Solar power in North Carolina

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Solar power in North Carolina has been increasing rapidly, from less than 1 MW in 2007 to nearly 470 MW in 2013, and in 2015 had the fourth largest installed capacity of the US states.[1] Declining panel costs, a 30 percent federal grant known as a 1603 grant, available through December 31, 2011,[2] and a 30 percent tax credit available through 2019, declining to 10% by 2022.[3] The federal tax credit is in addition to any local incentives, and pays for the cost of installation, which can be rolled over if less taxes are owed that year. The difference between a tax deduction and a tax credit is substantial, as a deduction depends on your tax rate to determine your savings, but a tax credit is directly available to repay the cost of installation.[4][5] A 2012 estimate indicates that a typical 5 kW solar array will pay for itself in 6 years, and thereafter generate a substantial profit.[6][7]

In addition to federal incentives, the state has a Renewable Portfolio Standard of 12.5% by 2021 and a state renewable energy tax credit, both of which have been credited with boosting solar installations.[8][9][10]

SunEdison has built a 17.2 megawatt solar farm in Davidson County.[11] Other prominent solar contractors in North Carolina include Strata Solar, Baker Renewable Energy and FLS Energy.[12]

Installed photovoltaics[13][14][15][16][17][18]
Year Total (MW) Installed (MW) % Change
2007 0.7
2008 4.7 4 571%
2009 12.5 7.8 166%
2010 40.0 28.7 220%
2011 85.5 45.5 114%
2012 207.9 122.4 143%
2013 469.0 261.1 126%
Source: NREL[19]

Currently Operating[edit]

Duke Energy Renewables
Name Location MW Construction
Completed
PV Modules Homes
Powered
Electricity
Purchaser
Bethel Price Solar[20] Pitt County 5 2013 23,000 1000 Dominion North Carolina Power
Dogwood Solar[21] Halifax County 20 December 2013 93,000
Halifax Solar Power Project[22] Roanoke Rapids 20 December 2014 3,500 Dominion North Carolina Power
Holiness Solar[23] Murphy 1 November 2011 4,242 200 Tennessee Valley Authority
Martins Creek Solar[24] Murphy 1 4,400 150 Tennessee Valley Authority
Millfield Solar[25] Beaufort County 5 November 2013 27,450 1,000 North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency
Murfreesboro Solar[26] Murfreesboro 5 December 2011 19,960 700 North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation
Shelby Solar[27] Shelby 1 May 2010 4,522 140 North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency
Taylorsville Solar[28] Taylorsville 1 October 2010 4,224 150 EnergyUnited
Washington Airport Solar[29] Beaufort County 5 December 2013 23,000 1000 North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency
Washington White Post Solar[30] Beaufort County 12.5 December 2012 53,000 3,000 North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency
Wingate Solar[31] Murphy 1 August 2011 4,340 200 Tennessee Valley Authority
Windsor Cooper Hill Solar[32] Bertie County 5 2013 23,000 1000 Dominion North Carolina Power
Duke Energy Solar Distributed Generation Program[33]
Name Location Physical Size (ft2) # of Solar Panels System Size (kW) Annual Generation (kWh) Date Commissioned
Carrier Center 900 Center Park Dr.
Charlotte, NC 28217
63,370 2,296 528.08 695,007 Nov. 3, 2010
Childress Klein Properties 6935 Reames Road
Charlotte, NC 28216
63,864 2,314 532 Jan. 29, 2010
Childress Klein
Old Dowd Road
10240 Old Dowd Road
Charlotte, NC 28208
260,544 9,440 2,171.2 2,860,546 Oct. 15, 2010
City of Charlotte 4411 Northpointe Industrial Blvd.
Charlotte, NC 28216
13,524 490 112.7 148,325 Aug. 19, 2010
EPA – Learning Center 109 T.W. Alexander Dr
Durham, NC 27711
13,140 476 109.5 April 1, 2010
Food Lion 2085 Harrison Road
Salisbury, NC 28147
130,800 4,746 1,090 May 4, 2010
Freightliner 11550 Statesville Blvd
Cleveland, NC 27013
43,056 1,612 358.8 514,743 Dec. 29, 2010
Gaston County Schools 500 Reid Street
Lowell, NC 28098
8,501 308 70.84 93,233 May 7, 2010
Highwoods Properties 2085 Brigham Road
Greensboro, NC 27409
179,400 6,500 1,495 April 1, 2010
Kimberly-Clark 32 Smyth Ave
Hendersonville, NC 28792
9,960 361 83 120,404 Oct. 27, 2010
Liberty Hardware 390 Business Park Drive
Winston-Salem, NC 27107
37,481 1,358 312.34 406,833 Sept. 1, 2010
Lincoln Charter School 7876 Galway Ln
Denver, NC 28037
19,320 700 161 211,892 Aug. 13, 2010
Maple View Agricultural Center 3501 Dairyland Rd
Hillsborough, NC 27278
21,638 784 180.32 259,270 Sept. 1, 2010
Marshall Steam Station 8320 East Hwy 150
Terrell, NC 28682
114,000 3,535 950 1,557,171 Dec. 15, 2010
McAlpine Residential[n 1] Southeast Charlotte 276 10 2.3 3,000 November and December 2010
McAlpine Ground-Mount 7210 Pineville-Matthews Road
Pineville, NC 28226
6,000 218 50 71,892 2009-2010
National Gypsum 1725 Drywall Drive
Mount Holly, NC 28120
144,960 5,252 1,208 Feb. 2, 2010
Siemens 5101 Westinghouse Blvd
Charlotte, NC 28273
6,569 238 54.74 74,077 Oct. 20, 2010
Thomas Built Buses 1408 Courtesy Rd
High Point, NC 27260
46,632 1,689 388.6 557,878 Dec. 15, 2010
  1. ^ All stats listed for "McAlpine Residential" are per home.

