Methyldichlorophosphine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Methyldichlorophosphine
Methyldichlorophosphine.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Methylphosphonous dichloride
Other names
Methyl phosphonous dichloride, Dichloromethylphosphine
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.010.575 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 211-631-8
UN number 2845
  • InChI=1S/CH3Cl2P/c1-4(2)3/h1H3
    Key: CDPKWOKGVUHZFR-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CP(Cl)Cl
Properties
CH3Cl2P
Molar mass 116.91 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Methyldichlorophosphine (alternatively known as dichloro(methyl)phosphane and methyl phosphonous dichloride) is an organophosphorus compound with the chemical formula CH3PCl2. It is a colorless, corrosive, flammable, and highly reactive liquid with a pungent odor.

Preparation[edit]

Methyldichlorophosphine is produced by alkylation of phosphorus trichloride with methyl iodide followed by reduction of the resulting phosphonium salt with iron powder:[1] The compound is an intermediate for the synthesis of other chemicals for instance dimethylphenylphosphine:

CH3I + PCl3 + AlCl3 → [CH3PCl3]+AlCl3I
[CH3PCl3]+AlCl3I + Fe → CH3PCl2 + FeClI + AlCl3

Uses[edit]

Methyldichlorophosphine belongs to the group of halophosphines, some of which are used as intermediates in the production of plant protection agents, stabilizers for plastics, and catalysts. It is a precursor of the herbicide Glufosinate. It is also used in the production of flameproofing compounds.[2]

Due to the recycling problem of phosphoryl chloride, SW was adopted in step three of the DMHP process in the preparation of GB.[3] SW was also adopted as a standard precursor to V agents, having been used to prepare QL for unitary and binary VX. SW was the first agent adopted to prepare VX in one pot reaction by aqueous medium.[4]

Safety[edit]

It is also toxic if inhaled, can cause burns upon contact with the skin and eyes, and releases fumes of hydrochloric acid in moist environments.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robert Engel, JaimeLee Iolani Cohen (2004). Synthesis of Carbon–Phosphorus Bonds. CRC. ISBN 0-8493-1617-0.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Phosphorus Compounds, Organic", Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry (7th ed.), 2007, doi:10.1002/14356007.a19_545.pub2
  3. ^ Sass, S; Morgan, C. U. Chlorination End-Point Indication by Conductivity and Color Change (Step III, DMHP Process). Formal rept.
  4. ^ cit-OPDC. The preparatory manual to chemical warfare. Vol 1: V agents: X
  5. ^ Pubchem. "Dichloro(methyl)phosphane". pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 19 April 2018.