Central Suffolk and North Ipswich (UK Parliament constituency)

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Central Suffolk and North Ipswich
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Central Suffolk and North Ipswich in Suffolk.
Outline map
Location of Suffolk within England.
County Suffolk
Population 98,935 (2011 census)[1]
Electorate 76,177 (December 2010)[2]
Current constituency
Created 1997
Member of parliament Daniel Poulter (Conservative)
Number of members One
Created from Central Suffolk
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency East of England

Central Suffolk and North Ipswich is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Daniel Poulter of the Conservative Party.[n 2]

History[edit]

Sir Michael Lord, knighted in 2001, was the first MP who served the seat, from 1997 until 2010. The 2010 general election saw the fourth win for a Conservative with the election of Daniel Poulter.

Boundaries[edit]

1997-2010: The District of Mid Suffolk wards of Barham, Barking, Bramford, Claydon, Creeting, Debenham, Eye, Fressingfield, Helmingham, Hoxne, Mendlesham, Palgrave, Stonham, Stradbroke, Wetheringsett, Weybread, and Worlingworth, the District of Suffolk Coastal wards of Bealings, Dennington, Earl Soham, Framlingham, Glemham, Grundisburgh and Witnesham, Hasketon, Kesgrave, Otley, Rushmere, and Wickham Market, and the Borough of Ipswich wards of Broom Hill, Castle Hill, Whitehouse, and Whitton.

2010-present: The District of Mid Suffolk wards of Barking and Somersham, Bramford and Blakenham, Claydon and Barham, Debenham, Eye, Fressingfield, Helmingham and Coddenham, Hoxne, Mendlesham, Palgrave, Stradbroke and Laxfield, The Stonhams, Wetheringsett, and Worlingworth, the District of Suffolk Coastal wards of Earl Soham, Framlingham, Grundisburgh, Hacheston, Kesgrave East, Kesgrave West, Otley, Rushmere St Andrew, Wickham Market, and Witnesham, and the Borough of Ipswich wards of Castle Hill, Whitehouse, and Whitton.

Constituency profile[edit]

Central Suffolk and North Ipswich is a Conservative safe seat, primarily made up of rural farming communities and retirement properties. The exception to this are the three wards from Ipswich Borough Council, which polarise support between the Conservatives and Labour, and Kesgrave, a new satellite town, which shows strong support for the Conservatives. The rural areas which make up the majority of the constituency, consistently return a majority of Conservative councillors. The local government make up of the seat, in respect of the number of borough and district councillors elected by party is 28 Conservative, 5 Labour, 4 Independent, 3 Liberal Democrat, and 1 Green.

Members of Parliament[edit]

Election Member[3] Party
1997 Sir Michael Lord Conservative
2010 Daniel Poulter Conservative

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2015: Central Suffolk and North Ipswich[4][5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Daniel Poulter 30,317 56.1 +5.3
Labour Jack Abbott 10,173 18.8 +2.6
UKIP Mark Cole 7,459 13.8 +9.4
Liberal Democrat Jon Neal 3,314 6.1 −18.8
Green Rhodri Griffiths 2,664 4.9 +2.2
English Democrats Tony Holyoak 162 0.3 N/A
Majority 20,144 37.2 +11.4
Turnout 54,089 68.7 −1.7
Conservative hold Swing +1.4
General Election 2010: Central Suffolk and North Ipswich[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Daniel Poulter 27,125 50.8 +6.2
Liberal Democrat Andrew Aalders-Dunthorne 13,339 25.0 +4.7
Labour Bhavna Joshi 8,636 16.2 −12.3
UKIP Roy Philpott 2,361 4.4 +0.9
Green Andrew Stringer 1,452 2.7 −0.6
Independent Mark Trevitt 389 0.7 N/A
New Party Richard Vass 118 0.2 N/A
Majority 13,786 25.8 +10.4
Turnout 53,420 70.4 +3.4
Conservative hold Swing +0.8

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General Election 2005: Central Suffolk and North Ipswich[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Lord 22,333 43.9 −0.5
Labour Neil Macdonald 14,477 28.5 −8.6
Liberal Democrat Andrew Houseley 10,709 21.1 +5.0
UKIP John West 1,754 3.4 +1.0
Green Martin Wolfe 1,593 3.1 N/A
Majority 7,856 15.4 +8.1
Turnout 50,866 66.7 +3.2
Conservative hold Swing +4.1
General Election 2001: Central Suffolk and North Ipswich[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Lord 20,924 44.4 +1.8
Labour Miss Carol Elizabeth Jones 17,455 37.1 +1.2
Liberal Democrat Mrs. Ann Margaret Elvin 7,593 16.1 −4.5
UKIP Jonathan Peter Wright 1,132 2.4 N/A
Majority 3,469 7.3 +0.6
Turnout 47,104 63.5 −11.5
Conservative hold Swing +0.3

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General Election 1997: Central Suffolk and North Ipswich[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael Lord 22,493 42.6 N/A
Labour Miss Carol Elizabeth Jones 18,955 35.9 N/A
Liberal Democrat Dr. Minone Hermione Goldspink 10,886 20.6 N/A
Independent Conservative Mrs. Stephanie A. Bennell 489 0.9 N/A
Majority 3,538 6.7 N/A
Turnout 52,823 75.0 N/A
Conservative win (new seat)

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
References
  1. ^ "Central Suffolk and North Ipswich: Usual Resident Population, 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 20 February 2015. 
  2. ^ "Electorate Figures - Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Retrieved 13 March 2011. 
  3. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "S" (part 6)[self-published source][better source needed]
  4. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  5. ^ "2015 Election Results". BBC News. 
  6. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  7. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  8. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  9. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 52°12′N 1°09′E / 52.2°N 1.15°E / 52.2; 1.15