Chance Rides

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Chance Rides Manufacturing
Private
Industry Amusement ride manufacturing
Founded Chance Manufacturing: 1961
Chance Rides Manufacturing: 2002
Headquarters Wichita, Kansas, United States[1]
Key people
Harold Chance, Richard (Dick) Chance, Michael Chance
Products Roller coasters, thrill rides, family rides, gentle rides
Subsidiaries Chance Morgan
Website chancerides.com

Chance Rides Manufacturing is a roller coaster and amusement ride manufacturer. The company was formed on May 16, 2002, when the former Chance Industries Inc. emerged from bankruptcy. The main office and manufacturing facility are located in Wichita, Kansas.

History[edit]

Chance Manufacturing was incorporated in 1961 by Richard H. (Harold) Chance. Harold Chance had been involved in the amusement business since 1946 building small trains for the Ottaway Amusement Company. He designed a 24-inch gauge replica of the C. P. Huntington, a well-known steam locomotive built in 1863.[2] Titled by the same name, Chance's C. P. Huntington is the company's most successful product line.[1] In 1967, Chance began producing Starliner Trams under the subsidiary Chance Coach. In 1970, Chance acquired the assets of the Allan Herschell Company. Richard G. Chance (Dick Chance) assumed control of the company and formed Chance Industries, Inc. in 1985 to oversee the various divisions – Chance Rides, Chance Coach, and Chance Operations.[1] In December 1986, Chance then acquired Bradley & Kaye, a ride manufacturer specialized in children's rides and carousel figures.[3]

Modern era[edit]

For several years, Chance Rides Manufacturing products were sold under the brand Chance Morgan. In 2011, the company reintroduced the Chance Rides brand which encompasses Chance Morgan Coasters, Inc. and Chance Rides Manufacturing.[1] On September 17, 2011, trade publication Amusement Today presented Chance Rides with the Golden Ticket Award for Supplier of the Year, in honor of the company's 50th anniversary.[4]

Carousels[edit]

Chance Carrousels (deliberately spelled with two 'Rs') were introduced in 1971 following the acquisition of the Allan Herschell Company the previous year. Chance modified the Herschell design giving it a more ornate style.[1] After Chance purchased Bradley & Kaye in December 1986, Chance was able to use the molds and manufacturing rights to 62 carousel figures produced by Bradley & Kaye owner, David Bradley. He had carefully reproduced prized carousel animals from famous carvers over the previous 20 years and new molds were cast at the Chance facility under his direction, until Bradley died in 1988.[5] These famous reproductions with spectacular detail have been included on Chance carrousels since the late 1980s. With the merger of the D. H. Morgan line of carousels, some of the unique Morgan figures have been added to the collection as well. Although fiberglass, the magnificent detail and menagerie of different styles of horses and other figures have become a trademark of Chance Rides carrousels.[1]

Ferris wheels[edit]

Chance American Wheels logo.jpg

The first Ferris wheel from Chance, the Astro Wheel, was sold to showman Don Franklin and debuted at the 1967 Iowa State Fair. It featured 16 cars with two passengers per car.[6] The first park model, an 80-foot Giant Wheel, was built in 1975 at Valleyfair amusement park in Minnesota.[7] It features 18 cars holding four passengers per car and is still in operation. The Giant Wheel/Century Wheel was introduced in various sizes in both park and portable models in 1988.[8]

In 2006, Chance worked with Ronald Bussink Professional Rides of Switzerland and Dutch Wheels BV, a division of Vekoma Rides, to produce larger wheels such as the Niagara SkyWheel which stands 53.3 m (175 ft) tall.[9] It features 42 air-conditioned cars seating eight passengers per car.[10] According to Chance Rides director Angus Jenkins, the larger wheels are known as observation wheels as opposed to Ferris wheels, since they carry riders in enclosed cars rather than in open seats.[11]

On October 19, 2012, Chance Rides announced a long term license agreement with Bussink Design GmbH for the exclusive rights to manufacture and sell the R80XL Giant Wheel in North America.[12] Chance Rides will market the R80XL, which is over 250 ft (76 m) tall, under an affiliate company, Chance American Wheels. The first R80XL wheel was manufactured by Maurer German Wheels in Munich, Germany, and will be delivered early in 2013; three more R80XL wheels are currently under construction by Maurer.[13] The first U.S. version, built by Chance, is expected to be ready for delivery by the beginning of 2014.[14] Chance Rides/Chance American Wheels will continue to manufacturer and sell R60 wheels in North America under an exclusive license from Dutch Wheels BV.[9]

