Bridgeton railway station

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For the closed Glasgow City and District Railway station called Bridgeton, see Bridgeton Central railway station.
Bridgeton National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Baile na Drochaid
Bridgeton
Bridgeton station, looking south east towards Dalmarnock
Location
Place Bridgeton
Local authority Glasgow
Coordinates 55°50′54″N 4°13′30″W / 55.8484°N 4.2250°W / 55.8484; -4.2250Coordinates: 55°50′54″N 4°13′30″W / 55.8484°N 4.2250°W / 55.8484; -4.2250
Grid reference NS607639
Operations
Station code BDG
Managed by First ScotRail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2002/03  0.140 million
2004/05 Increase 0.207 million
2005/06 Increase 0.240 million
2006/07 Increase 0.286 million
2007/08 Increase 0.309 million
2008/09 Increase 0.467 million
2009/10 Decrease 0.394 million
2010/11 Increase 0.409 million
2011/12 Increase 0.489 million
2012/13 Increase 0.617 million
Passenger Transport Executive
PTE SPT
History
1 November 1895 Opened
5 October 1964 Closed
5 November 1979 Re-opened
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Bridgeton from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
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The station in 1961

Bridgeton railway station serves the Bridgeton district of Glasgow, Scotland and is a station on the Argyle Line, 1¾ miles (3 km) south east of Glasgow Central. The station is operated by First ScotRail who also provide all train services.

History[edit]

It was opened on 1 November 1895 when the line between Glasgow Green and Rutherglen was opened by the Glasgow Central Railway. The station became a junction with the opening of the line to Carmyle and Kirkhill on 1 February 1897. Westbound services ran to Stobcross, from where they could proceed to Possil via Maryhill Central, Partickhill and points north via the connection to the Stobcross Railway or onto the Lanarkshire and Dunbartonshire Railway to Dumbarton & Balloch Central via Partick Central & Dalmuir Riverside.

In 1956 the line was re-signalled with colour light signals controlled from the re-equipped signal boxes at Bridgeton Cross Junction and Stobcross Junction. However, the station was closed along with both lines on 5 October 1964 as a result of the Beeching Axe. The tracks were subsequently lifted, but the station & tunnels were left intact.

As part of the Argyle Line project, the Rutherglen line platforms reopened on 5 November 1979, offering regular commuter services into Central Station (low level) and on towards the western suburbs.

Accidents and incidents[edit]

  • On 2 February 1929, a passenger train was diverted into the bay platform due to a signalman's error. Several people were injured when the train crashed through the buffers.[1]

Services[edit]

1979[edit]

When the Argyle Line was opened in 1979, there were six trains an hour to the Hamilton Circle, from Dalmuir, with two services an hour going as far west as Dumbarton Central. The hourly service between Lanark and Milngavie ran non-stop through Bridgeton station.

2008[edit]

Four trains per hour daily head westbound towards Glasgow Central and beyond (Milngavie and Dalmuir) and eastbound towards Motherwell (with services onward to Lanark).

Routes[edit]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Dalmarnock   First ScotRail
Argyle Line
  Argyle Street
Historical railways
Parkhead
Line and station closed
  Caledonian Railway
Glasgow Central Railway
  Glasgow Green
Line open; station closed
Dalmarnock

References[edit]

  1. ^ Earnshaw, Alan (1989). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 5. Penryn: Atlantic Books. p. 23. ISBN 0-906899-35-4. 
Sources
  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-8526-0508-1. OCLC 60251199. 
  • Jowett, Alan (March 1989). Jowett's Railway Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland: From Pre-Grouping to the Present Day (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-8526-0086-1. OCLC 22311137.