Under Construction[edit]

Duke Energy Renewables
Name Size Acreage Lease Term Annual output # of panels In-service date Location
Camp Lejeune Facility[34] 13 MW AC
17 MW DC
80 25 years 27,000 MWh 55,000 By fourth quarter 2015 Camp Lejeune
(Onslow County)
Elm City Facility[35] 40 MW AC
53.6 MW DC
450 25 years 82,000 MWh 500,000 By fourth quarter 2015 4579-4699 Haynes Rd.
Elm City, N.C.
(Wilson County)
Fayetteville Facility[36] 23 MW AC
32.1 MW DC
120 25 years 48,000 MWh 105,000 By fourth quarter 2015 22828 NC 87
Fayetteville, N.C.
(Bladen County)
Warsaw Facility[37] 64.8 MW AC
87.5 MW DC
500 25 years 133,000 MWh 850,000 By fourth quarter 2015 Penny Branch Rd.
Warsaw, N.C.
(Duplin County)
Ecoplexus[38]
Location Purchaser Operational MW
Bradley Dominion North Carolina Power / Duke Energy Late 2015
Little River Dominion North Carolina Power / Duke Energy Late 2015
Old Catawba Dominion North Carolina Power / Duke Energy Late 2015
Ouchchy Dominion North Carolina Power / Duke Energy Late 2015
Thornton Dominion North Carolina Power / Duke Energy Late 2015
Total 28MW

Generation[edit]

Using data mined from US Energy Information Agency Electric Power Annual 2014[39] and Electric Power Monthly Data Browser [40][41][42][43] the following table summarizes North Carolina’s solar energy posture.

Capacity factor for each year was computed from the end of year summer capacity for 2014/2015 and is low. 2015 data is from Electric Power Monthly and is subject to change.

Solar Electric Generation in North Carolina
Year Facilities Summer Capacity (MW) Electric energy (GWh or M kWh) Capacity factor Yearly growth of Generating Capacity Yearly growth of produced Energy % of NC renewable electric energy % of NC generated electric energy % of US Solar electric energy
2015 262 1396.5 1835 0.150 107% 152% 20% 1.4% 6.9%
2014 676 729 0.123 103% 111% 9.10% 0.60% 4.10%
2013 84 333.2 345 0.176 190.8% 148.2% 3.5% 0.27% 3.82%
2012 38 114.6 139 0.199 156.4% 717.7% 2.16% 0.12% 3.21%
2011 15 44.7 17 0.049 27.7% 54.6% 0.27% 0.01% 0.94%
2010 9 35 11 0.066 1067% 120% 0.16% 0.01% 0.91%
2009 3 3 5 0.190 0% 150% 0.07% 0.00% 0.56%
2008 3 3 2 0.152 0% 0% 0.04% 0.00% 0.23%
2007 0 0 0 0 0% 0% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%
2015 Monthly Solar Generation for NC[45]
2014 Monthly Solar Generation for NC[46]
NC Solar Generation (GWh, Million kWh)[44]
Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Total
2011 17
2012 2 2 4 6 6 6 9 7 9 17 23 48 139
2013 10 17 24 21 32 34 34 32 36 40 30 35 345
2014 31 41 56 58 74 67 69 75 68 88 49 54 729
2015 76 101 140 163 169 177 182 199 168 150 149 161 1835
2016 169 169

Beginning with the 2014 data year, Energy Information Administration will estimate distributed solar photovoltaic generation and distributed solar photovoltaic capacity.[47] These non-utility scale estimates project that, in 2014 North Carolina, generated [48] a further 72 GWh and in 2015 an additional 90 GWh of solar electricity from such distributed PV systems.