Notable wheels include:

Roller coasters[edit]

Chance Manufacturing's first coaster was the Toboggan, a portable ride in which a small vehicle climbed vertically up a tower then spiraled back down around the same tower. The ride was invented by Walter House of Amarillo, Texas, and Chance acquired the manufacturing rights and started producing it in 1969. It was designed to be a carnival ride, fitting on two trailers, but several units were purchased by amusement parks where they were set up as permanent attractions. Chance manufactured 32 of these units, two of which still operate at a permanent park.[23] In 1998 Chance introduced the Big Dipper children's coaster. With the integration of the D. H. Morgan line into Chance Rides in 2001, the company acquired track manufacturing technology and the ability to offer a variety of coaster designs. D. H. Morgan was an offshoot of Arrow Development, original developer of tubular steel track, first used on Disney's Matterhorn Bobsleds attraction. In 2006, Chance formed an alliance with Vekoma.[24] Chance Rides represented Vekoma in North America and manufactured the steel track for select projects. On October 17, 2012 Chance Rides and Vekoma discontinued their agreement to produce rides together for the North American market.[25]

List of roller coasters[edit]

As of 2017, Chance Rides has built 34 roller coasters around the world.[26]

Name Model Park Country Opened Status Ref
Toboggan Toboggan Trimper's Rides United States United States Unknown Removed [27]
Toboggan Toboggan Adventureland United States United States Unknown Removed [28]
Toboggan Toboggan Jenkinson's Boardwalk United States United States Unknown Removed [29]
Toboggan Toboggan Great Adventure Amusement Park United States United States Unknown Removed [30]
Star Wars Toboggan Parc Avenue France France Unknown Removed [31]
Toboggan Toboggan Playland Park United States United States Unknown Removed [32]
Toboggan Toboggan Old Chicago United States United States Unknown Removed [33]
Swiss Toboggan Toboggan Boblo Island Canada Canada Unknown Removed [34]
Toboggan Toboggan Shaheen's Fun-O-Rama Park United States United States Unknown Removed [35]
Toboggan Toboggan Central Pier Arcade & Speedway United States United States Unknown Removed [36]
Toboggan Toboggan Funtown Pier United States United States Unknown Removed [37]
Toboggan Toboggan Family Kingdom Amusement Park United States United States Unknown Removed [38]
Toboggan Toboggan Sportland Pier United States United States 1966 Removed [39]
Swamp Buggy Toboggan Six Flags AstroWorld United States United States 1970 Removed [40]
Toboggan Toboggan Parc Belmont Canada Canada 1970 Removed [41]
Toboggan Toboggan Casino Pier United States United States 1970 Removed [42]
Toboggan Toboggan Lakemont Park United States United States 1971 Closed [43]
Swiss Toboggan Toboggan Santa's Village AZoosment Park United States United States 1971 Removed [44]
Toboggan Toboggan Hersheypark United States United States 1972 Removed [45] & [46]
Arctic Cat Toboggan Crystal Beach Canada Canada 1974 Removed [47]
Unknown Toboggan Cal Expo Amusement Park United States United States 1975 Removed [48]
Toboggan Toboggan Stewart Beach Park United States United States 1980 Removed [49]
Wild & Wooly Toboggan
Formerly Toboggan
Formerly Earthquake McGoon's Brain Rattler
Toboggan Little Amerricka
Seven Peaks Water Park Duneland
Dogpatch USA
United States United States 1993
1989 to 1990
1969 to 1988
Operating [50]
[51]
[52]
Toboggan Toboggan Grand Prix Amusements
Arnolds Park
Canada Canada 1999
1998
Removed [53]
[54]
Toboggan Toboggan Conneaut Lake Park United States United States 2002 In storage [55]
Toboggan Toboggan Clacton Pier
Great Yarmouth Pleasure Beach
United Kingdom United Kingdom 2009
1993 to 2000
Removed [56]
[57]
Joust Big Dipper Dutch Wonderland United States United States 1998 Operating [58]
Big Dipper Big Dipper Michigan's Adventure United States United States 1999 Operating [59]
Gold Rush Big Dipper Wild Adventures United States United States 1999 Removed [60]
Wile E. Coyote's Grand Canyon Blaster Big Dipper Six Flags Over Texas United States United States 2001 Operating [61]
The Joker Funhouse Coaster
Formerly Wile E. Coyote Canyon Blaster
Big Dipper Custom Six Flags Over Georgia United States United States 2004 Operating [62]
Lightning Run Hyper GT-X Coaster Kentucky Kingdom United States United States 2014 Operating [63]
Family Roller Coaster Big Dipper Custom Wildlife World United States United States 2016 Operating [64]

