Massachusetts's 6th congressional district

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Massachusetts's 6th congressional district
Massachusetts US Congressional District 6 (since 2013).tif
Massachusetts's 6th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
U.S. RepresentativeSeth Moulton (DSalem)
Area480.31 sq mi (1,244.0 km2)
Distribution
  • 63.15% urban
  • 36.85% rural
Population (2000)636,554
Median income$85,951[1]
Ethnicity
Occupation
Cook PVID+6[2]

Massachusetts's 6th congressional district is located in northeastern Massachusetts. It contains most of Essex County, including the North Shore and Cape Ann. It is represented by Seth Moulton, who has represented the district since January 2015. The shape of the district went through minor changes effective from the elections of 2012 after Massachusetts congressional redistricting to reflect the 2010 census. The towns of Tewksbury and Billerica were added, along with a small portion of the town of Andover.[3]

Cities and towns in the district[edit]

In Essex County:

The cities of: Amesbury, Beverly, Gloucester, Lynn, Newburyport, Peabody, and Salem
The towns of: Andover: Precincts 1, 7A, 8, and 9A, Boxford, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown, Groveland, Hamilton, Ipswich, Lynnfield, Manchester, Marblehead, Merrimac, Middleton, Nahant, Newbury, North Andover, Rockport, Rowley, Salisbury, Saugus, Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham, and West Newbury.

In Middlesex County:

The towns of: Bedford, Billerica, Burlington, North Reading, Reading, Tewksbury, Wakefield and Wilmington.

Cities and towns in the district prior to 2013[edit]

1840s[edit]

"Amherst, Belchertown, East-Hampton, Enfield, Granby, Greenwich, Hadley, Hatfield, Northampton, Pelham, Prescott, South Hadley, and Ware, in the County of Hampshire; Brimfield, Holland, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Monson, Palmer, Southwick, Springfield, Wales, Westfield, West Springfield, and Wilbraham, in the County of Hampden; Bernardston, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Leverett, Montague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell, and Whately in the County of Franklin; and Athol and Royalston, in the County of Worcester."[4]

1850s[edit]

"The cities of Lynn, Newburyport, and Salem, and the towns of Amesbury, Beverly, Essex, Georgetown, Gloucester, Groveland, Hamilton, Ipswich, Manchester, Marblehead, Newbury, Rockport, Rowley, Salisbury, Wenham, and West Newbury, in the county of Essex."[5]

1890s[edit]

"Suffolk County: City of Boston, wards 3, 4, and 5, and the towns of Chelsea, Revere, and Winthrop. Middlesex County: Towns of Everett, Malden, Medford, Melrose, Reading, Stoneham, Wakefield, and Winchester. Essex County: Towns of Lynn, Nahant, Saugus, and Swampscott."[6]

1910s[edit]

"Essex County: Cities of Beverly, Gloucester, Haverhill, Newburyport, and Salem; towns of Amesbury, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown, Groveland, Hamilton, Ipswich, Manchester, Marblehead, Merrimac, Newbury, Rockport, Rowley, Salisbury, Swampscott, Topsfleld, Wenham, and West Newbury."[7]

1920s-1980s[edit]

1990s[edit]

"Counties: Essex, Middlesex. Cities and townships: Amesbury, Bedford, Beverly, Boxford, Burlington, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown, Gloucester, Groveland, Hamilton, Haverhill, Ipswich, Lynn, Lynnfield, Manchester by the Sea, Marblehead, Merrimac, Middleton, Nahant, Newbury, Newburyport, North Andover, North Reading, Peabody, Reading (part), Rockport, Rowley, Salem, Salisbury, Saugus, Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham, West Newbury, and Wilmington."[8]

2003 to 2013[edit]

The district from 2003 to 2013

In Essex County:

The cities of: Amesbury, Beverly, Gloucester, Lynn, Newburyport, Peabody, and Salem
The towns of: Boxford, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown, Groveland, Hamilton, Ipswich, Lynnfield, Manchester, Marblehead, Merrimac, Middleton, Nahant, Newbury, North Andover, Rockport, Rowley, Salisbury, Saugus, Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham, and West Newbury.

In Middlesex County:

The towns of: Bedford, Billerica, Burlington, North Reading, Reading, Wakefield and Wilmington.

