Golden Gaytime

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Golden Gaytime
Golden Gaytime.png
An original flavour Golden Gaytime
Alternative namesCookie Crumble
TypeIce cream
CourseDessert
Place of originAustralia
Invented1959; 63 years ago (1959)

Golden Gaytime (Cookie Crumble in New Zealand[1]) is a popular ice cream snack that is made and distributed by the Streets confectionery company in Australia, and first released in 1959.[2] It is a toffee and vanilla ice cream dipped in compound chocolate, and wrapped in vanilla biscuit-like "crumbs" on a wooden paddlepop-stick. Its name has survived intact regardless, or because, of the possible homosexual connotations in modern decades.[3]

Variations[edit]

On 4 August 2015, Streets released Golden Gaytime ice-cream tub format in addition to its usual popsicle stick format, as well as selling a tub of the ice cream's crumbs on the side.[4] On 7 September 2016, Streets released the Golden Gaytime cross Cornetto cone – named Golden Gaynetto – in addition to other formats.[5] In 2017, Streets released a Golden Gaytime ice-cream sandwich named the Golden Gaytime Sanga ("Sanga" being Australian slang for sandwich).[6] A rainbow variant was also created in support of the LGBT community in 2017. In the summer of 2020, several locations in Melbourne and Sydney held pop-up stores that contained various exclusive crumb variations, ranging from vanilla crumb, musk sticks, strawberry hard candy, popping candy and edible glitter, to vanilla crumb, pretzel bits and salted caramel drizzle.[7]

Gaytime has also collaborated with various other companies to release Gaytime-flavoured versions of their products, including Gaytime Krispy Kreme donuts, Gaytime Coco Pops, and various Gaytime dessert mixes made by Green's baking, including mousse, cake, brownies and brookies.

Flavours[edit]

Various flavours have been introduced, especially in the mid-2010s onwards, with some exclusive to particular stores (Krispy Kreme doughnut flavoured Golden Gaytime was initially released exclusively in 7-Eleven stores).

Flavour variety Date introduced
Strawberry 2015
Mint 2015
Chocolate 2015
Unicorn 2017[8]
Piña Colada 2017[8]
Choc Mint McMint Face 2017[8]
Choc Fever 2018[9]
Salty 2018[9]
Violet Crumble 2019[10]
Krispy Kreme 2020[11]
Birthday Cake 2020[12]
Coco Pops 2021[13]
Crunchy Nut 2021[13]
Froot Loops 2021[13]

Advertising[edit]

The company appears to embrace the camp name by retaining the tagline from the 1980s, "It's hard to have a Gaytime on your own". The in-home boxes feature the words "4 delicious chances to have a gay time".[14] Ads featuring the slogan also occasionally featured men who would accidentally get into risqué positions whilst trying to get a Gaytime. In 2009, Streets started re-airing a television commercial from the 1980s.[15]

Cultural impact[edit]

The double meaning of the name is highlighted in The Bedroom Philosopher song "Golden Gaytime".[citation needed]

In 2018, several Indonesians attempted to boycott Unilever over the product due to its name and the rainbow variant in 2017 that was released to support the LGBT community. Unilever Indonesia released a statement in support of the boycotters, but also pointing out that Gaytimes have never been sold in Indonesia.[16]

In early 2021, an online petition to change the product's name to something "less offensive" gained traction on social media. However, it was met with backlash by the general public, and Streets has stated that they won't change the product's name.[citation needed] In the same year, the name of the product was criticised by a Muslim association in Malaysia.[17]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chung, Frank (14 October 2016). "Kiwis don't know how to have a Gaytime". News.com.au. Retrieved 12 February 2017.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-03-28. Retrieved 2012-07-26.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ Review / John McGrath. "Garden of earthly delights". The Adelaide Review. Archived from the original on February 7, 2006.
  4. ^ Whiting, Alexandra (4 August 2015). "Golden Gaytime in a Tub Is a Reality! But Not Because of the Fans". PopSugar. Retrieved 12 February 2017.
  5. ^ "Streets launches Golden Gaynetto ice cream, combining Golden Gaytimes and Cornettos". NewsComAu. 2016-09-06. Retrieved 2020-02-04.
  6. ^ "Streets announce official release of Golden Gaytime Sanga". 26 October 2017. Retrieved 1 November 2017.
  7. ^ Golden Gaytime Launches Pop-Up W/ Dope New Flavours & Takeaway Crumbs
  8. ^ a b c "Golden Gaytime launches fresh flavours". NewsComAu. 2017-10-27. Retrieved 2021-01-26.
  9. ^ a b "They've done something insane to our beloved Golden Gaytime". NewsComAu. 2018-11-01. Retrieved 2021-01-26.
  10. ^ "Aussie ice cream lovers' dream: Two national icons to combine". 7NEWS.com.au. 2019-09-19. Retrieved 2021-01-26.
  11. ^ "New! You can now buy Krispy Kreme Golden Gaytime Ice Creams - and they're half-price this week!". New Idea Food. Retrieved 2021-01-26.
  12. ^ "Golden Gaytime drop a new flavour in celebration of its 100th birthday!". New Idea Food. Retrieved 2021-01-26.
  13. ^ a b c "Golden Gaytime Coco Pops vs Coco Pop Golden Gaytimes". Lifehacker Australia. 2021-02-24. Retrieved 2021-04-05.
  14. ^ "Box design of golden gaytime". Retrieved 2010-01-10.
  15. ^ 2 March 2009. "Golden Gaytime". YouTube. Archived from the original on 2021-12-14. Retrieved 2010-01-10.
  16. ^ Anti-LGBT Indonesians threaten to boycott Unilever over Golden Gaytime ice cream (that isn’t sold in Indonesia) - Coconuts
  17. ^ nasephia (2021-05-18). "This Ice Cream's Name Made Some M'sians Angry, Here's The Real Story & Irony Behind Golden Gaytime". Retrieved 2021-10-23.