FC Barcelona in European football

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FC Barcelona in European football
Close-up of a long-haired young man, wearing a football shirt with blue and red vertical stripes
Lionel Messi is the highest goal scorer for Barcelona.
Club FC Barcelona
First entry 1955–58 Inter-Cities Fairs Cup
Latest entry 2017–18 UEFA Champions League
Titles
Champions League
Cup Winners' Cup
Super Cup
FIFA Club World Cup

FC Barcelona, also known simply as Barcelona and familiarly as Barça, is a Spanish professional football club based in Barcelona. The club first participated in a European competition in 1910, and from 1955 onwards spent every season in one or more European competitions. The first international cup they took part in was the Pyrenees Cup. The competition lasted from 1910 to 1914 and Barcelona won four out of five editions. From 1914 to the beginning of the Latin Cup in 1949, Barcelona did not participate in any international competitions. From the 1955–56 season, with the exception of the 1956–57 (during the first Fairs Cup, because a Vienna XI withdrew from the competition), they are the only team to have played in the European cups every year until today.

Barcelona has won the now defunct UEFA Cup Winners' Cup four times and the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup three times, which is more than any other club for both trophies.[1][2] They also took part in the Latin Cup twice as champions of Spain, winning on both occasions, a record shared with Real Madrid and Milan. Though they did not manage to win the European Cup, now the UEFA Champions League, during the early years of the competition, they have since won the trophy five times, with their first win in 1992.[3]

Barcelona have moved to the second place of the ranking of Europe’s most successful clubs in terms of international trophies won, just behind Real Madrid. In the second part of 2015, with the UEFA Super Cup victory in Tbilisi against Sevilla and the FIFA Club World Cup victory in Yokohama against River Plate meant the Catalans have won 20 different titles, behind Real Madrid's 24. In the tables, "(H)" denotes home ground, "(A)" denotes away ground and "(N)" symbolises neutral ground. The first score is always Barcelona's.

Overall record[edit]

