Fauna of Toronto

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A coyote is spotted at Neville Park ravine in Toronto.

The Fauna of Toronto include a variety of different species that have adapted to the urban environment, its parks, its ravine system, and the creeks and rivers that run throughout the city. Many other animals from outside the city limits have been known to straddle inside on from time to time.

Amphibians and reptiles[edit]

Blanding's turtles are one of several endangered species to inhabit Toronto.

The following amphibian and reptile species (sorted by family taxons) may be found throughout the City of Toronto:

Birds[edit]

At least 199 bird species were confirmed to breed in the area, with a total of 403 species of birds recorded in the Greater Toronto Area (either breeding, in migration, or vagrant).[27] The following bird species (sorted by family taxons) have been spotted in the City of Toronto, and Greater Toronto:[27]

Blue jays may be seen throughout the city. Toronto's Major League Baseball team is named after the bird.
The common loon is the provincial bird of Ontario, and a bird species that breeds within Greater Toronto.[27]
An Iceland gull at the Scarborough Bluffs. The gull is one of 11 species from the larus genus that has been recorded in the city.
Introduced to the local ecosystem in the 19th century, mute swans are seen as an invasive species in Toronto. Their population requires regular management from the TRCA.[28]
A northern mockingbird perched on a branch at Humber Bay Park.
A northern cardinal at Lambton Woods Park in Toronto.
A red-tailed hawk eating a bird near St. Lawrence Market. The hawk is one of six species of the Buteo genus spotted in Toronto.
A snowy owl at the Leslie Street Spit. Snowy owls winter throughout southern Canada, including Toronto.

Insects[edit]

A monarch butterfly nectaring at Humber Bay, Toronto.

The following insects may be found throughout the City of Toronto including:

Fish[edit]

The following fish species are found in the creeks, ponds, and rivers that that make up the Toronto waterway system, and the Toronto waterfront along Lake Ontario:[29][30]

Mammals[edit]

An eastern cottontail rabbit on a field in Toronto.

The following mammal species (sorted by family taxons) may be found throughout the City of Toronto:[31]

Historic species[edit]

The historic range for several mammal species once extended into the City of Toronto. However, as the city developed, the natural range for several mammals receded beyond the city limits. The historic range for the following mammals once included Toronto, but were pushed beyond the city limits prior to 1912:[31]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Introduced, non-native species.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Snapping Turtle". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  2. ^ "Eastern Gartersnake". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  3. ^ "DeKay's Brownsnake". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  4. ^ "Milksnake". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  5. ^ "Red-bellied snake". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  6. ^ "Northern watersnake". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  7. ^ "Smooth Greensnake". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  8. ^ "Gray Treefrog". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  9. ^ "Spring Peeper". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  10. ^ "Western Chorus Frog". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  11. ^ "Eastern Musk Turtle". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  12. ^ "Eastern Red-backed Salamander". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  13. ^ "Spotted Salamander". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  14. ^ "Blanding's Turtle". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  15. ^ "Midland Painted Turtle". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  16. ^ "Northern Map Turtle". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  17. ^ Robinson, Michael (24 June 2015). "Turtles face a threat from one of their own: red-eared invaders". Toronto Star. Torstar Corporation. Retrieved 16 September 2018.
  18. ^ "Spotted Turtle". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  19. ^ "Wood Turtle". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  20. ^ "Mudpuppy". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  21. ^ "American Bullfrog". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  22. ^ "Green Frog". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  23. ^ "Northern Leopard Frog". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  24. ^ "Wood Frog". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  25. ^ "Red-spotted salmander". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  26. ^ "American Toad". Ontario Nature. 2018. Retrieved 12 September 2018.
  27. ^ a b c "Checklist of the Birds of the Greater Toronto Area (2011)" (PDF). Birds of Toronto: A guide to their remarkable world. City of Toronto. 2011. p. 46–47. Retrieved 25 August 2018.
  28. ^ "Mute swan - Canada goose - Toronto Waterfront". City of Toronto. 2018. Retrieved 28 May 2018.
  29. ^ "Fishes of Toronto" (PDF). City of Toronto. 2011. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  30. ^ "Existing conditions: fish and other species". Toronto and Region Conservation Authority. 2018. Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  31. ^ a b "Checklist of the Mammals of Toronto" (PDF). Mammals of Toronto. City of Toronto. 2012. Retrieved 2 June 2018.

External links[edit]