List of fictional cats in literature

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This list of fictional cats in literature is subsidiary to the list of fictional cats. It is restricted solely to notable feline characters from notable literary works of fiction. For characters that appear in several separate works, only the earliest work will be recorded here.

Named[edit]

Character Earliest Appearance and Author Notes
Alonzo Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
A black and white tom, and is often considered the 'second-hand-man' to Munkustrap. He saves Demeter from Macavity, and is the first to attack him after he defeats Munkustrap.
Aristotle The Nine Lives of Aristotle
by
Dick King-Smith
A kitten depends on his nine lives and the magical powers of his owner (a friendly witch) in order to emerge safely from various adventures.[1][2][3][4][5]
Bangs Sam, Bangs and Moonshine
by
Evaline Ness
Bangs is a little girl's cat in this winner of the 1967 Caldecott Medal. In a variant of Aesop's The Boy Who Cried Wolf, Samantha romanticizes her life, pretending that Bangs can talk and that her mother was a mermaid. When a neighboring boy, Thomas, believes her and goes to search for the mermaid, Bangs follow him; they are caught in a seastorm and lost. They return safely, and Sam learns the folly of spreading "moonshine," or nonsense.[6]
Behemoth The Master and Margarita
by
Mikhail Bulgakov
An abnormally large black cat who walks on his hind legs and carries a pistol. Being a member of the Devil's entourage, he is wicked and devious. He has a penchant for chess, vodka, and pickled mushrooms.[7][8]
Bombalurina Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
A flirtatious red Queen with a white chest and black spots and marks.[9]
Borregad Lyrec
by
Gregory Frost
Borregad and Lyrec are of an energy-based race who can shapeshift. When he and Lyrec hunt their archenemy into another world, Lyrec takes human shape, but Borregad has only enough strength to take the form of a cat.[10] Borregad, a Jester figure, finds a variant of Guinness stout to cheer himself in this fantasy world.
Bustopher Jones Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
A parody of an Edwardian gentleman of leisure and is described as the St. James's Street cat, a regular visitor to many gentlemen's clubs in the area, including Drones, Blimp's, and The Tomb. He is also extremely obese.
Buttercup "The Hunger Games Trilogy"
by
Suzanne Collins
Primrose's cat, hated by Katniss.
Captain Wow "The Game of Rat and Dragon"
by
Cordwainer Smith
A telepathic tom cat who works happily alongside humans to fight outer space monsters known as Dragons, Captain Wow perceives them as rats and is a successful slayer of these invaders.
Carbonel Carbonel: the King of the Cats
by
Barbara Sleigh
Carbonel: the King of the Cats is the first of a tripartite series about this royal cat, all published between 1955 and 1978. (Reprinted versions have different titles: Carbonel: the King of the Cats, Carbonel: the King of Cats, Carbonel: the Prince of Cats, and so on.) Carbonel's feline subjects miss him after the witch Mrs. Cantrip abducted him. Unfortunately, he can't return to his throne until the enslavement spell which Mrs. Cantrip cast on him is undone.[11] He is helped by the human children Rosemary and John. Carbonel is depicted as a black cat, as shown by the book cover illustrations of a wide variety of reprints. Library Journal called it "A must for all libraries." New York Journal-American wrote, "A truly bewitching story reminiscent of Alice in Wonderland," and The Horn Book Magazine enthused, "Magic and everyday life blend smoothly in this highly enjoyable fantasy, perfect for reading aloud."
Cat Breakfast at Tiffany's
by
Truman Capote
Pet of Holly Golightly.
Cat It's Like This, Cat
by
Emily Cheney Neville
A stray cat that 14-year-old Dave Mitchell adopts as a pet and confidant.[12] Winner of the 1964 Newbery Medal.
Cat Morgan Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by T. S. Eliot
Retired and works as a doorman at the book publishers Faber and Faber. He is a gruff but likeable character.
The Cat in the Hat The Cat in the Hat
by
Dr. Seuss
A mischievous anthropomorphic feline from Dr. Seuss's book of the same name.