As of 27 September 2017.[4][5][6][7][8][9] Legend: GF = Goals For. GA = Goals Against. GD = Goal Difference.
Competition Played Won Drew Lost GF GA GD Win%
European Cup / Champions League 281 164 63 54 562 275 +287 058.36
Cup Winners' Cup 85 50 18 17 178 87 +91 058.82
UEFA Cup / UEFA Europa League 78 40 17 21 149 75 +74 051.28
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup 71 36 17 18 143 86 +57 050.70
UEFA Super Cup 14 6 4 4 17 17 +0 042.86
FIFA Club World Cup 5 3 0 2 10 4 +6 060.00
Intercontinental Cup 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 000.00
Total 536 301 119 116 1,068 545 +523 056.16
Historical progression by competition
1 Group stage. Highest-ranked eliminated team in case of qualification, lowest-ranked qualified team in case of elimination.
Intercontinental Cup / FIFA Club World Cup
Edition Preliminary stages Semifinals Final / 3rd pos.
1992 Brazil São Paulo
2006 Mexico América Brazil Internacional
2009 Mexico Atlante Argentina Estudiantes La Plata
2011 Qatar Al-Sadd Brazil Santos
2015 China Evergrande Argentina River Plate
UEFA Super Cup
Edition Final
1979 England Forest
1982 England Villa
1989 Italy Milan
1992 Germany W. Bremen
1997 Germany Dortmund
2006 Spain Sevilla
2009 Ukraine Shakhtar
2011 Portugal Porto
2015 Spain Sevilla
European Cup / UEFA Champions League
Season Preliminary stages Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
1959–60 Bulgaria CSKA Sofia Italy Milan England Wolverhampton Spain R. Madrid
1960–61 Belgium Lierse Spain R. Madrid Czechoslovakia Hradec Králové West Germany Hamburg Portugal Benfica
1974–75 Austria VÖEST Linz Netherlands Feyenoord Sweden Åtvidaberg England Leeds
1985–86 Czechoslovakia Sparta Prague Portugal Porto Italy Juventus Sweden Göteborg Romania Steaua
1991–92 East Germany Hansa West Germany Kaiserslautern Czechoslovakia Sparta Prague 1 Not played Italy Sampdoria
1992–93 Norway Viking Russia CSKA Moscow
1993–94 Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv Austria Austria Wien Russia Spartak Moscow 1 Portugal Porto Italy Milan
1994–95 England Man. United 1 France PSG
1997–98 Latvia Skonto Riga Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 1
1998–99 England Man. United 1
1999–2000 England Arsenal 1 Czech Republic Sparta Prague 1 England Chelsea Spain Valencia
2000–01 England Leeds 1
2001–02 Poland Wisla France O. Lyon 1 Italy Roma 1 Greece Panathinaikos Spain R. Madrid
2002–03 Poland Legia Belgium Club Brugge 1 England Newcastle 1 Italy Juventus
2004–05 Ukraine Shakhtar 1 England Chelsea
2005–06 Italy Udinese 1 England Chelsea Portugal Benfica Italy Milan England Arsenal
2006–07 Germany W. Bremen 1 England Liverpool
2007–08 Scotland Rangers 1 Scotland Celtic Germany Schalke England Man. United
2008–09 Poland Wisła Ukraine Shakhtar 1 France O. Lyon Germany Bayern England Chelsea England Man. United
2009–10 Russia Rubin 1 Germany Stuttgart England Arsenal Italy Inter Milan
2010–11 Russia Rubin 1 England Arsenal Ukraine Shakhtar Spain R. Madrid England Man. United
2011–12 Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň 1 Germany Leverkusen Italy Milan England Chelsea
2012–13 Portugal Benfica 1 Italy Milan France PSG Germany Bayern
2013–14 Netherlands Ajax 1 England Man. City Spain Atlético
2014–15 Netherlands Ajax 1 England Man. City France PSG Germany Bayern Italy Juventus
2015–16 Germany Leverkusen 1 England Arsenal Spain Atlético
2016–17 Germany Borussia M. 1 France PSG Italy Juventus
UEFA Cup Winners' Cup
Season Preliminary stages Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarter-finals Semifinals Final
1963–64 Republic of Ireland Shelbourne West Germany Hamburg
1968–69 Switzerland Lugano Bye Norway Lyn Oslo West Germany Köln Czechoslovakia Slovan B.
1971–72 Northern Ireland Distillery Romania Steaua
1978–79 Soviet Union Shakhtar Belgium Anderlecht England Ipswich Belgium Beveren West Germany Fortuna
1979–80 Iceland ÍA Luxembourg Aris Spain Valencia
1981–82 Bulgaria Botev Czechoslovakia Dukla East Germany Lokomotive England Tottenham Belgium Standard
1982–83 Cyprus Apollon Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Crvena Zvezda Austria Austria Wien
1983-84 East Germany Magdeburg Netherlands NEC England Man. United
1984-85 France Metz
1988-89 Iceland Fram Poland Lech Denmark Aarhus Bulgaria CSKA Sofia Italy Sampdoria
1989–90 Poland Legia Belgium Anderlecht
1990–91 Turkey Trabzonspor Iceland Fram Soviet Union Dynamo Kyiv Italy Juventus England Man. United
1996–97 Cyprus AEK Serbia and Montenegro Crvena Zvezda Sweden AIK Italy Fiorentina France PSG
Inter-Cities Fairs Cup / UEFA Cup / UEFA Europa League
Season Preliminary stages Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
1955-58 Denmark Stævnet England Birmingham England London XI
1958-60 Switzerland Basel XI Italy Inter Milan Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Belgrade XI England Birmingham
1960-61 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Zagreb XI Scotland Hibernian
1961-62 West Germany West Berlin XI Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia D. Zagreb England Wednesday Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Crvena Zvezda Spain Valencia
1962-63 Portugal Belenenses Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Crvena Zvezda
1964-65 Italy Fiorentina Scotland Celtic France Strasbourg
1965-66 Netherlands Utrecht Belgium Antwerp West Germany Hannover Spain Espanyol England Chelsea Spain Zaragoza
1966-67 Scotland Dundee U.
1967-68 Switzerland Zürich
1969–70 Denmark B 1913 Hungary Győr Italy Inter Milan
1970–71 Poland Katowice Italy Juventus
1972–73 Portugal Porto
1973–74 France Nice
1975–76 Greece PAOK Italy Lazio Hungary Vasas Bulgaria Levski Sofia England Liverpool
1976–77 Portugal Belenenses Belgium Lokeren Sweden Öster Spain Athletic Bilbao
1977–78 Romania Steaua Netherlands AZ England Ipswich England Villa Netherlands PSV
1980-81 Malta Sliema West Germany Köln
1986-87 Albania Flamurtari Portugal Sporting Lisbon West Germany Uerdingen Scotland Dundee U.
1987-88 Portugal Belenenses Soviet Union Dynamo Moscow Albania Flamurtari West Germany Leverkusen
1995–96 Israel Hapoel Be’er Sheva Portugal Vitória Guimarães Spain Sevilla Netherlands PSV Germany Bayern
2000–01 Belgium Club Brugge Greece AEK Spain Celta England Liverpool
2003–04 Slovakia Púchov Greece Panionios Denmark Brøndby Scotland Celtic

Pyrenees Cup[edit]

FC Barcelona's 1910 squad, victors in the inaugural Pyrenees Cup.

