ILGA-Europe

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ILGA-Europe
Formation 1996
Purpose LGBT rights and intersex rights
Headquarters Brussels, Belgium
Region served
47 countries in the Council of Europe; Belarus and Kosovo
Membership
407 member organisations[1]
Main organ
ILGA
Website www.ilga-europe.org

ILGA-Europe is the European region of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association. It is an advocacy group promoting the interests of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons, at the European level. Its membership comprises 407 organisations from throughout Europe. The Association enjoys consultative status at Economic and Social Council of the United Nations (ECOSOC) [2] and participatory status at the Council of Europe.[3]

History[edit]

ILGA-Europe was founded in 1996, when its parent organisation, the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association, established separate regions.[1] It took over responsibility for supporting the development of the LGBT movement in Europe including Transgender Europe, Inter-LGBT, and for relationships with the European Union, Council of Europe and the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe.[1]

Initially ILGA-Europe worked entirely on the basis of volunteer resources. However, in 2001, its potential contribution to the European Union's anti-discrimination policies (established under Article 13 of the Treaty of Amsterdam) was recognised through the provision of core funding, currently through the PROGRESS Programme.[4] This enabled ILGA-Europe to set up an office in Brussels, to recruit permanent staff, and to conduct an extensive programme of work in relation to sexual orientation discrimination within the EU Member States and the accession countries.[4] Financial support from the Sigrid Rausing Trust, the Open Society Institute, Freedom House, the US State Department and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Netherlands allows ILGA-Europe to extend its work in areas not covered by EU funding, including Eastern Europe, and on transgender issues.[4]

ILGA-Europe has hosted its annual conference at the end of October, since 2000, where member organisations elect the Executive Board and decide on the next year's working priorities.[5]

  • 2000 – Bucharest, Romania, theme Accepting Diversity
  • 2001 – Rotterdam, Netherlands, theme Creating Partnership
  • 2002 – Lisbon, Portugal, theme Recognising Diversity, Promoting Equality
  • 2003 – Glasgow, United Kingdom, theme Policy into Practice – making LGBT equality happen
  • 2004 – Budapest, Hungary, theme Coming out to the EU
  • 2005 – Paris, France
  • 2006 – Sofia, Bulgaria, theme We are Family – Our families in Europe and the European family
  • 2007 – Vilnius, Lithuania, theme LGBT Rights are Human Rights – Respect, Recognition and Responsibilities
  • 2008 – Vienna, Austria, theme Think globally, act locally
  • 2009 – Malta, theme Overcoming Religious & Cultural Barriers to LGBT Equality
  • 2010 – The Hague, Netherlands, theme Expressing our differences, challenging our prejudices, developing our alliances
  • 2011 – Turin, Italy, theme Human Rights and "Traditional Values": clash or dialogue?
  • 2012 – Dublin, Ireland, theme Advancing LGBTI equality in challenging economic times
  • 2013 – Zagreb, Croatia, theme Family matters! Reaching out to hearts and minds
  • 2014 – Rīga, Latvia, theme MOVEment: Leading Sustainable Change
  • 2015 – Athens, Greece, theme Many voices, One movement - Together, mobilised for a just society

Current work[edit]

ILGA-Europe works to promote equality and non-discrimination for LGBTI people in asylum, education, employment, family law, freedom of assembly, hate crime, hate speech and health; and works worldwide to protect human rights defenders, trans people and intersex people.[6] The Association provides funding and training for its 407 member organisations, "to maximise efficiency and the use of resources by LGBTI organisations in working towards achievement of their goals; to maximise the impact of advocacy work at the European level; to ensure sustainability of the LGBTI movement in Europe."[6]

ILGA-Europe works with EU Institutions, the Council of Europe and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe to promote equality by lobbying and advocacy, including supporting the adoption of the proposed EU Anti-Discrimination Directive, that would ban discrimination on the grounds of age, disability, religion or belief and sexual orientation in all areas of EU competence.[6] It also uses strategic litigation at the European Court of Human Rights and the European Court of Justice to end discrimination, by identifying gaps in protections, encouraging organisations and individuals to develop court cases, and support such cases with legal resources and amicus curiae briefs.[6]

