Jewell County, Kansas

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Jewell County, Kansas
County
Jewell County, Kansas courthouse E side 1.JPG
Jewell County courthouse in Mankato
Map of Kansas highlighting Jewell County
Location in the U.S. state of Kansas
Map of the United States highlighting Kansas
Kansas's location in the U.S.
Founded February 26, 1887
Named for Lewis R. Jewell
Seat Mankato
Largest city Mankato
Area
 • Total 914 sq mi (2,367 km2)
 • Land 910 sq mi (2,357 km2)
 • Water 4.6 sq mi (12 km2), 0.5%
Population (est.)
 • (2016) 2,901
 • Density 3.4/sq mi (1.3/km2)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
June 24, 1947 flood of the Republican River on the border of Jewell County, Kansas and Republic County, Kansas near Hardy, Nebraska and Webber, Kansas, just south of Nebraska NE-8 on Kansas 1 Rd/CR-1 bridge over the Republican River. The normal flood stage for the river is at the tree line in the foreground.

Jewell County (county code JW) is a county located in the U.S. state of Kansas. As of the 2010 census, the county population was 3,077.[1] Its county seat and most populous city is Mankato.[2]

History[edit]

Early history[edit]

For many millennia, the Great Plains of North America was inhabited by nomadic Native Americans. From the 16th century to 18th century, the Kingdom of France claimed ownership of large parts of North America. In 1762, after the French and Indian War, France secretly ceded New France to Spain, per the Treaty of Fontainebleau.

19th century[edit]

In 1802, Spain returned most of the land to France, but keeping title to about 7,500 square miles. In 1803, most of the land for modern day Kansas was acquired by the United States from France as part of the 828,000 square mile Louisiana Purchase for 2.83 cents per acre.

In 1854, the Kansas Territory was organized, then in 1861 Kansas became the 34th U.S. state. In 1887, Jewell County was established and named for Lieutenant Colonel Lewis R. Jewell of the 6th Regiment Kansas Volunteer Cavalry.[3]

In 1887, Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway built a branch line from Neva (3 miles west of Strong City) to Superior, Nebraska. This branch line connected Strong City, Neva, Rockland, Diamond Springs, Burdick, Lost Springs, Jacobs, Hope, Navarre, Enterprise, Abilene, Talmage, Manchester, Longford, Oak Hill, Miltonvale, Aurora, Huscher, Concordia, Kackley, Courtland, Webber, Superior. At some point, the line from Neva to Lost Springs was pulled but the right of way has not been abandoned. This branch line was originally called "Strong City and Superior line" but later the name was shortened to the "Strong City line". In 1996, the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway merged with Burlington Northern Railroad and renamed to the current BNSF Railway. Most locals still refer to this railroad as the "Santa Fe".

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 914 square miles (2,370 km2), of which 910 square miles (2,400 km2) is land and 4.6 square miles (12 km2) (0.5%) is water.[4]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870207
188017,4758,342.0%
189019,34910.7%
190019,4200.4%
191018,148−6.5%
192016,240−10.5%
193014,462−10.9%
194011,970−17.2%
19509,698−19.0%
19607,217−25.6%
19706,099−15.5%
19805,241−14.1%
19904,251−18.9%
20003,791−10.8%
20103,077−18.8%
Est. 20162,901[5]−5.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2016[1]

As of the 2000 census,[10] there were 3,791 people, 1,695 households, and 1,098 families residing in the county. The population density was 4 people per square mile (2/km²). There were 2,103 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.79% White, 0.34% Native American, 0.05% Asian, 0.03% Black or African American, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.05% from other races, and 0.71% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.71% of the population.

There were 1,695 households out of which 23.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.10% were married couples living together, 4.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.20% were non-families. 32.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.80.