Barcelona began to play friendly games against teams from the neighbouring regions in France in 1904. Club president Arthur Witty organised the club's first trip abroad, which resulted in their first game against a non-Spanish team. On 1 May 1904, Barcelona defeated the French team Stade Olympien des Étudiants Toulousains.[10]

By 1910, the international friendlies evolved into the Pyrenees Cup, a competition featuring teams from Languedoc, Le Midi, Aquitaine, Catalonia, and the Basque Country. At that time it was considered the finest competition open for participation.[11][12] Five editions were played in total, with FC Barcelona winning four consecutive trophies from 1910 to 1913.[13]

Year Opposing team Score City
1910 Spain Real Sociedad 2–1 Sète, France
1911 France Gars de Bordeaux 4–0 Toulouse, France
1912 France Stade Bordelais UC 5–3 Toulouse, France
1913 France Comète Simot 7–2 Barcelona, Spain

Latin Cup[edit]

In 1949, the football federations of Spain, Italy, France, and Portugal, came together and launched their own club competition, the Latin Cup, which was staged at the end of every season in a single host country.[14] The competition featured two semi-finals, a third place play-off and a final. As La Liga champions in 1949, Barça represented Spain in the inaugural competition. They beat Reims 5–0 in their semi-final at Les Corts, before beating Sporting Lisbon 2–1 in the final at the Estadio Chamartín. Barça also played in and won the 1952 competition in Paris, beating Juventus 4–2 in the semi-final and then Nice 1–0 in the final.[14] After the introduction of the European Cup, the Latin Cup was discontinued and nowadays it is not recognised by UEFA.[14]

Year Round Opposing team Score
1949 Semi-final France Stade de Reims 5–3 (H)
Final Portugal Sporting CP 2–1 (N)
1952 Semi-final Italy Juventus 4–2 (N)
Final France Nice 1–0 (N)

European Cup / UEFA Champions League[edit]

Barcelona vs. Hamburg, 1961
Barcelona against Hamburg in 1961
Ronald Koeman's boots from the 1992 European Cup Final
Ronald Koeman's boots from the 1992 European Cup Final, an exhibit at the FC Barcelona Museum
Andrés Iniesta
Andrés Iniesta against Rubin Kazan in the 2009–10 Champions League
Barcelona vs. Bayer Leverkusen, 2012
FCB against Bayer Leverkusen in 2012
Barcelona vs. Bayern Munich, 2013
Barça against Bayern Munich in 2013

The European Cup was inaugurated in 1955, with Barcelona's arch-rivals Real Madrid winning the first five editions.[15] In 1959, Barcelona entered this competition for the first time, after winning the 1958–59 La Liga season. Until the 1990s, the club had little success, apart from their runner-up places in 1961 and 1986. In 1992, Johan Cruyff's Dream Team[16] won their first European Cup with a 1–0 win against Sampdoria. Since then, Barcelona has won the competition four additional times, in 2006, 2009, 2011 and 2015. Barcelona has established itself as one of the strongest sides in European competitions, when measured in UEFA coefficients.[3][17]