Cheshire Cat Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
by
Lewis Carroll
Sometimes raises philosophical points that annoy or baffle Alice. It does, however, appear to cheer her up when it turns up suddenly at the Queen of Hearts' croquet field, and when sentenced to death baffles everyone by having made its head appear without its body, sparking a massive argument between the executioner and the King and Queen of Hearts about whether something that does not have a body can indeed be beheaded.
"Church" (Winston Churchill) Pet Sematary
by
Stephen King
This unfortunate cat is killed by a truck, buried in the ancient burial ground of the title, then returns home, in a manner reminiscent of the dead son in the horror story "The Monkey's Paw".
C'mell "Alpha Ralpha Boulevard"
and "The Ballad of Lost C'Mell"
by
Cordwainer Smith
C'mell is an uplifted Persian cat with reddish fur who looks, in these stories, like a red-headed woman with discreet (and discrete) feline features. She is the heroine of both stories, being a far-future cat/woman with psychic powers including telepathy. She courageously helps her society, both in gaining more rights for "underpeople" (animals given intellect, speech, and physical make-overs) such as herself and in saving the lives of humans.[13] She appears in only two short stories, but remains "the most enduringly popular cat in science fiction and fantasy."[13]
Coricopat Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
Male twin to Tantomile. Coricopat and Tantomile are often portrayed as psychic cats, as they sense the presence of danger before it becomes apparent to the other characters.
Crookshanks Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
by
J.K. Rowling
The pet cat of Hermione Granger. He is described as having a "squashed face," which was inspired by a real cat Rowling once saw, which she said looked like it had run face first into a brick wall; most likely a Persian. Hermione buys Crookshanks from a shop in Diagon Alley out of sympathy, as nobody wants him because of his behaviour and his squashed looking-face. Rowling has confirmed that Crookshanks is half Kneazle,[14] an intelligent, cat-like creature who can detect when they are around untrustworthy people, explaining his higher than normal cat intelligence and stature.
Demeter Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
Demeter is black and gold with a few patches of white and red or orange (and she wears gloves instead of arm warmers, giving her a more elegant touch.) She is the cat who unmasks Macavity when he tries to disguise as Old Deuteronomy.
Dinah Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
by
Lewis Carroll
Alice's pet kitten in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In Through the Looking-Glass, she is an adult with kittens of her own (Kitty and Snowdrop).
Djibi Djibi, the Kitten

by
Felix Salten

An independent cat who survives a drowning attempt and chooses for herself where to live.
Dragon Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert O'Brien The farmer's cat who killed Mrs. Frisby's husband.
Dulcie Cat on the Edge
by
Shirley Rousseau Murphey
"The sharpest feline sleuth on the mystery scene--one cool cat, a clawed and formidable enemy of crime."[15] Dulcie has solved numerous murders and other crimes with the help of her mate Joe Grey. Dulcie is also a library cat. (For the Joe Grey Cat Mysteries series, Murphy has received eleven national Cat Writers' Association awards for best novel of the year.)
Electra Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
One of the youngest female kittens in the tribe of Jellicle cats. Like many of the other young feline characters, she is in awe of the Rum Tum Tugger, a flirtatious roguish male main character.
Fiddle Charmed Life by Diana Wynne Jones Gwendolen used one of Cat's lives to turn his fiddle into a cat named Fiddle.
Findus Pettson and Findus
by
Sven Nordqvist
A cat who dresses up and talks with his old Swedish farmer, Pettson.
Firestar Warriors: Into the Wild
by
Erin Hunter
The main character for the first arc of Warriors books (the "Original Series") as well as a major supporting character for the subsequent arcs, he is a flame-colored tom with deep green eyes.
Francis Felidae
by
Akif Pirinçci
In this 1989 German-language mystery,[16] which has been translated into 17 languages and became a worldwide best-seller, Francis ("a wise-ass of a cat and new to the town"[17]), investigates the murders of several cats. Publishers Weekly wrote, "A clever, offbeat thriller in which the sleuth and most of the other main characters are cats, this ... won Germany's prize for best crime novel of the year in 1990. As an allegory on Germany's Nazi past, it is facile and ambivalent. The detective/narrator, Francis, an irrepressibly curious house cat, deduces that whoever is murdering the neighborhood tabbys has a warped mind and is attempting to breed a 'super race' of felines."[18] Felidae was adapted into a 1994 German animated neo-noir film directed by Michael Schaack and starring Ulrich Tukur as Francis.