For the 2014 European Parliament election, ILGA-Europe promoted its Come Out 2014 European Election Pledge to candidate MEPs, which focused on priority LGBTI issues for the 2014–2019 Parliament: an EU roadmap on LGBTI equality; EU human rights enforcement; completing the EU Anti-Discrimination directive; combating homophobic and transphobic violence; an inclusive definition of 'family'; trans rights and depatholigisation; action against school bullying; health discrimination and inequalities; LGBTI asylum seekers; and making the EU champion LGBTI rights worldwide.[6] 187 elected MEPs (25 percent) signed the pledge, including 83 members of the PES, 14 ALDE members and 14 from the EPP.[6]

Rainbow Europe[edit]

Each May, ILGA-Europe releases its Rainbow Europe review, to mark the International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia. It reviews the human rights situation and assesses what life is like for LGBTI people in every European country, covering discrimination, family recognition, hate speech/crimes, gender recognition, freedom of assembly, association and express, and asylum laws.[7] Since 2012, the United Kingdom has come top of the rankings; in 2014 it was rated to have 82-percent progress toward respect of human rights and full equality, just ahead of Belgium, Spain and the Netherlands.[8] Russia was ranked as the worst for LGBTI equality, scoring six percent; closely followed by Armenia, Azerbaijan and Monaco.[9] The 2014 Rainbow Europe reviews are given in the table below.[7][10]

Country Laws & policies against discrimination Family recognition Protection against hate speech/crime Legal gender recognition Respect of freedom of assembly, association & expression Asylum Overall score Change since 2013
Albania 70 % 0 % 72 % 0 % 65 % 0 % 38 % 0%
Andorra 10 % 18 % 18 % 0 % 100 % 0 % 21 % 0%
Armenia 0 % 8 % 0 % 0 % 65 % 0 % 9 % +1%
Austria 41 % 60 % 18 % 80 % 100 % 25 % 52 % +9%
Azerbaijan 0 % 4 % 0 % 14 % 35 % 0 % 7 % −1 %
Belarus 0 % 8 % 0 % 54 % 35 % 0 % 14 % 0%
Belgium 72 % 88 % 90 % 34 % 100 % 100 % 78 % +11%
Bosnia and Herzegovina 40 % 0 % 12 % 7 % 65 % 0 % 20 % 0%
Bulgaria 31 % 8 % 0 % 60 % 100 % 25 % 30 % +12%
Croatia 72 % 10 % 90 % 67 % 65 % 25 % 56 % +8%
Cyprus 13 % 8 % 0 % 21 % 100 % 25 % 20 % 0%
Czech Republic 46 % 40 % 0 % 21 % 100 % 0 % 35 % 0%
Denmark 26 % 100 % 54 % 34 % 100 % 50 % 60 % +3%
Estonia 36 % 8 % 18 % 67 % 100 % 0 % 35 % +9%
European Union 25.5 % 24 % 0 % 30 % 100 % 100 % 32 % N/A
Finland 23 % 64 % 36 % 34 % 100 % 25 % 45 % −2 %
France 60 % 76 % 90 % 14 % 100 % 0 % 64 % 0%
Macedonia 5 % 4 % 0 % 7 % 100 % 0 % 13 % 0%
Georgia 21 % 8 % 36 % 34 % 65 % 0 % 26 % +5%
Germany 65 % 56 % 5 % 80 % 100 % 25 % 56 % +2%
Greece 23 % 8 % 45 % 21 % 100 % 25 % 31 % +3%
Hungary 46 % 44 % 72 % 60 % 65 % 25 % 54 % −1 %
Iceland 20 % 88 % 72 % 67 % 100 % 50 % 64 % +8%
Ireland 23 % 48 % 18 % 7 % 100 % 25 % 34 % −2 %
Italy 37 % 7 % 0 % 21 % 100 % 25 % 25 % +6%
Kosovo 28 % 0 % 18 % 0 % 65 % 0 % 17 % +3%
Latvia 13 % 8 % 0 % 21 % 100 % 25 % 20 % 0%
Liechtenstein 0 % 36 % 0 % 0 % 65 % 50 % 18 % +2%
Lithuania 23 % 4 % 36 % 0 % 65 % 25 % 22 % +1%
Luxembourg 26 % 22 % 0 % 34 % 100 % 25 % 28 % 0%
Malta 36 % 76 % 72 % 21 % 100 % 25 % 57 % +22%
Moldova 5 % 8 % 0 % 60 % 30 % 25 % 17 % +7%
Monaco 0 % 0 % 18 % 0 % 65 % 0 % 10 % +0%
Montenegro 46 % 8 % 0 % 21 % 100 % 0 % 27 % +20%
Netherlands 55 % 100 % 27 % 80 % 100 % 75 % 70 % +10%
Norway 66 % 84 % 54 % 34 % 100 % 100 % 68 % +2%
Poland 37 % 4 % 0 % 41 % 100 % 25 % 28 % +6%
Portugal 60 % 52 % 72 % 80 % 100 % 50 % 67 % +2%
Romania 23 % 4 % 18 % 34 % 100 % 50 % 28 % −3 %
Russia 0 % 8 % 0 % 27 % 0 % 0 % 6 % −1 %
San Marino 0 % 0 % 36 % 0 % 65 % 0 % 14 % 0%
Serbia 48 % 4 % 54 % 0 % 65 % 0 % 30 % +5%
Slovakia 46 % 4 % 18 % 21 % 100 % 25 % 31 % +4%
Slovenia 28 % 34 % 36 % 7 % 100 % 25 % 35 % 0%
Spain 36 % 100 % 74 % 80 % 100 % 50 % 73 % +8%
Sweden 61 % 84 % 36 % 54 % 100 % 75 % 65 % 0%
Switzerland 15 % 40 % 0 % 34 % 100 % 0 % 29 % 0%
Turkey 0 % 4 % 0 % 21 % 100 % 0 % 14 % 0%
Ukraine 0 % 8 % 0 % 21 % 65 % 0 % 12 % 0%
United Kingdom 80 % 97 % 61 % 77 % 100 % 75 % 82 % +5%