Season Round Opposing team Score Notes
1959–60[18] Preliminary round Bulgaria CSKA Sofia 2–2 (A), 6–2 (H)
First round Italy Milan 2–0 (A), 5–1 (H)
Quarter-final England Wolverhampton Wanderers 4–0 (H), 5–2 (A)
Semi-final Spain Real Madrid 1–3 (A), 1–3 (H)
1960–61[19] Preliminary round Belgium Lierse 2–0 (H), 3–0 (A)
First round Spain Real Madrid 2–2 (A), 2–1 (H)
Quarter-final Czechoslovakia Hradec Králové 4–0 (H), 1–1 (A)
Semi-final West Germany Hamburger SV 1–0 (H), 1–2 (A) [O]
Final Portugal Benfica 2–3 (N)
1974–75[20] First round Austria Linz 0–0 (A), 5–0 (H)
Second round Netherlands Feyenoord 0–0 (A), 3–0 (H)
Quarter-final Sweden Åtvidabergs FF 2–0 (H), 3–0 (A)
Semi-final England Leeds United 1–2 (A), 1–1 (H)
1985–86[21] First round Czechoslovakia Sparta Prague 2–1 (A), 0–1 (H) [A]
Second round Portugal Porto 2–0 (H), 1–3 (A) [A]
Quarter-final Italy Juventus 1–0 (H), 1–1 (A)
Semi-final Sweden IFK Göteborg 0–3 (A), 3–0 (H) [D]
Final Romania Steaua București 0–0 (N) [E]
1991–92[22] First round East Germany Hansa Rostock 3–0 (H), 0–1 (A)
Second round West Germany 1. FC Kaiserslautern 2–0 (H), 1–3 (A) [A]
Group B Czechoslovakia Sparta Prague 3–2 (H), 0–1 (A)
Group B Portugal Benfica 0–0 (A), 2–1 (H)
Group B Soviet Union Dynamo Kyiv 2–0 (A), 3–0 (H)
Final Italy Sampdoria 1–0 (N)
1992–93[23] First round Norway Viking 1–0 (H), 0–0 (A)
Second round Russia CSKA Moscow 1–1 (A), 2–3 (H)
1993–94[24] First round Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 1–3 (A), 4–1 (H)
Second round Austria Austria Wien 3–0 (H), 2–1 (A)
Group A Turkey Galatasaray 0–0 (A), 3–0 (H)
Group A France Monaco 2–0 (H), 1–0 (A)
Group A Russia Spartak Moscow 2–2 (A), 5–1 (H)
Semi-final Portugal Porto 3–0 (H)
Final Italy Milan 0–4 (N)
1994–95[25] Group A Turkey Galatasaray 2–1 (H), 1–2 (A)
Group A Sweden IFK Göteborg 1–2 (A), 1–1 (H)
Group A England Manchester United 2–2 (A), 4–0 (H)
Quarter-final France Paris Saint-Germain 1–1 (H), 1–2 (A)
1997–98[26] Second Qualifying round Latvia Skonto 3–2 (H), 1–0 (A)
Group C England Newcastle United 2–3 (A), 1–0 (H)
Group C Netherlands PSV 2–2 (H), 2–2 (A)
Group C Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 0–3 (A), 0–4 (H)
1998–99[27] Group D England Manchester United 3–3 (A), 3–3 (H)
Group D Denmark Brøndby 2–0 (H), 2–0 (A)
Group D Germany Bayern Munich 0–1 (A), 1–2 (H)
1999–2000[28] Group B Sweden AIK 2–1 (A), 5–0 (H)
Group B Italy Fiorentina 4–2 (H), 3–3 (A)
Group B England Arsenal 1–1 (H), 4–2 (A)
Group A second stage Germany Hertha BSC 1–1 (A), 3–1 (H)
Group A second stage Czech Republic Sparta Prague 5–0 (H), 2–1 (A)
Group A second stage Portugal Porto 4–2 (H), 2–0 (A)
Quarter-final England Chelsea 1–3 (A), 5–1 (H)
Semi-final Spain Valencia 1–4 (A), 2–1 (H)
2000–01[29] Group H England Leeds United 4–0 (H), 1–1 (A)
Group H Turkey Beşiktaş 0–3 (A), 5–0 (H)
Group H Italy Milan 0–2 (H), 3–3 (A)
2001–02[30] Third Qualifying round Poland Wisła Kraków 4–3 (A), 1–0 (H)
Group F Turkey Fenerbahçe 3–0 (A), 1–0 (H)
Group F Germany Bayer Leverkusen 1–2 (A), 2–1 (H)
Group F France Lyon 2–0 (H), 3–2 (A)
Group B second stage England Liverpool 3–1 (A), 0–0 (H)
Group B second stage Turkey Galatasaray 2–2 (H), 1–0 (A)
Group B second stage Italy Roma 1–1 (H), 0–3 (A)
Quarter-final Greece Panathinaikos 0–1 (A), 3–1 (H)
Semi-final Spain Real Madrid 0–2 (H), 1–1 (A)
2002–03[31] Third Qualifying round Poland Legia Warsaw 3–0 (H), 1–0 (A)
Group H Belgium Club Brugge 3–2 (H), 1–0 (A)
Group H Turkey Galatasaray 2–0 (A), 3–1 (H)
Group H Russia Lokomotiv Moscow 3–1 (A), 1–0 (H)
Group A second stage Germany Bayer Leverkusen 2–1 (A), 2–0 (H)
Group A second stage England Newcastle United 3–1 (H), 2–0 (A)
Group A second stage Italy Internazionale 3–0 (H), 0–0 (A)
Quarter-final Italy Juventus 1–1 (A), 1–2 (H)
2004–05[32] Group F Scotland Celtic 3–1 (A), 1–1 (H)
