Solar power in North Carolina

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Solar power in North Carolina has been increasing rapidly, from less than 1 MW in 2007 to nearly 470 MW in 2013, and in 2015 had the fourth largest installed capacity of the US states.[1] Declining panel costs, a 30 percent federal grant known as a 1603 grant, available through December 31, 2011,[2] and a 30 percent tax credit available through 2016. The 30% credit is in addition to any local incentives, and pays for 30% of the cost of installation through a tax credit, which can be rolled over if less taxes are owed that year. The difference between a tax deduction and a tax credit is substantial, as a deduction depends on your tax rate to determine your savings, but a tax credit is directly available to repay the cost of installation.[3][4] A 2012 estimate indicates that a typical 5 kW solar array will pay for itself in 6 years, and thereafter generate a substantial profit.[5][6]

In addition to federal incentives, the state has a Renewable Portfolio Standard of 12.5% by 2021 and a state renewable energy tax credit, both of which have been credited with boosting solar installations.[7][8][9]

SunEdison has built a 17.2 megawatt solar farm in Davidson County.[10] Other prominent solar contractors in North Carolina include Strata Solar, Baker Renewable Energy and FLS Energy.[11]

Source: NREL[12]

Generation[edit]

Using data mined from US Energy Information Agency Electric Power Annual 2013[13] and Electric Power Monthly Data Browser [14][15][16][17] the following table summarizes North Carolina’s solar energy posture.

Capacity factor for each year was computed from the yearly average summer capacity.

Solar Electric Generation in North Carolina
Year Facilities Summer Capacity (MW) Electric energy (GWh or M kWh) Capacity factor Yearly growth of Generating Capacity Yearly growth of produced Energy % of NC renewable electric energy % of NC generated electric energy % of US Solar electric energy
2014 595.9 922 0.227 78.8% 167.3% 10.86% 0.72% 5.03%
2013 84 333.2 345 0.176 190.8% 148.2% 3.5% 0.27% 3.82%
2012 38 114.6 139 0.199 156.4% 717.7% 2.16% 0.12% 3.21%
2011 15 44.7 17 0.049 27.7% 54.6% 0.27% 0.01% 0.94%
2010 9 35 11 0.066 1067% 120% 0.16% 0.01% 0.91%
2009 3 3 5 0.190 0% 150% 0.07% 0.00% 0.56%
2008 3 3 2 0.152 0% 0% 0.04% 0.00% 0.23%
2007 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%


NC Solar Electric Generation Profile 2014

[19]

NC Solar Generation (GWh, Million kWh)[18]
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Total
2011 17
2012 2 2 4 6 6 6 9 7 9 17 23 48 139
2013 10 17 24 21 32 34 34 32 36 40 30 35 345
2014 39 43 68 81 90 103 93 92 99 84 71 58 922

2014 Duke Energy initiative[edit]

On September 15, 2014 Duke Energy committed $500 million to an expansion of solar power in North Carolina.[20]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.solarpowerworldonline.com/2015/02/north-carolina-ranks-fourth-in-the-u-s-for-installed-capacity/
  2. ^ 1603 Treasury Program
  3. ^ US Federal Incentives for Solar, Wind, Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency
  4. ^ The Federal Solar Tax Credit
  5. ^ North Carolina
  6. ^ Levelized Cost of Solar Photovoltaics in North Carolina
  7. ^ Lauren Shwisberg (February 27, 2014). "Utility Scale Solar Energy: North Carolina's Emergent Success". The Energy Collective. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  8. ^ Daniel Gross (July 5, 2014). "NC quietly becomes a star on solar energy stage". The News & Observer. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  9. ^ Steve DeVane (July 18, 2014). "Solar farms taking root in North Carolina". The Fayetteville Observer. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  10. ^ Duke Energy and SunEdison Announce Completion of 17.2MW Solar Farm
  11. ^ Solar Power World
  12. ^ "PV Watts". NREL. Retrieved 17 May 2012. 
  13. ^ "Electric Power Annual State Data"[1] 1990-2013 Existing Name Plate and Summer Capacity by Energy Source and State retrieved 2015-6-1
  14. ^ "Electric Power Monthly Data Browser "[2] Report 1.20 retrieved 2015-6-1
  15. ^ "Electric Power Monthly Data Browser "[3] Report 1.14 retrieved 2015-6-1
  16. ^ "Electric Power Monthly Data Browser "[4] Report 1.13 retrieved 2015-6-1
  17. ^ "Electric Power Monthly Data Browser "[5] Report 1.6 retrieved 2015-6-1
  18. ^ "Energy Information Administration (EIA)"[6] Table 1.20 Net Generation from Solar by state by sector retrieved 2015-5-23
  19. ^ "Energy Information Administration (EIA)"[7] Table 1.20 Net Generation from Solar by state by sector retrieved 2015-5-23
  20. ^ "Duke Energy commits $500 million to North Carolina solar power expansion". Duke Energy. Retrieved December 11, 2014.