Fritti Tailchaser Tailchaser's Song
by
Tad Williams
Tailchaser joins with friends Pouncequick and Roofshadow on an epic quest.
Ginger The Tale of Ginger and Pickles
by
Beatrix Potter
A yellow tomcat who ran a shop with his partner Pickles, a terrier.
Ginger The Last Battle
by
C. S. Lewis
A talking cat of Narnia, he is a four-legged member of the triumvirate who cause civil war and real terror among his country-mates. Ginger lies at every opportunity ("Aslan would want you to do this!"). His co-leaders are Rishda Tarkaan, Calormene captain leading the battle against Narnia with the sole motive of bellicosity, and Shift, a greedy ape who seeks power to sate his gluttony. Ginger is finally punished for his evil deeds by having his ability for speech removed and being banned from Aslan's Country.
Great Rumpus Cat Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
A hero in the world of the book and the musical.
Greebo Discworld
by
Terry Pratchett
A foul-tempered, one-eyed grey tomcat whose owner, Nanny Ogg, insists against all the evidence that he is a sweet, harmless kitten. In the course of the books, he has killed two vampires, eating at least one of them in the novel Witches Abroad:

"The bat squirmed under his claw. It seemed to Greebo's small cat brain that it was trying to change its shape, and he wasn't having any of that from a mouse with wings on."

Griddlebone Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
Companion to Mungojerrie, a white fluffy Persian queen who first appears in the poem Growltiger's Last Stand. She inadvertently leads to the demise of her suitor, the dreaded Growltiger, at the hands (paws) of a gang of Siamese cats.
Growltiger Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
A pirate cat.
Gummitch Space-Time for Springers
by
Fritz Leiber
As Fritz Leiber, a cat-lover, describes him, "Gummitch was a superkitten, as he knew very well, with an I.Q. of about 160. Of course, he didn't talk. But everybody knows that I.Q. tests based on language ability are very one-sided. Besides, he would talk as soon as they started setting a place for him at table and pouring him coffee."[19] Gummitch doesn't get to prove himself by coffee; he proves himself by saving a life in his household.
Harry Cat The Cricket in Times Square
by
George Selden
Friend and guide to New York City for Tucker Mouse and Chester Cricket. The novel was a 1961 Newbery Honor Book.
Joe Grey Cat on the Edge
by
Shirley Rousseau Murphy
A talking gray-and-white tomcat that has solved various murders and other crimes with the help of his mate Dulcie. Joe Grey has a docked tail after his tail was broken by a drunkard. (For the Joe Grey Cat Mysteries series, Murphy has received eleven national Cat Writers' Association awards for best novel of the year.)
Jellylorum Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
Jennie[20] Jennie
by
Paul Gallico
A young boy named Peter is transformed into a cat after an accident, and is taken in by Jennie and taught the ways of cats.
Jennyanydots Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
Jupiter The Deptford Mice
by
Robin Jarvis
Worshipped as the Lord of All by the rats, feared like a dark god of the sewers.
Kevin the Kitten Tabitha Miggins: Ship's Cat (On The Pill Ferry)
by
Mark Clinton Jones writing as Philippa Perry
Lavinia's unlikely coincidence and bad-judgement-prone kitten. Tabitha Miggins' replacement as Colonial Companion in Singapore.
Khat Midnite
by
Randolph Stow
He is a talking Siamese cat who persuades Captain Midnite to become a bushranger and formulates his plans.
Kitsa The Indian in the Cupboard
by
Lynne Reid Banks
She is a housecat who acts as an occasional antagonist, frightening and hunting Omri's animated toy indian. Kitsa is black and white, with green eyes, noted for her independence and disobedience.
Kitty Bad Kitty
by
Nick Bruel
She is a housecat who wreaks havoc around her owner's home when she is in a bad mood, hence the name. She has black fur and a white tuft of fur on her chest.
Lady May "The Game of Rat and Dragon"
by
Cordwainer Smith
A telepathic cat who works happily alongside humans to fight outer space monsters known as Dragons, she perceives them as rats and is a successful slayer of these invaders. Her human partner, Underhill, is in love with her, knowing that no human female mind could ever equal the Lady's.