Group F Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk 3–0 (H), 0–2 (A)
Group F Italy Milan 0–1 (A), 2–1 (H)
Round of 16 England Chelsea 2–1 (H), 2–4 (A)
2005–06[33] Group C Germany Werder Bremen 2–0 (A), 3–1 (H)
Group C Italy Udinese 4–1 (H), 2–0 (A)
Group C Greece Panathinaikos 0–0 (A), 5–0 (H)
Round of 16 England Chelsea 2–1 (A), 1–1 (H)
Quarter-final Portugal Benfica 0–0 (A), 2–0 (H)
Semi-final Italy Milan 1–0 (A), 0–0 (H)
Final England Arsenal 2–1 (N)
2006–07[34] Group A Bulgaria Levski Sofia 5–0 (H), 2–0 (A)
Group A Germany Werder Bremen 1–1 (A), 2–0 (H)
Group A England Chelsea 0–1 (A), 2–2 (H)
Round of 16 England Liverpool 1–2 (H), 1–0 (A) [B]
2007–08[35] Group E France Lyon 3–0 (H), 2–2 (A)
Group E Germany VfB Stuttgart 2–0 (A), 3–1 (H)
Group E Scotland Rangers 0–0 (A), 2–0 (H)
Round of 16 Scotland Celtic 3–2 (A), 1–0 (H)
Quarter-final Germany Schalke 04 1–0 (A), 1–0 (H)
Semi-final England Manchester United 0–0 (H), 0–1 (A)
2008–09[36] Third Qualifying round Poland Wisła Kraków 4–0 (H), 0–1 (A)
Group C Portugal Sporting CP 3–1 (H), 5–2 (A)
Group C Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk 2–1 (A), 2–3 (H)
Group C Switzerland Basel 5–0 (A), 1–1 (H)
Round of 16 France Lyon 1–1 (A), 5–2 (H)
Quarter-final Germany Bayern Munich 4–0 (H), 1–1 (A)
Semi-final England Chelsea 0–0 (H), 1–1 (A) [A]
Final England Manchester United 2–0 (N)
2009–10[37] Group F Italy Internazionale 0–0 (A), 2–0 (H)
Group F Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv 2–0 (H), 2–1 (A)
Group F Russia Rubin Kazan 1–2 (H), 0–0 (A)
Round of 16 Germany VfB Stuttgart 1–1 (A), 4–0 (H)
Quarter-final England Arsenal 2–2 (A), 4–1 (H)
Semi-final Italy Internazionale 1–3 (A), 1–0 (H)
2010–11[38] Group D Denmark Copenhagen 2–0 (H), 1–1 (A)
Group D Russia Rubin Kazan 1–1 (A), 2–0 (H)
Group D Greece Panathinaikos 5–1 (H), 3–0 (A)
Round of 16 England Arsenal 1–2 (A), 3–1 (H)
Quarter-final Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk 5–1 (H), 1–0 (A)
Semi-final Spain Real Madrid 2–0 (A), 1–1 (H)
Final England Manchester United 3–1 (N)
2011–12[39] Group H Italy Milan 2–2 (H), 3–2 (A)
Group H Belarus BATE Borisov 5–0 (A), 4–0 (H)
Group H Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň 2–0 (H), 4–0 (A)
Round of 16 Germany Bayer Leverkusen 3–1 (A), 7–1 (H)
Quarter-final Italy Milan 0–0 (A), 3–1 (H)
Semi-final England Chelsea 0–1 (A), 2–2 (H)
2012–13[40] Group G Russia Spartak Moscow 3–2 (H), 3–0 (A)
Group G Portugal Benfica 2–0 (A), 0–0 (H)
Group G Scotland Celtic 2–1 (H), 1–2 (A)
Round of 16 Italy Milan 0–2 (A), 4–0 (H)
Quarter-final France Paris Saint-Germain 2–2 (A), 1–1 (H)
Semi-final Germany Bayern Munich 0–4 (A), 0–3 (H)
2013–14[41] Group H Netherlands Ajax 4–0 (H), 1–2 (A)
Group H Italy Milan 1–1 (A), 3–1 (H)
Group H Scotland Celtic 1–0 (A), 6–1 (H)
Round of 16 England Manchester City 2–0 (A), 2–1 (H)
Quarter-final Spain Atlético Madrid 1–1 (H), 0–1 (A)
2014–15 Group F Cyprus APOEL 1–0 (H), 4–0 (A)
Group F France Paris Saint-Germain 2–3 (A), 3–1 (H)
Group F Netherlands Ajax 3–1 (H), 2–0 (A)
Round of 16 England Manchester City 2–1 (A), 1–0 (H)
Quarter-final France Paris Saint Germain 3–1 (A), 2–0 (H)
Semi-final Germany Bayern Munich 3–0 (H), 2–3 (A)
Final Italy Juventus 3–1 (N)
2015–16 Group E Italy Roma 1–1 (A), 6–1 (H)
Germany Bayer Leverkusen 2–1 (H), 1–1 (A)
Belarus BATE Borisov 2–0 (A), 3–0 (H)
Round of 16 England Arsenal 2–0 (A), 3–1 (H)
Quarter-final Spain Atlético Madrid 2–1 (H), 0–2 (A)
2016–17 Group C Scotland Celtic 7–0 (H), 2–0 (A)
Germany Borussia Mönchengladbach 4–0 (H), 2–1 (A)
England Manchester City 4–0 (H), 1–3 (A)
Round of 16 France Paris Saint Germain 0–4 (A), 6–1 (H)
Quarter-final Italy Juventus 0–3 (A), 0–0 (H)
2017–18 Group D Italy Juventus 3–0 (H), 0-0 (A)
Portugal Sporting CP 1–0 (A), 2–0 (H)
Greece Olympiacos 3–1 (H), 0–0 (A)
Round of 16 England Chelsea – (A), – (H)

