Solar power in Delaware

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Solar power in Delaware is small industry. Delaware had 97 MW of total installed capacity in 2016. The largest solar farms in the state included the 10 MW Dover Sun Park and the 12 MW Milford Solar Farm.[1]

In a 2012 study, a typical 5 kW system will pay for itself in five years, and go on to provide a savings of $37,837 over the balance of its 25-year life. It is estimated that 19% of all electricity use in Delaware can be provided by rooftop solar panels.[2] The state's renewable portfolio standard requires 0.4% from solar in 2012, 0.6% in 2013, 3.5% from solar by 2025, and 25% from renewable sources.[3]

Net metering is available for residential customers up to 25 kW and others from 100 kW to 2 MW depending on type of customer and the utility. Excess generation is credited at retail rate to next month's bill and optionally paid once a year at energy supply rate (normally referred to as "avoided cost"). Best practices recommend no limits, either individual or aggregate, and perpetual rollover of kilowatt credits, and not converting to a monetary value. Allowing optional payment once a year, either at avoided cost or retail, allows a mechanism of providing for the case where the system installed is larger than needed.[4]

Installed capacity[edit]

Delaware Photovoltaic Capacity (MWp)[5][6][7][8][9][10][1]
Year Capacity Installed % Change
2007 1.2 0.4 50%
2008 1.8 0.6 50%
2009 3.2 1.4 78%
2010 5.6 2.4 75%
2011 26.5 20.9 373%
2012 46.1 19.7 74%
2013 54 16.7 36%
2014 61 7 13%
2015 70 10 16%
2016 97 18 26%

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Delaware Solar". seia.org. Retrieved January 10, 2017. 
  2. ^ Witkin, Jim. "Report Argues for a Decentralized System of Renewable Power Generation". NYTimes.com. Retrieved January 10, 2017. 
  3. ^ Renewables Portfolio Standard
  4. ^ "Publications -" (PDF). irecusa.org. Retrieved January 10, 2017. 
  5. ^ Sherwood, Larry (August 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2011" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved August 16, 2012. 
  6. ^ Sherwood, Larry (June 2011). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2010" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved June 29, 2011. 
  7. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2010). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2009" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved July 28, 2010. 
  8. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2009). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2008" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved July 24, 2010. 
  9. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2012" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 16. Retrieved October 11, 2013. 
  10. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2014). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2013" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved September 26, 2014. 

External links[edit]