Bhili language

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Bhili
भीली
Native to India
Region Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, Rajasthan, Maharashtra
Native speakers
3.5 million (2001)[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3 Variously:
bhb – Bhili (Bhagoria, Bhilboli, Patelia)
gas – Adiwasi Garasia
gra – Rajput Garasia (Dungri)
Glottolog bhil1251  (Bhili)[2]
rajp1235  (Rajput Garasia)[3]
adiw1235  (Adiwasi Garasia)[4]
Bhili-speaking area in India

Bhili is a Western Indo-Aryan language spoken in west-central India, in the region east of Ahmedabad. Other names for the language include Bhagoria and Bhilboli; several varieties are called Garasia. Bhili is a member of the Bhil language family, which is related to Gujarati and the Rajasthani language. The language is written using a variation of the Devanagari script.

Nahali (Kalto) and Khandeshi are the major dialects of Bhili language. The term Bhili is of Dravidian origin "Vil" which means bow, refers to the Bow people.

Further reading[edit]

  • Bodhankar, Anantrao. Bhillori (Bhilli) – English Dictionary. Pune: Tribal Research & Training Institute, 2002.[[[Wikipedia:Cleanup|not Bhilori language?]]]
  • Jungblut, L. A Short Bhili Grammar of Jhabua State and Adjoining Territories. S.l: s.n, 1937.
  • Thompson, Charles S. Rudiments of the Bhili Language. Ahmedabad [India]: United Printing Press, 1895.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bhili (Bhagoria, Bhilboli, Patelia) at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Adiwasi Garasia at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Rajput Garasia (Dungri) at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Bhili". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  3. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Rajput Garasia". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  4. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Adiwasi Garasia". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 

External links[edit]