UEFA Cup Winners' Cup[edit]

Bobby Robson, 1988
Bobby Robson (1988 image) led Barcelona to victory in the 1996–97 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup, which formed part of a cup treble.
Barcelona vs. Paris SG, 1997
Ronaldo's converted penalty in the 1997 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup Final saw Barcelona beat Paris SG 1–0 and rack up a record fourth Cup Winners' Cup title.

The Cup Winners' Cup started in 1960, but it took three years until Barcelona participated for the first time. In their first edition, they were eliminated in the first round by Hamburg SV. In 1969, their second participation, they advanced to the final, but were beaten by Czechoslovakian side Slovan Bratislava. The first success came in 1979 when they defeated Fortuna Düsseldorf in the final, by 4–3 after extra time. This maiden success was emulated in 1982, 1989, and in their last participation in 1997, before the cup was reorganised into the UEFA Cup in 1999–2000. Barcelona's four victories are the most of any club.[42]

Season Round Opposing team Score Notes
1963–64[43] Preliminary round Republic of Ireland Shelbourne 2–0 (A), 3–1 (H)
First round West Germany Hamburger SV 4–4 (H), 0–0 (A) [G]
1968–69[44] First round Switzerland Lugano 1–0 (A), 3–0 (H)
Second round
Bye
Quarter-final Norway Lyn 3–2 (H), 2–2 (A)
Semi-final West Germany 1. FC Köln 2–2 (A), 4–1 (H)
Final Czechoslovakia Slovan Bratislava 2–3 (N)
1971–72[45] First round Northern Ireland Distillery 3–1 (A), 4–0 (H)
Second round Romania Steaua București 0–1 (H), 1–2 (A)
1978–79[46] First round Soviet Union Shakhtar Donetsk 3–0 (H), 1–1 (A)
Second round Belgium Anderlecht 0–3 (A), 3–0 (H) [F]
Quarter-final England Ipswich Town 1–2 (A), 1–0 (H) [A]
Semi-final Belgium Beveren 1–0 (H), 1–0 (A)
Final West Germany Fortuna Düsseldorf 4–3 (N)
1979–80[47] First round Iceland ÍA 1–0 (A), 5–0 (H)
Second round Luxembourg Aris Bonnevoie 4–1 (A), 7–1 (H)
Quarter-final Spain Valencia 0–1 (H), 3–4 (A)
1981–82[48] First round Bulgaria Botev Plovdiv 4–1 (H), 0–1 (A)
Second round Czechoslovakia Dukla Prague 0–1 (A), 4–0 (H)
Quarter-final East Germany Lokomotive Leipzig 3–0 (A), 1–2 (H)
Semi-final England Tottenham Hotspur 1–1 (A), 1–0 (H)
Final Belgium Standard Liège 2–1 (H)
1982–83[49] First round Cyprus Apollon Limassol 8–0 (H), 1–1 (A)
Second round Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Red Star Belgrade 4–2 (H), 2–1 (A)
Quarter-final Austria Austria Wien 0–0 (A), 1–1 (H) [B]
1983–84[50] First round East Germany 1. FC Magdeburg 5–1 (A), 2–0 (H)
Second round Netherlands NEC 3–2 (A), 2–0 (H)
Quarter-final England Manchester United 2–0 (H), 0–3 (A)
1984–85[51] First round France Metz 4–2 (A), 1–4 (H)
1988–89[52] First round Iceland Fram 2–0 (A), 5–0 (H)
Second round Poland Lech Poznań 1–1 (H), 1–1 (A) [D]
Quarter-final Denmark AGF 1–0 (A), 0–0 (H)
Semi-final Bulgaria CSKA Sofia 4–2 (H), 2–1 (A)
Final Italy Sampdoria 2–0 (N)
1989–90[53] First round Poland Legia Warsaw 1–1 (H), 1–0 (A)
Second round Belgium Anderlecht 0–2 (A), 2–1 (H)
1990–91[54] First round Turkey Trabzonspor 0–1 (A), 7–2 (H)
Second round Iceland Fram 2–1 (A), 3–0 (H)
Quarter-final Soviet Union Dynamo Kyiv 3–2 (A), 1–1 (H)
Semi-final Italy Juventus 3–1 (H), 0–1 (A)
Final England Manchester United 1–2 (N)
1996–97[55] First round Cyprus AEK Larnaca 2–0 (H), 0–0 (A)
Second round Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Red Star Belgrade 3–1 (H), 1–1 (A)
Quarter-final Sweden AIK 3–1 (H), 1–1 (A)
Semi-final Italy Fiorentina 1–1 (A), 2–0 (H)
Final France Paris Saint-Germain 1–0 (N)

Inter-Cities Fairs Cup / UEFA Cup / UEFA Europa League[edit]

1958 Fairs Cup Final match ball
The ball used in the final of the 1958 edition of the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup, residing in the FC Barcelona Museum.
Barcelona vs. PSV Eindhoven, 1978
FCB face PSV in the 1977–78 UEFA Cup semi-finals. They also finished the season as Copa del Rey winners.
Johan Cruyff
Johan Cruyff participated in several unsuccessful attempts to win the UEFA Cup in his time with Barcelona.

The Inter-Cities Fairs Cup was established on 18 April 1955, two weeks after the European Cup, to promote trade fairs by playing various cities against each other. However, the city of Barcelona participated with a squad composed entirely of Barcelona players. From 1958 onwards, the organisers reverted to club participation, but the teams still had to come from cities staging trade fairs. Barcelona would go on to win the Fairs Cup a record three times before it was subsumed into the UEFA Cup in 1971.[56]

The Inter-Cities Fairs Cup is considered to be the forerunner of the UEFA Europa League, but it is not recognized as a UEFA competition. Consequently, Inter-Cities Fairs Cup wins do not count toward the tally of Europa League wins.[57] This list tallies the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup together with the Europa League tournament. In the UEFA Cup/UEFA Europa League, Barcelona has lost four semi-finals, in 1975–76, in 1977–78, in 1995–96, in 2000–01. Twice they lost to Liverpool (in 1976 and in 2001), once against PSV (in 1978) and once against Bayern Munich (in 1996). In all four cases, the team that had eliminated Barcelona ultimately won the competition.