In the county, the population was spread out with 21.90% under the age of 18, 4.40% from 18 to 24, 21.50% from 25 to 44, 26.20% from 45 to 64, and 25.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46 years. For every 100 females there were 97.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,538, and the median income for a family was $36,953. Males had a median income of $24,821 versus $18,170 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,644. About 8.40% of families and 11.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.80% of those under age 18 and 10.90% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

Presidential elections[edit]

Presidential Elections Results
Presidential Elections Results[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 81.9% 1,223 12.1% 180 6.1% 91
2012 82.5% 1,235 15.3% 229 2.2% 33
2008 77.7% 1,231 19.8% 313 2.5% 40
2004 78.1% 1,495 20.1% 385 1.8% 35
2000 74.6% 1,400 20.3% 380 5.2% 97
1996 69.0% 1,374 20.9% 417 10.0% 200
1992 45.7% 1,050 23.7% 546 30.6% 704
1988 68.0% 1,546 30.1% 684 1.9% 44
1984 76.5% 1,992 22.4% 583 1.1% 29
1980 72.8% 2,074 20.3% 578 6.9% 197
1976 57.5% 1,592 40.1% 1,111 2.4% 67
1972 74.0% 2,242 23.7% 716 2.3% 70
1968 66.2% 2,172 25.7% 842 8.2% 268
1964 53.6% 1,895 45.3% 1,601 1.1% 39
1960 72.3% 2,914 27.2% 1,095 0.6% 24
1956 75.5% 3,395 23.0% 1,034 1.5% 67
1952 80.9% 4,162 17.2% 885 1.9% 100
1948 63.2% 3,143 31.6% 1,574 5.2% 258
1944 74.2% 3,754 24.0% 1,216 1.8% 89
1940 71.6% 4,591 26.8% 1,719 1.6% 105
1936 57.8% 3,849 41.7% 2,780 0.5% 35
1932 48.2% 3,324 48.8% 3,367 3.0% 205
1928 76.9% 4,583 21.6% 1,289 1.5% 88
1924 64.8% 4,342 27.8% 1,861 7.4% 495
1920 66.0% 3,925 31.9% 1,899 2.1% 126
1916 39.8% 3,022 55.1% 4,180 5.1% 383
1912 20.5% 906 42.4% 1,871 37.1% 1,640
1908 53.5% 2,410 42.9% 1,932 3.6% 164
1904 68.1% 2,720 23.2% 927 8.7% 348
1900 52.0% 2,448 46.5% 2,192 1.5% 71
1896 44.4% 1,902 54.7% 2,342 0.9% 39
1892 45.6% 1,963 54.4% 2,343
1888 54.8% 2,285 24.0% 999 21.2% 885

Like all of Kansas outside the eastern cities, Jewell County is overwhelmingly Republican. The only Democratic presidential candidates to win a majority in the county have been Woodrow Wilson in 1916 and William Jennings Bryan in 1896, and the last Democrat to win a plurality was Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932. Since 1940 only Lyndon Johnson in 1964 and Jimmy Carter in 1976 have exceeded 31 percent of the county’s vote, a devotion to the GOP comparable to famous Appalachia Unionist strongholds like Avery County, North Carolina or Grant County, West Virginia.

Laws[edit]

Although the Kansas Constitution was amended in 1986 to allow the sale of alcoholic liquor by the individual drink with the approval of voters. Jewell County restaurants serve only 3.2 beer an no hard alcohol. [12][13]

Communities[edit]

2005 KDOT Map of Jewell County (map legend)

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Jewell County is divided into twenty-five townships. None of the cities within the county are considered governmentally independent, and all figures for the townships include those of the cities. In the following table, the population center is the largest city (or cities) included in that township's population total, if it is of a significant size.