2014 Duke Energy initiative[edit]

On September 15, 2014 Duke Energy committed $500 million to an expansion of solar power in North Carolina.[49]

2015 Completions & Future[edit]

On September 9, 2015, Duke Energy Renewables announced the completion of four solar farms with combined output totaling 30 MW, in addition to three other farms under construction. The three farms under construction, once completed will have an output totaling 132 MW.[50]

Completed Projects[edit]

Under Construction[edit]

As of September 9, 2015[53]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.solarpowerworldonline.com/2015/02/north-carolina-ranks-fourth-in-the-u-s-for-installed-capacity/
  2. ^ 1603 Treasury Program
  3. ^ Wind, Solar Companies Get Boost From Tax-Credit Extension
  4. ^ US Federal Incentives for Solar, Wind, Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency
  5. ^ The Federal Solar Tax Credit
  6. ^ North Carolina
  7. ^ Levelized Cost of Solar Photovoltaics in North Carolina
  8. ^ Lauren Shwisberg (February 27, 2014). "Utility Scale Solar Energy: North Carolina's Emergent Success". The Energy Collective. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  9. ^ Daniel Gross (July 5, 2014). "NC quietly becomes a star on solar energy stage". The News & Observer. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  10. ^ Steve DeVane (July 18, 2014). "Solar farms taking root in North Carolina". The Fayetteville Observer. Retrieved 2014-09-05. 
  11. ^ Duke Energy and SunEdison Announce Completion of 17.2MW Solar Farm
  12. ^ Solar Power World
  13. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2014). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2013" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2014-07-28. 
  14. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2013). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2012" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 16. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  15. ^ Sherwood, Larry (August 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2011" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 17. Retrieved 2012-08-16. 
  16. ^ Sherwood, Larry (June 2011). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2010" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2011-06-29. 
  17. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2010). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2009" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2010-07-28. 
  18. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2009). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2008" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2010-07-24. 
  19. ^ "PV Watts". NREL. Retrieved 17 May 2012. 
  20. ^ "Bethel Price Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 10, 2015. 
  21. ^ "Dogwood Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 11, 2015. 
  22. ^ "Duke Energy acquires Halifax Solar Project in Eastern North Carolina". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 11, 2015. 
  23. ^ "Holiness Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 11, 2015. 
  24. ^ "Martins Creek Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 11, 2015. 
  25. ^ "Millfield Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 11, 2015. 
  26. ^ "Murfreesboro Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 11, 2015. 
  27. ^ "Shelby Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 11, 2015. 
  28. ^ "Taylorsville Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 11, 2015. 
  29. ^ "Washington Airport Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 11, 2015. 
  30. ^ "Washington White Post Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 10, 2015. 
  31. ^ "Wingate Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 10, 2015. 
  32. ^ "Windsor Cooper Hill Solar Project Highlights". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 10, 2015. 
  33. ^ "North Carolina Solar Distributed Generation". duke-energy.com. Retrieved January 30, 2016. 
  34. ^ "Camp Lejeune Facility Characteristics" (PDF). duke-energy.com. Retrieved November 4, 2015. 
  35. ^ "Elm City Facility Characteristics" (PDF). duke-energy.com. Retrieved November 4, 2015. 
  36. ^ "Fayetteville Facility Characteristics" (PDF). duke-energy.com. Retrieved November 4, 2015. 
  37. ^ "Warsaw Facility Characteristics" (PDF). duke-energy.com. Retrieved November 4, 2015. 
  38. ^ "Ecoplexus adds 28MWs of solar in North Carolina". ecoplexus.com. Retrieved November 10, 2015. 
  39. ^ "Electric Power Annual State Data"[1] 1990-2014 Existing Name Plate and Summer Capacity by Energy Source and State retrieved 2016-3-12
  40. ^ "Electric Power Monthly Data Browser "[2] Report 1.20 retrieved 2016-3-12
  41. ^ "Electric Power Monthly Data Browser "[3] Report 1.14 retrieved 2016-3-12
  42. ^ "Electric Power Monthly Data Browser "[4] Report 1.13 retrieved 2016-3-12
  43. ^ "Electric Power Monthly Data Browser "[5] Report 1.6 retrieved 2016-3-12
  44. ^ "Energy Information Administration (EIA)"[6] Table 1.20 Net Generation from Solar by state by sector retrieved 2015-5-23
  45. ^ "Electric Power Monthly" [7] retrieved 2016-3-10
  46. ^ "Electric Power Monthly" [8] retrieved 2016-3-10
  47. ^ “Electric Power Annual”[9] retrieved 2016 3 12
  48. ^ “Electric Power Monthly”[10] retrieved 2016 3 12
  49. ^ "Duke Energy commits $500 million to North Carolina solar power expansion". Duke Energy. Retrieved December 11, 2014. 
  50. ^ "Duke Energy unit completes 4 N.C. solar farms". Charlotte Observer. Retrieved September 9, 2015. 
  51. ^ "Dominion North Carolina Power in spat with solar farm over purchase agreement". Triangle Business Journal. Retrieved September 9, 2015. 
  52. ^ "Cresswell Solar Project". Tradewind Energy. Retrieved September 9, 2015. 
  53. ^ "Duke Energy Renewables more than doubles its North Carolina solar portfolio". duke-energy.com. Retrieved September 11, 2015.