Season Round Opposing team[2][58][59] Score Notes
1955–58 Group A Denmark Copenhagen XI 6–2 (H), 1–1 (A)
Group A Austria Vienna XI [L]
Semi-final England Birmingham City 3–4 (A), 1–0 (H) [J]
Final England London XI 2–2 (A), 6–0 (H)
1958–60 First round Switzerland Basel XI 2–1 (A), 5–2 (H)
Quarter-final Italy Internazionale 4–0 (H), 4–2 (A)
Semi-final Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Belgrade XI 4–2 (A), 4–2 (H)
Final England Birmingham City 0–0 (A), 4–1 (H)
1960–61 First round Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Zagreb XI 1–1 (A), 4–3 (H)
Quarter-final Scotland Hibernian 4–4 (H), 2–3 (A)
1961–62 First round West Germany West Berlin XI 0–1 (A), 3–0 (H)
Second round Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Dinamo Zagreb 5–1 (H), 2–2 (A)
Quarter-final England Sheffield Wednesday 2–3 (A), 2–0 (H)
Semi-final Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Red Star Belgrade 2–0 (A), 4–1 (H)
Final Spain Valencia 2–6 (A), 1–1 (H)
1962–63 First round Portugal Belenenses 1–1 (A), 1–1 (H) [M]
Second round Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Red Star Belgrade 2–3 (A), 1–0 (H) [K]
1964–65 First round Italy Fiorentina 0–1 (H), 2–0 (A)
Second round Scotland Celtic 3–1 (H), 0–0 (A)
Third round France Strasbourg 0–0 (A), 2–2 (H) [C]
1965–66 First round Netherlands Utrecht 0–0 (A), 7–1 (H)
Second round Belgium Royal Antwerp 1–2 (A), 2–0 (H)
Third round West Germany Hannover 96 1–2 (A), 1–0 (H) [I]
Quarter-final Spain Espanyol 1–0 (H), 1–0 (A)
Semi-final England Chelsea 2–0 (H), 0–2 (A) [H]
Final Spain Real Zaragoza 0–1 (A), 4–2 (H)
1966–67 First round
Bye
Second round Scotland Dundee United 1–2 (H), 0–2 (A)
1967–68 First round Switzerland Zürich 1–3 (A), 1–0 (H)
1969–70 First round Denmark B1913 4–0 (H), 2–0 (A)
Second round Hungary Győri ETO 3–2 (A), 2–0 (H)
Third round Italy Internazionale 1–2 (H), 1–1 (A)
1970–71 First round Poland GKS Katowice 1–0 (A), 3–2 (H)
Second round Italy Juventus 1–2 (H), 1–2 (A)
1971 Play-off Match England Leeds United 2–1 (H) [N]
1972–73 First round Portugal Porto 1–3 (A), 0–1 (H)
1973–74 First round France Nice 0–3 (A), 2–0 (H)
1975–76 First round Greece PAOK 0–1 (A), 6–1 (H)
Second round Italy Lazio 3–0 (A), 4–0 (H)
Third round Hungary Vasas 3–1 (H), 1–0 (A)
Quarter-final Bulgaria Levski Sofia 4–0 (H), 4–5 (A)
Semi-final England Liverpool 0–1 (H), 1–1 (A)
1976–77 First round Portugal Belenenses 2–2 (A), 3–2 (H)
Second round Belgium Lokeren 2–0 (H), 1–2 (A)
Third round Sweden Östers IF 3–0 (A), 5–1 (H)
Quarter-final Spain Athletic Bilbao 1–2 (A), 2–2 (H)
1977–78 First round Romania Steaua București 5–1 (H), 3–1 (A)
Second round Netherlands AZ 1–1 (A), 1–1 (H) [D]
Third round England Ipswich Town 0–3 (A), 3–0 (H) [F]
Quarter-final England Aston Villa 2–2 (A), 2–1 (H)
Semi-final Netherlands PSV 0–3 (A), 3–1 (H)
1980–81 First round Malta Sliema Wanderers 2–0 (A), 1–0 (H)
Second round West Germany 1. FC Köln 1–0 (A), 0–4 (H)
1986–87 First round Albania Flamurtari 1–1 (A), 0–0 (H) [A]
Second round Portugal Sporting CP 1–0 (H), 1–2 (A) [A]
Third round West Germany Uerdingen 05 2–0 (A), 2–0 (H)
Quarter-final Scotland Dundee United 0–1 (A), 1–2 (H)
1987–88 First round Portugal Belenenses 2–0 (H), 0–1 (A)
Second round Soviet Union Dynamo Moscow 2–0 (H), 0–0 (A)
Third round Albania Flamurtari 4–1 (H), 0–1 (A)
Fourth round West Germany Bayer Leverkusen 0–0 (A), 0–1 (H)
1995–96 First round Israel Hapoel Be'er Sheva 7–0 (A), 5–0 (H)
Second round Portugal Vitória de Guimarães 3–0 (H), 4–0 (A)
Third round Spain Sevilla 1–1 (A), 3–1 (H)
Quarter-final Netherlands PSV 2–2 (H), 3–2 (A)
Semi-final Germany Bayern Munich 2–2 (A), 1–2 (H)
2000–01 Third round Belgium Club Brugge 2–0 (A), 1–1 (H)
Fourth round Greece AEK Athens 1–0 (A), 5–0 (H)
Quarter-final Spain Celta Vigo 2–1 (H), 2–3 (A) [A]
Semi-final England Liverpool 0–0 (H), 0–1 (A)
2003–04 First round Slovakia Matador Púchov 1–1 (A), 8–0 (H)
Second round Greece Panionios 3–0 (A), 2–0 (H)
Third round Denmark Brøndby 1–0 (A), 2–1 (H)
Fourth round Scotland Celtic 0–1 (A), 0–0 (H)