Township FIPS Population
center
Population Population
density
/km² (/sq mi)
Land area
km² (sq mi)
Water area
km² (sq mi)
Water % Geographic coordinates
Allen 01225 43 0 (1) 90 (35) 0 (0) 0.02% 39°36′46″N 97°59′49″W / 39.61278°N 97.99694°W / 39.61278; -97.99694
Athens 02975 74 1 (2) 102 (39) 0 (0) 0% 39°36′13″N 98°20′7″W / 39.60361°N 98.33528°W / 39.60361; -98.33528
Browns Creek 08725 64 1 (2) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.02% 39°36′13″N 98°13′33″W / 39.60361°N 98.22583°W / 39.60361; -98.22583
Buffalo 09125 574 5 (14) 105 (41) 0 (0) 0.07% 39°40′23″N 98°8′38″W / 39.67306°N 98.14389°W / 39.67306; -98.14389
Burr Oak 09550 338 3 (9) 102 (39) 0 (0) 0% 39°52′9″N 98°18′36″W / 39.86917°N 98.31000°W / 39.86917; -98.31000
Calvin 10075 65 1 (2) 81 (31) 0 (0) 0.04% 39°42′19″N 98°12′51″W / 39.70528°N 98.21417°W / 39.70528; -98.21417
Center 11750 1,100 12 (31) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.07% 39°47′15″N 98°12′38″W / 39.78750°N 98.21056°W / 39.78750; -98.21056
Erving 21575 60 1 (2) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.08% 39°36′13″N 98°26′21″W / 39.60361°N 98.43917°W / 39.60361; -98.43917
Esbon 21625 222 2 (6) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.08% 39°48′15″N 98°26′41″W / 39.80417°N 98.44472°W / 39.80417; -98.44472
Grant 27725 220 2 (6) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0% 39°46′58″N 97°59′28″W / 39.78278°N 97.99111°W / 39.78278; -97.99111
Harrison 30350 52 1 (1) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0% 39°57′58″N 98°13′19″W / 39.96611°N 98.22194°W / 39.96611; -98.22194
Highland 31900 49 1 (1) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.03% 39°57′49″N 98°26′42″W / 39.96361°N 98.44500°W / 39.96361; -98.44500
Holmwood 32800 49 1 (1) 92 (36) 0 (0) 0.05% 39°51′43″N 98°12′24″W / 39.86194°N 98.20667°W / 39.86194; -98.20667
Ionia 34375 100 1 (3) 102 (39) 0 (0) 0.11% 39°40′55″N 98°19′55″W / 39.68194°N 98.33194°W / 39.68194; -98.33194
Jackson 34800 123 1 (3) 92 (35) 1 (0) 0.90% 39°56′52″N 97°59′53″W / 39.94778°N 97.99806°W / 39.94778; -97.99806
Limestone 40450 49 0 (1) 102 (39) 0 (0) 0.02% 39°47′38″N 98°18′45″W / 39.79389°N 98.31250°W / 39.79389; -98.31250
Montana 47800 93 1 (3) 94 (36) 0 (0) 0.14% 39°57′55″N 98°5′21″W / 39.96528°N 98.08917°W / 39.96528; -98.08917
Odessa 52125 34 0 (1) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.02% 39°41′52″N 98°27′29″W / 39.69778°N 98.45806°W / 39.69778; -98.45806
Prairie 57400 172 2 (5) 96 (37) 0 (0) 0.02% 39°37′40″N 98°4′12″W / 39.62778°N 98.07000°W / 39.62778; -98.07000
Richland 59375 36 0 (1) 83 (32) 9 (4) 10.13% 39°53′41″N 98°5′40″W / 39.89472°N 98.09444°W / 39.89472; -98.09444
Sinclair 65675 67 1 (2) 89 (34) 3 (1) 2.81% 39°52′41″N 97°59′52″W / 39.87806°N 97.99778°W / 39.87806; -97.99778
Vicksburg 73725 28 0 (1) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0% 39°42′4″N 97°58′45″W / 39.70111°N 97.97917°W / 39.70111; -97.97917
Walnut 75000 80 1 (2) 102 (39) 0 (0) 0.07% 39°57′58″N 98°20′12″W / 39.96611°N 98.33667°W / 39.96611; -98.33667
Washington 75650 50 1 (1) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0% 39°47′3″N 98°5′36″W / 39.78417°N 98.09333°W / 39.78417; -98.09333
White Mound 77925 49 1 (1) 93 (36) 0 (0) 0.12% 39°51′53″N 98°26′21″W / 39.86472°N 98.43917°W / 39.86472; -98.43917
Sources: "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files". U.S. Census Bureau, Geography Division. Archived from the original on 2002-08-02. 

Education[edit]

Unified school districts[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 12, 2011. Retrieved July 26, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 169. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved July 26, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 26, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 26, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 26, 2014. 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  11. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  12. ^ "Map of Wet and Dry Counties". Alcoholic Beverage Control, Kansas Department of Revenue. November 2004. Archived from the original on 2007-10-08. Retrieved 2007-01-21. 
  13. ^ "Kansas Liquor by the Drink Map (Wet and Dry Counties)" (PDF). Kansas Department of Revenue - Alcoholic Beverage Control. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-04-29. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

County
Historical
Maps

Coordinates: 39°48′N 98°14′W / 39.800°N 98.233°W / 39.800; -98.233