Lavinia Tabitha Miggins: Ship's Cat (On The Pill Ferry)
by
Mark Clinton Jones writing as Philippa Perry
Lifelong friend of Tabitha Miggins and mother of the coincidence-prone Kevin, now living at The Home For Retired Colonial Companions (Feline) at Ham Green, near Pill. Enjoys jigsaws and the odd sweet sherry.
Leonardo "Me and My Cat?"
by
Satoshi Kitamura
A cat who switches with his companion, a boy called Nicholas.
Liszt "Edward the Conqueror"
by
Roald Dahl
A woman believes a stray cat who appreciates her piano music is a reincarnation of Franz Liszt, to the disgust of her cat-hating husband.
Macavity Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
A devilish cat. Part of the poem about him says, "Macavity, Macavity, there's no one like Macavity, For he's a fiend in feline shape, a monster of depravity".
Maisie MacKenzie Maisie Comes to Morningside
by
Aileen Paterson
An anthropomorphic cat who lives in Morningside, Edinburgh, Maisie wears a kilt and her adventures have taken her from Glasgow to New York to Brazil and even climbing in the Himalayas. Her feline friends are Professor Mackenzie and Mrs McKitty.[21] Maisie is featured in over 20 books, and has a line of soft toys; the books have been adapted for a television series, with dubbing by Scottish comedian Stanley Baxter.[22]
Maurice The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents
by
Terry Pratchett
The eponymous fast-talking confidence trickster cat who operates a 'pied-piper' scam in the Discworld series of books - organising teams of rats to infest a town and then rapidly withdraw after payment to a 'tame' human.
Mehitabel Archy and Mehitabel
by
Don Marquis
An alley cat who is the best friend of the cockroach Archy. Drawn in a series of newspaper comics, she is "a toujours gai ["always in a good mood"] old dame with the soul of Cleopatra." A song, "Toujours Gai," was written for Mehitabel in the 1971 animated musical comedy film Shinbone Alley. It was later covered by Eartha Kitt on her CD album Purr-fect: Greatest Hits.[23]
Mickey Barbary
by
Vonda McIntyre
A cat owned by Barbary, a twelve-year-old girl, that travels with her to live on a space station.
Mickey Miggs The Kitten Who Thought He Was A Mouse
by
Miriam Norton
An abandoned kitten raised by the Miggs mouse family, who was not aware that he was a cat until he was befriended by and the children Peggy and Paul and the household cat Hazel.
Midnight Louie Crystal Days
by
Carole Nelson Douglas
20 Pound (9 kg) tomcat companion to (and fellow investigator with) amateur sleuth, Temple Barr occasionally assisted by his sire 3 O'Clock Louie, his Ma Barker and her 24th Street gang, and his kit Midnight Louise.
Minoes Minoes
by
Annie M.G. Schmidt
A cat who gets transformed into a human by a chemical accident.
Miss Moppet The Story of Miss Moppet
by
Beatrix Potter
One of Tabitha Twitchit's daughters.
Mister The Dresden Files
by
Jim Butcher
A bob-tailed grey tomcat belonging to the wizard Harry Dresden. He is often used as a vessel for Bob (a spirit of intellect) to inhabit on intelligence missions.
Mittens The Tale of Tom Kitten
by
Beatrix Potter
One of Tabitha Twitchit's daughters.
Mr. Mistoffelees Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
Mrs. Norris Harry Potter series
by
J. K. Rowling
The pet cat of Hogwarts caretaker Argus Filch. She patrols the corridors of the school looking for students skipping class, often foreshadowing the appearance of Mr. Filch himself.
Mog Mog the Forgetful Cat
by
Judith Kerr
Faithful pet of the Thomas family.
Moxie The Subtle Knife
by
Philip Pullman
Will's cat who leads him through the window to Citta'gazze, where he meets Lyra. Later, Will's daemon settles as a cat.
Mungojerrie Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
Munkustrap Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
Nigger Man The Rats in the Walls
by
H. P. Lovecraft
Plays a pivotal role.
Noboru Wataya The Wind Up Bird Chronicle
by
Haruki Murakami
Later renamed Mackerel.