UEFA Super Cup[edit]

The UEFA Super Cup was inaugurated in 1973 as a way of determining the best team in Europe, by pitting the holders of the European Champion Clubs' Cup against the winners of the Cup Winners' Cup.[60] Barcelona first participated in the 1979 edition, after they won the 1978–79 Cup Winners' Cup. They lost 1–2 on aggregate to Nottingham Forest, having drawn 1–1 in Camp Nou after losing 0–1 in City Ground, Nottingham. The first victory was in the 1992 edition, when they beaten Werder Bremen 3–2 on aggregate. Since then, Barcelona has won the competition four additional times (in 1997, 2009, 2011 and 2015) and now shares the record of victories (five) with Milan.

Year Opposing team[61] Score Venue
1979 England Nottingham Forest 1–2 on aggregate Two-legged
1982 England Aston Villa 1–3 on aggregate Two-legged
1989 Italy Milan 1–2 on aggregate Two-legged
1992 Germany Werder Bremen 3–2 on aggregate Two-legged
1997 Germany Borussia Dortmund 3–1 on aggregate Two-legged
2006 Spain Sevilla 0–3 Stade Louis II, Monaco
2009 Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk 1–0 after extra time Stade Louis II, Monaco
2011 Portugal Porto 2–0 Stade Louis II, Monaco
2015 Spain Sevilla 5–4 after extra time Boris Paichadze Dinamo Arena, Tbilisi

Intercontinental Cup / FIFA Club World Cup[edit]

In 1960, UEFA and their South-American equivalent, the South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL), created the Intercontinental Cup as a way of determining the best team in the world, by pitting the winners of the European Champions' Cup and the South American Copa Libertadores against each other. In 2000, FIFA launched their international club competition called the FIFA Club World Cup, featuring teams from all of its member associations. In the second edition of the Club World Cup, in 2005, FIFA took over the Intercontinental Cup, subsuming it into its own competition. Barcelona has won the FIFA Club World Cup three times (in 2009, 2011 and 2015) a record for this competition, shared with Real Madrid.[62][63][64]

Year Competition Opposing team Score Venue
1992 Intercontinental Cup Brazil São Paulo 1–2 National Stadium, Tokyo, Japan
2006 FIFA Club World Cup Brazil Internacional 0–1 International Stadium, Yokohama, Japan[65]
2009 FIFA Club World Cup Argentina Estudiantes La Plata 2–1 Sheikh Zayed Stadium, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates[66]
2011 FIFA Club World Cup Brazil Santos 4–0 International Stadium, Yokohama, Japan[65]
2015 FIFA Club World Cup Argentina River Plate 3–0 International Stadium, Yokohama, Japan[65]

Notes[edit]

  • A. a b c d e f g h i Won on the away goals rule.
  • B. a b Lost on the away goals rule.
  • C. a Lost on coin toss.
  • D. a b c Won 5–4 on penalties.[67][68][69]
  • O. Won play-off 1–0 in Brussels.
  • E. a Lost 0–2 on penalties.[21]
  • F. a Won 3–1 on penalties.[69]
  • G. a Lost play-off 2–3 in Lausanne.[43]
  • H. a Won play-off 5–0 in Barcelona.[2]
  • I. a Won on coin toss.[2]
  • J. a Won play-off 2–1 in Basel.[2]
  • K. a Lost play-off 0–1 in Nice.[2]
  • L. a Vienna XI withdrew from the competition.[2]
  • M. a Won play-off 1–0 in Barcelona.[2]
  • N. a After the 1970–71 season the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup was taken over by UEFA. A match was played between FC Barcelona, the first Fairs Cup winners, and Leeds United, the last winners, to decide who should keep the old Fairs Cup trophy permanently.[70]

References[edit]

In the UEFA references, access to the specific rounds is achievable by the adjacent table.

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