Taushiro language

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Taushiro
Pinche
Region Peru
Ethnicity 20 (2002?)[1]
Native speakers
1 (2017)[2]
Language codes
ISO 639-3 trr
Glottolog taus1253[3]

Taushiro, also known as Pinche or Pinchi, is a nearly extinct possible language isolate of the Peruvian Amazon near Ecuador. In 2000 SIL counted one speaker in an ethnic population of 20. Documentation was done in the mid-1970s by Neftalí Alicea. The last living speaker of Taushiro, Amadeo García García, was profiled in the New York Times in 2017.[4]

The first glossary of Taushiro contained 200 words and were collected by Daniel Velie in 1971.[4]

Following Tovar (1961), Loukotka (1968), and Tovar (1984), Kaufman (1994) notes that while Taushiro has been linked to the Zaparoan languages, it shares greater lexical correspondences with Kandoshi and especially with Omurano. In 2007 he classified Taushiro and Omurano (but not Kandoshi) as Saparo–Yawan languages.

Amadeo García García[edit]

In June 2015, Amadeo García García was residing in "Intuto on the Tigre River in the northeastern Peruvian region of Loreto." Zachary O’Hagan did targeted field work with him on topics such as ethnohistory, genealogy, sociocultural practices, lexicon, and grammar.[5]

As of December 2017 government linguists from Peru’s Ministry of Culture, working with Amadeo, have created a database of 1,500 Taushiro words, 27 stories, and three songs.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Taushiro language at Ethnologue (15th ed., 2005)
  2. ^ Taushiro at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  3. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Taushiro". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  4. ^ a b c Casey, Nicholas (2017-12-26). "Thousands Once Spoke His Language in the Amazon. Now, He's the Only One". New York Times. Retrieved 2017-12-26. 
  5. ^ O’Hagan, Zachary (November 17, 2015). "Taushiro and the Status of Language Isolates in Northwest Amazonia" (PDF). University of California, Berkeley. Fieldwork Forum. Retrieved December 26, 2017.