Old Deuteronomy Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
Orlando A Camping Holiday
by
Kathleen Hale
The eponymous hero.
Peter "The Smile of the Sphinx"
by
William F. Temple
This cat is thought, by the narrator, to be an extraordinarily stupid cat "who could never learn the simplest of tricks";[24] in fact, Peter is extraordinarily brilliant. He is part of a race of Felidae who originally lived on the Moon and who came to Earth, ages ago, to enjoy being spoiled by the Egyptians. This science fiction tale explains why dogs howl at the Moon, why the Great Sphinx of Giza has its shape, and even why the Moon has craters.
Petronius the Arbiter (Pete) The Door into Summer
by
Robert A. Heinlein
The smart, loving cat of protagonist Daniel Boone Davis, who occasionally carries him in a carrying-bag and gives him saucers of Ginger ale to drink. Dan calls him Petronius the Arbiter because he thinks that Pete is a good arbiter (judge) of personality. If Pete doesn't like someone, Dan will distrust that person; Pete has always been proved right.
Pixel The Cat Who Walks Through Walls
by
Robert Heinlein
The title character of the book, who has an inexplicable tendency to be wherever the narrator happens to be. In one scene Pixel does, in fact, walk through a wall, and it is explained that Pixel is too young to know that such behavior is impossible.
Pluto The Black Cat
by
Edgar Allan Poe
Pluto is the narrator's cat. After becoming an alcoholic he starts abusing the cat, then trying unsuccessfully to kill it. When his wife intervenes in one incident he kills her instead then bricks the body up in a wall. The narrator is caught when the police come and hear sounds behind the wall, where the narrator accidentally entombed the still-living cat along with its mistress.
Princess Arjumand, aka 'Dearum JuJu' To Say Nothing of the Dog
by
Connie Willis
Princess Arjumand is the beloved pet of Tocelyn 'Tossie' Mering in the 19th century whose great^nth granddaughter in the 21st century will control a very large endowment that the time travel faculty of Oxford greatly needs. Princess Arjumand is brought into the future to save her from drowning and sets off the plot of the book when the hero is tasked with returning her to her own time. Is particularly fond of goldfish.
Ralph Ralph, or, What's Eating the Folks in Fatchakulla County?
by
Ned Crabb
Ralph weighs over 200 pounds,[25] so he is a large kitty, but not a mean one, in this comic novel set in a fictional county of Florida. This murder mystery gives the "Who Did It?" answer away on the dust jacket illustration and becomes a fun "Whydunit" as the novel explores various characters, including the family that raises giant cats and a number of local villains who are eaten.
Ralph Rotten Ralph
by
Jack Gantos
A mischievous red cat who enjoys playing mean, practical jokes on his family.
Roger Cat out of Hell

by

Lynne Truss

A cat born in the 1930s that found he was immortal by supernatural means. Very educated in his own manner and helps the characters in the story.
Ribby The Tale of the Pie and the Patty-Pan
by
Beatrix Potter
A cat with a love for mouse pie, a good friend of the dog Duchess and cousin to Tabitha.
Rum Tum Tugger Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats by T. S. Eliot
Rumpelteazer Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
Sagwa Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat
by
Amy Tan
A kitten who gained her Siamese markings by accident. She is capable of writing in Chinese with her tail.
Sampson The Church Mice series by Graham Oakley A cat that lives at a church and looks after mice.
Scarface Claw Hairy Maclary from Donaldson's Dairy
and various sequels
by
Lynley Dodd
A tough cat who scares Hairy Maclary and his canine companions, and even scares himself.
Simpkin The Tailor of Gloucester
by
Beatrix Potter
The Tailor's pet cat who fetches an essential cherry-coloured silk twist, but angrily hides it after he finds the tailor released his captive mice. After a change of heart, he gives back the twist.
Sir Claude "The Cat" Blinky Bill the Movie
by
Dorothy Wall
Sir Claude is the feral cat his eye of green and purple and his tail has been cut by the trap who tires to kill Blinky Bill.