International Intersex Forum[edit]

Third International Intersex Forum, Malta, December 2013

To include intersex people in its remit, ILGA-Europe and ILGA have jointly sponsored the only international gathering of intersex activists and organisations. The International Intersex Forum has taken place in Europe annually since 2011.[11][12][13][14]

The third forum was held in Malta in 2013 with 34 people representing 30 organisations from all continents. The closing statement affirmed the existence of intersex people, reaffirmed "the principles of the First and Second International Intersex Fora and extend the demands aiming to end discrimination against intersex people and to ensure the right of bodily integrity, physical autonomy and self-determination". For the first time, participants made a statement on birth registrations, in addition to other human rights issues.[14][15][16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "What is ILGA-Europe?". ILGA-Europe. Retrieved 2014-05-29. 
  2. ^ "NGO Branch, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs". United Nations. Retrieved 2013-11-02. 
  3. ^ Base de donées ONG : European Region of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (ILGA-Europe) Council of Europe, accessed 2 November 2013.
  4. ^ a b c "ILGA-Europe's funding". ILGA-Europe. Retrieved 2014-05-29. 
  5. ^ "Annual Conference". ILGA-Europe. Retrieved 2014-05-29. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f "Issues we work on". ILGA-Europe. 2014. Retrieved 2014-05-29.  Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "work" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page). Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "work" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page). Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "work" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page). Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "work" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page). Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "work" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  7. ^ a b "Score sheets per country". ILGA-Europe. 2014. Retrieved 2014-05-28. 
  8. ^ "UK ranked top in Europe for LGBT rights for third year in a row". Pink News. 2014. Retrieved 2014-05-29. 
  9. ^ "Where is the best place for LGTBI rights in Europe (clue: it's definitely not Russia)?". The Independent. 2014. Retrieved 2014-05-29. 
  10. ^ "Country score changes according to ILGA-Europe Rainbow Europe Map between May 2013 and May 2014" (PDF). ILGA-Europe. 2014. Retrieved 2014-05-29. 
  11. ^ First ever international intersex forum, ILGA-Europe (Creative Commons statement), 6 September 2011
  12. ^ First ever international intersex forum, ILGA, 7 September 2011
  13. ^ Public statement by the third international intersex forum, Organisation Intersex International Australia, 2 December 2013
  14. ^ a b Global intersex community affirms shared goals, Star Observer, December 4, 2013
  15. ^ 3rd International Intersex Forum concluded, ILGA-Europe (Creative Commons statement), 2 December 2013
  16. ^ (Dutch) Derde Internationale Intersekse Forum, Nederlandse Netwerk Intersekse/DSD (NNID), 3 December 2013

External links[edit]