List of members representing the district[edit]

Representative Party Years Electoral history District location
George Thatcher.jpg
George Thatcher
Pro-
Administration
March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1791
Elected in 1788.
Redistricted to the 8th district.
Cumberland County and Lincoln County, District of Maine
George Leonard of Congress.jpg
George Leonard
Pro-
Administration
March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1790.
Lost re-election.
District discontinued March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
John Reed Sr. Federalist March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1801
Elected in 1794.
Re-elected in 1796.
Re-elected in 1798.
Retired.
"2nd Southern district"
Josiah Smith Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
Elected in 1800.
Retired.
Samuel Taggart Federalist March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1817
Elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Re-elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Retired.
"Hampshire North district"
Samuel C. Allen Federalist March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1823
Elected in 1816.
Re-elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1820.
Redistricted to the 7th district.
John Locke Adams-Clay Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Re-elected in 1826.
Retired.
Adams March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
Joseph G. Kendall Anti-Jackson March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1833
Elected in 1828.
Re-elected in 1830.
Retired.
George Grennell Jr. Anti-Jackson March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1833.
Re-elected in 1834.
Re-elected in 1836.
Retired.
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
JamesCAlvord.jpg
James Alvord
Whig March 4, 1839 –
September 27, 1839
Elected in 1838.
Died.
Vacant September 27, 1839 –
January 14, 1840
Osmyn Baker.jpg
Osmyn Baker
Whig January 14, 1840 –
March 3, 1845
Elected to finish Alvord's term.
Re-elected to the full term in 1840.
Re-elected in 1842.
Retired.
George Ashmun.png
George Ashmun
Whig March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1851
Elected in 1844.
Re-elected in 1846.
Re-elected in 1848.
Retired.
George T. Davis Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
Elected in 1850.
Retired.
Charles Wentworth Upham.png
Charles W. Upham
Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
Elected in 1852.
Lost re-election.
Timothy Davis Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
Elected in 1854.
Re-elected in 1856.
[Data unknown/missing.]
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
JohnBAlley.jpg
John B. Alley[9]
Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
Elected in 1858.
Re-elected in 1860.
Redistricted to the 5th district.
Daniel W Gooch.png
Daniel W. Gooch
Republican March 4, 1863 –
September 1, 1865
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1862.
Re-elected in 1864.
Resigned to become Navy agent of the port of Boston.
Vacant September 2, 1865 –
December 3, 1865
Nathaniel Prentice Banks.jpg
Nathaniel P. Banks[10]
Republican December 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1873
Elected to finish Gooch's term.
Re-elected in 1866.
Re-elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
Lost re-election.
Bfbutler.jpg
Benjamin F. Butler
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
Redistricted from the 5th district and re-elected in 1872.
Lost re-election.
CharlesPerkinsThompson.jpg
Charles Perkins Thompson
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
Elected in 1874.
Lost re-election.
George B. Loring - Brady-Handy.jpg
George B. Loring[11]
Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1881
Elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Lost renomination.
Eben Francis Stone CDV by John Adams Whipple, 1862.jpg
Eben F. Stone[12]
Republican March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
Elected in 1880.
Retired.
Henry B. Lovering.png
Henry B. Lovering
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
Elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Lost re-election.
Cabotlodgenationalportrait.jpg
Henry Cabot Lodge
Republican March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1893
Elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Redistircted to the 7th district and re-elected in 1892, but resigned when elected U.S. Senator.
William Cogswell2.jpg
William Cogswell
Republican March 4, 1893 –
May 22, 1895
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Died.
Vacant May 22, 1895 –
November 4, 1895
WHMoody.jpg
William H. Moody[13]
Republican November 5, 1895 –
May 1, 1902
Elected to finish Cogswell's term.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Resigned to become Secretary of the Navy
Vacant May 2, 1902 –
November 3, 1902
Augustus P. Gardner.png
Augustus P. Gardner[14]
Republican November 4, 1902 –
May 15, 1917
Elected to finish Moody's term and re-eelected to next term in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Re-elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Resigned to enter the army.
Vacant May 15, 1917 –
November 6, 1917
Willfred W. Lufkin.png
Willfred W. Lufkin
Republican November 6, 1917 –
June 30, 1921
Elected to finish Gardner's term.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Resigned to become Collector of Customs for the Port of Boston
Vacant June 30, 1921 –
September 27, 1921
Abram Piatt Andrew 1909.jpg
Abram Andrew
Republican September 27, 1921 –
June 3, 1936
Elected to finish Lufkin's term.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Died.
Vacant June 3, 1936 –
January 3, 1937
George J. Bates.png
George J. Bates[15]
Republican January 3, 1937 –
November 1, 1949
Elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Died in a plane crash.
Vacant November 1, 1949 –
February 14, 1950
William Henry Bates 89th Congress 1965.png
William H. Bates[16]
Republican February 14, 1950 –
June 22, 1969
Elected to finish his father's term.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Died.
Vacant June 22, 1969 –
September 30, 1969
Michael J. Harrington.jpg
Michael J. Harrington
Democratic September 30, 1969 –
January 3, 1979
Elected to finish Bates's term.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Retired.
MavroulesNicholas.jpg
Nicholas Mavroules[17]
Democratic January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1993
Elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Lost re-election.
Torkildsen.jpg
Peter G. Torkildsen
Republican January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1997
Elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Lost re-election.
John F Tierney congressional portrait 2009.jpg
John F. Tierney
Democratic January 3, 1997 –
January 3, 2015
Elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Lost renomination.
Seth Moulton.jpg
Seth Moulton
Democratic January 3, 2015 –
Present
Elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.