Skimbleshanks Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats
by
T. S. Eliot
Slinky Malinki Slinky Malinki
by
Lynley Dodd
The stalking and lurking adventurous cat who is a common cat during the day but becomes a thief as night falls.[26]
Small Bob House of Hades
by
Rick Riordan
Small Bob is Bob, AKA Iapetuse's skeleton cat in Tartarus. He is a dead cat, only made from bones. His image flickers, making him seem different at times.[27]
Sprockets Mission to Universe
by
Gordon R. Dickson
Sprockets is a stowaway feral kitten who becomes spaceship mascot. The crew members superstitiously believe that his finally learning to purr will portend success in their search for an inhabitable planet.[28][29]
Squire Gingivere Mossflower
by
Brian Jacques
Squire Julian Gingivere was odd among cats in the fact that he was a vegetarian. He lived with the owl Captain Snow, but the owl's appetite for meat, his bad table manners and their conflicting personalities led to a disagreement and then separation.
Stew-Cat, Blue-Cat and Clue-Cat The Thief of Always
by
Clive Barker
These three cats are the friendly familiars of the magical Holiday House.
Tab Watership Down
by
Richard Adams
Tab is one of a gang of talking cats who live at Nuthanger Farm. When the protagonist rabbits raid the farm, the cats prove to be bold, dangerous enemies and are subdued only by the wits of Hazel and Blackberry, the brawny courage of Bigwig, and the speed of Dandelion. On his next trip to the farm, Hazel is assaulted by the green-eyed Tab, but the little girl of the farm saves Hazel.[30]
Tabitha Miggins Tabitha Miggins: Ship's Cat (On The PIll Ferry)
by
Mark Clinton Jones, writing as Philippa Perry
An elderly tabby cat, retired from her job as Colonial Companion, returns home and secures the most prestigious post of Ship's Cat on the Pill Ferry. Her hobbies include knitting, Milk Stout and having adventures on a magical island that doesn't really exist. Or does it?
Tabitha Twitchit The Tale of Tom Kitten
by
Beatrix Potter
The mother of three kittens Miss Moppet, Mittens and Tom Kitten, who tries hard to cope with their mischievous behaviour.
Tao The Incredible Journey
by
Sheila Burnford
A Siamese cat who accompanies Luath, a Labrador Retriever, and Bodger, a Bull Terrier, on a 300-mile journey through the Canadian wilderness to rejoin their human family.
Thistleclaw Bluestar's Prophecy
by
Erin Hunter
An ambitious grey tom living in ThunderClan. Tigerstar/claw's mentor.
Tim Tim the Travelling Cat [title unconfirmed] A cat tries to make it back to its owner in Britain during the War. Out of print.
Tobermory "Tobermory" (in The Chronicles of Clovis)
by
H. H. Munro
In a short story by Saki, a cat is taught to talk, but knows too many personal facts about people and is all too willing to talk about them.[31] He is taught by mild-mannered Cornelius Appin, who calls Tobermory "a Beyond-cat of extraordinary intelligence".[32] When Tobermory embarrasses everyone present by proving to be a consummate gossip, his owner attempts to poison him. Saki's biographer comments, "The cat eludes the strychnine left out for him and falls instead in combat with a big yellow tom from the rectory. Not a hero's death but an honorable one, and comedy depends heavily on a sense of honor."[33]
Thomas Gray Thomas Gray: Philosopher Cat
by
Philip J. Davis
A female cat living in Pembroke College, Cambridge. She assists a historian of science in his work.
Tom Kitten The Tale of Tom Kitten
by
Beatrix Potter
A curious but disobedient kitten in the children's stories "The Tale of Tom Kitten" and "The Roly Poly Pudding" by Beatrix Potter.
Trillion the Three-Headed Lion Beast Quest Trillion is a large, three-headed lion that cannot swim. He lives in the Central Plains. Tom, with the help of Tagus, defeats Trillion, and Tom goes through the Lion's Gate into Gorgonia, home of the wizard Malvel.
Tristram and Yseult "The Hart"
by
Greg Costikyan
These two cats belong to the narrator of a short fantasy story and are described fondly: "Tristram and Yseult twined about my legs, meowing, and holding their tails high; they got stew, too, and a bit of milk."[34]
Ungatt Trunn Lord Brocktree
by
Brian Jacques
An evil wildcat who conquers the mountain stronghold Salamandastron. But the good badger Brocktree comes to regain the mountain.
