Ranzenberger, Mark (April 27, 2008). "US 127 Signs Getting Updated". The Morning Sun (Mount Pleasant, MI). pp. 1A, 6A. OCLC 22378715. Retrieved August 23, 2012. 
  84. ^ a b Debnar, Kari & Bott, Mark (January 14, 2002). "US 27 Designation Soon To Be Deleted from Michigan Highways" (PDF) (Press release). Michigan Department of Transportation. 
  85. ^ Michigan Department of Transportation (2003). Official Department of Transportation Map (Map). 1 in:14.5 mi / 1 cm:9 km. Cartography by MDOT (2003–04 ed.).
  86. ^ Michigan House of Representatives (2010). "House Resolution 0319 (2010)]". Michigan Legislature. Retrieved May 8, 2012. 
  87. ^ Pelham, Dennis (July 16, 2011). "Group Seeks to Revive I-73 Interest in Michigan". The Daily Telegram (Adrian, MI). p. A8. OCLC 33972687. Archived from the original on May 8, 2012. Retrieved September 6, 2011. 
  88. ^ Google Inc. "Overview Map of Former Truck US 27". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=W+Main+St&daddr=42.727564,-84.5507296+to:42.73188,-84.54469+to:E+Saginaw+St&hl=en&sll=42.730055,-84.548163&sspn=0.030389,0.029097&geocode=FWfwiwIdRs_1-g%3BFYz4iwIdt9v1-in7FV-x28EiiDEKMk8X6gpulQ%3BFWgJjAIdTvP1-ikjo3xJ3sEiiDGmWzam5ur5xg%3BFSwsjAIddvP1-g&vpsrc=0&mra=dpe&mrsp=2&sz=15&via=1,2&t=m&z=15. Retrieved September 7, 2011.

Works cited[edit]

  • Barnett, LeRoy (2004). A Drive Down Memory Lane: The Named State and Federal Highways of Michigan. Allegan Forest, MI: The Priscilla Press. ISBN 1-886167-24-9. 
  • Hyde, Charles K. (1993). Historic Highway Bridges of Michigan. Detroit: Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-2448-7. 
  • Kulsea, Bill & Shawver, Tom (1980). Making Michigan Move: A History of Michigan Highways and the Michigan Department of Transportation. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Transportation. OCLC 8169232. 
  • Mason, Philip P. (1959). Michigan Highways From Indian Trails to Expressways. Ann Arbor, MI: Braun-Brumfield. OCLC 23314983. 
  • Michigan Legislature (1915) [1913]. "Chapter 91: State Reward Trunk Line Highways". In Shields, Edmund C.; Black, Cyrenius P. & Broomfield, Archibald. The Compiled Laws of the State of Michigan, Volume I. Lansing, MI: Wynkoop, Hallenbeck, Crawford. pp. 1868–72. OCLC 44724558. Retrieved January 24, 2012. 
  • Morrison, Roger L. (Autumn 1937). "The History and Development of Michigan Highways". Michigan Alumnus Quarterly Review (Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Bureau of Alumni Relations) 39 (54): 59–73. OCLC 698029175. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing


US Highway 27
Previous state:
Indiana
Michigan Next state:
Terminus