Recent election results[edit]

The following are the results from the last four general elections for U.S. House of Representatives to represent the Massachusetts's 6th Congressional District:

Massachusetts's 6th congressional district election, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John F. Tierney (incumbent) 179,603 48.3
Republican Richard Tisei 175,953 47.3
Libertarian Daniel Fishman 16,668 4.4
Total votes 372,224 100
Democratic hold
Massachusetts's 6th congressional district election, 2014[18][19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Seth Moulton 149,449 54.7
Republican Richard Tisei 111,848 40.9
Independent Chris Stockwell 12,175 4.5
Total votes 273,472 100
Democratic hold
Massachusetts's 6th congressional district election, 2016[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Seth Moulton (incumbent) 308,923 98.4
No party All Others 5,132 1.6%
Total votes 314,055 100
Democratic hold
Massachusetts's 6th congressional district election, 2018[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Seth Moulton (incumbent) 216,282 65.2
Republican Joseph Schneider 104,379 31.4
Independent Mary Jean Charbonneau 11,244 3.4
Total votes 331,905 100
Democratic hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=25&cd=06
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/spr/sprcat/catpdf2010/cong2010/CongressionalDistrict_2011State.pdf Access date: March 21, 2012.
  4. ^ John Hayward (1849). "Congressional Districts". Gazetteer of Massachusetts. Boston: J.P. Jewett & Co.
  5. ^ "Congressional Districts". Massachusetts Register 1862. Boston: Adams, Sampson, & Co.
  6. ^ W.H. Michael (1890). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-First Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  7. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 64th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1916.
  8. ^ Congressional Directory for the 105th Congress (1997-1998), Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1997, retrieved November 26, 2013
  9. ^ "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh Congress. Washington DC: House of Representatives. 1861.
  10. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1869). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the First Session of the Forty-First Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  11. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1878). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 45th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  12. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1882). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 47th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  13. ^ L.A. Coolidge (1897). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Fifth Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  14. ^ A.J. Halford (1909). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 60th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  15. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 75th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1938.
  16. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 90th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1968.
  17. ^ "Massachusetts". 1991-1992 Official Congressional Directory: 102nd Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1991.
  18. ^ "Election Center (2014)". CNN. Retrieved 2014-11-05.
  19. ^ "2014 Massachusetts House Election Results". www.politico.com. Retrieved 2014-11-05.
  20. ^ Galvin, William (2017). "Massachusetts Election Statistics". Secretary William Galvin. Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  21. ^ "Massachusetts 2018 U.S. House General Election Results". ballotpedia.org. Ballotpedia. 2018. Retrieved 15 November 2018.

Coordinates: 42°37′02″N 70°53′07″W / 42.61722°N 70.88528°W / 42.61722; -70.88528