Velcro "A Gift Before Leaving"
by
W. R. Thompson
Velcro, over twenty years old, lives with Hannah in a futuristic, artificially intelligent house. Velcro finds that whenever he meows, the house delivers a full bowl of cat food, and he gains five pounds before Hannah finds out and reprograms the house.[35]

Unnamed[edit]

Character Earliest Appearance Notes
Black kitten who eats human flesh Cat's Eyes
by
Lee Jordan
A mild horror story in which a black kitten becomes an abnormally large black cat, who haunts the isolated house of the heroine, Rachel. In its kittenhood, it had led the other thirty cats of Old Miss Mulgrave to dine on her when she died in her home and the cats were starving. Rachel fears it is stalking her and her baby, with reason: "It was starving... Now it would eat anything."[36]
The Cat in the Picture "The Cat in the Picture"
by
Wright Morris
In this macabre tale originally published in a 1958 issue of Esquire, a black cat slowly displaces a retired Captain from his bed, his wife, and his home. The shocking ending is worthy of Alfred Hitchcock Presents. More than one commentator compared the writing with Poe's.[37][38][39]
Suzdal's super-cats "The Crime and the Glory of Commander Suzdal"
by
Cordwainer Smith
Commander Suzdal saves a colonial planet by imprinting a genetic message on cat cells, which instructs them to train themselves and to be ready to fight in the time of his need, then sends them back in time to a nearby moon. "A subjective second later, the cat-people save Suzdal" from an overwhelming alien attack.[40]
Various far-future cats "Puss In Boots"
by
Ronald Anthony Cross
This science fiction story describes a world full of far-future cats on a planet where "cats were the closest thing to a religion that they had" and where cats "wandered freely and slept wherever they chose. There were huge communal cat boxes everywhere...filled with some form of brightly colored pellets, which automatically emptied and were refilled with more of the same stuff." The fact that cats are no longer fed actual meat is a clue to the mystery in the story, about whether men are any longer real men.[41]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Nine Lives of Aristotle (book)". Kirkus Reviews. 71 (18): 1176. September 15, 2003. 
  2. ^ Roback, Diane; et al. (August 4, 2003). "The Nine Lives of Aristotle: Dick King-Smith, Author, Bob Graham, Illustrator". Publishers Weekly. 250 (31): 80. Retrieved November 10, 2014. 
  3. ^ LC Online Catalog (2003). "The Nine Lives of Aristotle". Library of Congress. ISBN 0-7636-2260-5. Retrieved November 10, 2014. Aristotle, a little white kitten, goes to live with a witch in an old cottage, where he finds so many opportunities for risky adventures that he soon has only one life left. 
  4. ^ Weisman, Kay (December 1, 2003). "The Nine Lives of Aristotle (Book)". Booklist. Chicago: American Library Association. 100 (7): 667. Retrieved November 10, 2014. 
  5. ^ Knight, Elaine E.; et al. (October 2003). "The Nine Lives of Aristotle (Book)". School Library Journal. Plain City, Ohio: Media Source. 49 (10): 128. Retrieved November 10, 2014. 
  6. ^ Association for Library Service to Children (2014). "Sam, Bangs & Moonshine, 1967 Medal Winner". Chicago: American Library Association. Retrieved November 10, 2014. 
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  38. ^ Barrett, Sharon (December 24, 1986). "Morris Collection Recalls Edgar Allan Poe Influence". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 24. A touch of the grotesque, which sometimes shades into horror, flavors many of the 26 stories in this collection. "The Cat in the Picture," first published in 1958, is the story of a man jealous of the attention his wife gives to a cat that decides to take up residence with them. The story, though lightened by irony, has a grim ending that seems less influenced by black humorists, in vogue at the time, than by Edgar Allan Poe. 
  39. ^ Pate, Nancy (August 16, 1992). "Moose Resurfaces to Review Cat Books". Orlando Sentinel. p. F8. Awful things happen to the featured felines in Susan Fromberg Schaeffer's "Chicago and the Cat," Wright Morris's "The Cat in the Picture" and Roald Dahl's 'Edward the Conqueror.' 
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