Current models[edit]

Past models[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Seifert, Jeffrey (November 2011), "Chance Rides celebrates 50 years of fun and thrills", Amusement Today, 15 (8.2): 28–30 
  2. ^ "Southern Pacific Railroad Steam Locomotive No. 1". California Department of Parks and Recreation. Retrieved June 2, 2014. 
  3. ^ "About the Author". Maker of Dreams. Archived from the original on February 13, 2015. Retrieved August 23, 2016. In December 1986, when Chance Rides, Inc. acquired Bradley & Kaye, a Long Beach, California based ride manufacturer specializing in children’s rides and carrousel animals, Swinson saw a new opportunity for Chance Rides in the shopping center industry, which he was already familiar with because of his commercial real estate background. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Seifert, Jeffrey (September 2011), "For 50 years, Chance Rides delivers rides, fun to the amusement industry", Amusement Today, 15 (6.2): 32 
  5. ^ Meares, Hadley (November 1, 2013). "Beverly Park and Ponyland: The 'Kiddieland' that Inspired Walt Disney". KCET. Retrieved February 5, 2015. 
  6. ^ Chance, Harold (2004). The Book of Chance. Wichita, Kansas: Wichita Press. p. 44. ISBN 0-9649065-0-3. 
  7. ^ Chance, Harold (2004). The Book of Chance. Wichita, Kansas: Wichita Press. p. 56. ISBN 0-9649065-0-3. 
  8. ^ "Ferris Wheel Comes Full Circle". New York Times. May 20, 2001. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b "Dutch Wheels expands its activities into the North American market". Amusement Today. October 31, 2012. Retrieved November 4, 2012. 
  10. ^ One of a Kind ‘Giant Wheel’ Debuts in Niagara Falls, Canada
  11. ^ Voorhis, Dan (January 16, 2014). "Chance Rides of Wichita building 175-foot-tall observation wheel for resort outside D.C". The Witchita Eagle. Retrieved June 2, 2014. 
  12. ^ R80XL Giant Wheel
  13. ^ "Chance Rides signs exclusive deal with Bussink Design". Amusement Today. October 20, 2012. Retrieved October 21, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Bussink Design sets new World Record with R80 XL!". Bussink Design. Retrieved 15 January 2013. 
  15. ^ Rice, Bill (June 10, 1989). "Much to do in Lake George". Schenedtady Gazette. Retrieved October 22, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Cleveland I-X Center". About.com. April 10, 2012. Retrieved October 21, 2012. 
  17. ^ "I-X Center Facility Overview". I-X Center. 1999. Archived from the original on November 1, 2012. Retrieved October 21, 2012. 
  18. ^ "Chance Giant Wheel Draws Guests to new addition at Hersheypark" (Press release). Chance Rides. July 18, 1996. 
  19. ^ "Chance Giant Wheel and other Chance products help Clementon Amusement Park cash in on family appeal" (Press release). Chance Rides. August 6, 1997. 
  20. ^ Breathtaking views of Niagara Falls Aboard the First Chance Morgan R60 Giant Wheel
  21. ^ New R60 Giant Wheel Coming to Myrtle Beach, SC
  22. ^ "Chance Rides Blog". Chance Rides. August 8, 2012. Retrieved October 21, 2012. 
  23. ^ Chance, Harold (2004). The Book of Chance. Wichita, Kansas: Wichita Press. p. 48. ISBN 0-9649065-0-3. 
  24. ^ "Vekoma Rides Manufacturing BV - Sales & Marketing". Retrieved 25 February 2012. 
  25. ^ a b "Chance Rides & Vekoma Rides decide to discontinue North America coop". Amusement Today. October 17, 2012. Retrieved October 18, 2012. 
  26. ^ Chance Rides - rcdb.com
  27. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Trimper's Rides)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  28. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Adventureland)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  29. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Jenkinson's Boardwalk)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  30. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Great Adventure Amusement Park)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  31. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Parc Avenue)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  32. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Playland Park)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  33. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Old Chicago)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  34. ^ Marden, Duane. "Swiss Toboggan  (Boblo Island)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  35. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Shaheen's Fun-O-Rama Park)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  36. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Central Pier Arcade & Speedway)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  37. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Funtown Pier)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  38. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Family Kingdom Amusement Park)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  39. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Sportland Pier)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  40. ^ Marden, Duane. "Swamp Buggy  (Six Flags AstroWorld)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  41. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Parc Belmont)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  42. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Casino Pier)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  43. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Lakemont Park)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  44. ^ Marden, Duane. "Swiss Toboggan  (Santa's Village AZoosment Park)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  45. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Hersheypark)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  46. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Hersheypark)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  47. ^ Marden, Duane. "Arctic Cat  (Crystal Beach)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  48. ^ Marden, Duane. "Unknown  (Cal Expo Amusement Park)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  49. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Stewart Beach Park)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  50. ^ Marden, Duane. "Wild & Wooly Toboggan  (Little Amerricka)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  51. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Seven Peaks Water Park Duneland)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  52. ^ Marden, Duane. "Earthquake McGoon's Brain Rattler  (Dogpatch USA)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  53. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Grand Prix Amusements)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  54. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Arnolds Park)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  55. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Conneaut Lake Park)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  56. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Clacton Pier)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  57. ^ Marden, Duane. "Toboggan  (Great Yarmouth Pleasure Beach)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  58. ^ Marden, Duane. "Joust  (Dutch Wonderland)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  59. ^ Marden, Duane. "Big Dipper  (Michigan's Adventure)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  60. ^ Marden, Duane. "Gold Rush  (Wild Adventures)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  61. ^ Marden, Duane. "Wile E. Coyote's Grand Canyon Blaster  (Six Flags Over Texas)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  62. ^ Marden, Duane. "Joker Funhouse Coaster  (Six Flags Over Georgia)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  63. ^ Marden, Duane. "Lightning Run  (Kentucky Kingdom)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  64. ^ Marden, Duane. "Family Roller Coaster  (Wildlife World)". Roller Coaster DataBase. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  65. ^ a b c d "Chance Rides Carrousels". Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved 1 July 2013. 
  66. ^ "Aviator". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved 8 July 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  67. ^ C.P. Huntington Train Specs
  68. ^ "Century Wheel". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved 8 July 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  69. ^ "Electric Cars". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved 8 July 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  70. ^ "Family Coasters — Big Dipper". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved 8 July 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  71. ^ "Freestyle". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved 8 July 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  72. ^ "Giant Wheel". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved 8 July 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  73. ^ "Hypercoaster" (PDF). http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved 1 July 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  74. ^ "Hyper GT-X Coaster". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  75. ^ Rutherford, Scott (November 2011), "Chance SkyWheel lights up Myrtle Beach tourism business", Amusement Today, 15 (8.2): 30 
  76. ^ "Chance Rides Wheels". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  77. ^ a b "Chance Rides Revolution". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved 8 July 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  78. ^ "Unicoaster". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved 8 July 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  79. ^ "Wipout". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Retrieved 8 July 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  80. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Chance, Harold (2004). The Book of Chance. Wichita, Kansas: Wichita Press. pp. 35–67. ISBN 0-9649065-0-3. 
  81. ^ Burton, David. "Chaos". Amusement Ride Extravaganza. Retrieved October 21, 2013. 
  82. ^ Burton, David. "Inverter". Amusement Ride Extravaganza. Retrieved October 21, 2013. 
  83. ^ "Rides & Attraction — Music Fest". Helm & Sons Amusements. Retrieved October 21, 2013. 
  84. ^ "Observation Tower". http://chancerides.com. Chance Rides, Inc. 2013. Archived from the original on 19 July 2013. Retrieved 8 July 2013.  External link in |website= (help)
  85. ^ "Chance Rides service bulletin" (PDF). Leisure Technical Consultants Limited. Retrieved October 21, 2013. 
  86. ^ Hollis, Tim. Images of America: Six Flags Over Georgia. Charelston, S.C.: Arcadia Publishing. p. 101. ISBN 0-7385-4358-6. 

External links[edit]