AIBA World Boxing Championships

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The AIBA World Boxing Championships[1] and the AIBA Women's World Boxing Championships[2] are biennial amateur boxing competitions organised by the International Boxing Association (AIBA), which is the sport governing body. Alongside the Olympic boxing programme, it is the highest level of competition for the sport. The championships was first held in 1974 Havana, Cuba as a men's only event and the first women's championships was held over 25 years later in 2001. Formerly known as the World Amateur Boxing Championships and the Women's World Amateur Boxing Championships,[clarification needed] the men's and women's competitions are held separately and since 2006 the biennial championships have been held in alternating years.

The number of weight categories was reduced from twelve to eleven in 2003 with the removal of the light middleweight division (−71 kg). In 2011 the weight categories went down to ten with the removal of the featherweight division (−57 kg)

Men's editions[edit]

Cuban Felix Savon is the most successful boxer in the World Amateur Boxing Championships of all time having won 6 gold medals as a heavyweight.
Number Year Host Dates Venue
1 1974 Cuba Havana, Cuba August 17–30 Coliseo de la Ciudad Deportiva
2 1978 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Belgrade, Yugoslavia May 6–20
3 1982 West Germany Munich, West Germany May 4–15
4 1986 United States Reno, United States May 8–18 Reno-Sparks Convention Center
5 1989 Soviet Union Moscow, Soviet Union September 17 – October 1 Olympic Stadium
6 1991 Australia Sydney, Australia November 14–23
7 1993 Finland Tampere, Finland May 7–16 Tampere Ice Stadium
8 1995 Germany Berlin, Germany May 4–15 Deutschlandhalle
9 1997 Hungary Budapest, Hungary October 18–26
10 1999 United States Houston, United States August 15–29 George R. Brown Convention Center
11 2001 United Kingdom Belfast, United Kingdom June 3–10 Odyssey Arena
12 2003 Thailand Bangkok, Thailand July 6–13 Nimibutr Stadium
13 2005 China Mianyang, China November 13–20 Jiu Zhou Gymnasium
14 2007 United States Chicago, United States October 23 – November 3 UIC Pavilion
15 2009 Italy Milan, Italy September 1–12 Mediolanum Forum
16 2011 Azerbaijan Baku, Azerbaijan September 22 – October 10 Heydar Aliyev Sports
17 2013 Kazakhstan Almaty, Kazakhstan October 14–26 Baluan Sholak Sports Palace
18 2015 Qatar Doha, Qatar October 5–18 Ali Bin Hamad al-Attiyah Arena
19 2017 Germany Hamburg, Germany August 25 – September 3 Alsterdorfer Sporthalle
20 2019 Russia Sochi, Russia TBD
21 2021 India New Delhi, India TBD

All-time medal table (1974–2017)[edit]

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Cuba 76 34 25 135
2  Russia 23 21 21 65
3  United States 16 10 19 45
4  Soviet Union 15 11 17 43
5  Kazakhstan 11 12 17 40
6  Bulgaria 8 8 18 34
7  Romania 7 5 17 29
8  Uzbekistan 6 13 17 36
9  Ukraine 6 12 11 29
10  Azerbaijan 6 4 9 19
11  Italy 6 2 14 22
12  Germany 4 6 25 35
13  France 4 6 13 23
14  China 3 1 9 13
15  Hungary 3 1 6 10
16  Turkey 2 3 11 16
17  South Korea 2 3 8 13
18  Puerto Rico 2 1 3 6
19  East Germany 1 8 15 24
20  Yugoslavia 1 6 10 17
21  Mongolia 1 4 5 10
22  Ireland 1 3 9 13
 Poland 1 3 9 13
24  England 1 3 7 11
25  Thailand 1 3 5 9
26  Armenia 1 1 5 7
27  Brazil 1 1 4 6
 Georgia 1 1 4 6
29  Nigeria 1 1 3 5
30  Kenya 1 1 0 2
31  Morocco 1 0 2 3
32  Uganda 1 0 1 2
33  Venezuela 0 5 6 11
34  Finland 0 3 2 5
35  Belarus 0 2 6 8
36  North Korea 0 2 5 7
37  Philippines 0 2 3 5
38  Algeria 0 2 2 4
 Netherlands 0 2 2 4
40  Canada 0 1 4 5
41  Lithuania 0 1 3 4
42  Argentina 0 1 2 3
 Japan 0 1 2 3
 Wales 0 1 2 3
45  Croatia 0 1 1 2
46  West Germany 0 0 6 6
47  Egypt 0 0 5 5
48  Australia 0 0 4 4
 India 0 0 4 4
 Sweden 0 0 4 4
51  Czech Republic 0 0 3 3
 Tajikistan 0 0 3 3
53  Norway 0 0 2 2
 Slovakia 0 0 2 2
 Yugoslavia /
 Serbia and Montenegro
0 0 2 2
56  Cameroon 0 0 1 1
 Colombia 0 0 1 1
 Costa Rica 0 0 1 1
 Czechoslovakia 0 0 1 1
 Denmark 0 0 1 1
 Dominican Republic 0 0 1 1
 Ecuador 0 0 1 1
 Ghana 0 0 1 1
 Great Britain 0 0 1 1
 Mexico 0 0 1 1
 New Zealand 0 0 1 1
 Pakistan 0 0 1 1
 Panama 0 0 1 1
 Spain 0 0 1 1
Total 214 212 428 854

Multiple gold medalists[edit]

Boldface denotes active amateur boxers and highest medal count among all boxers (including these who not included in these tables) per type.

Rank Boxer Country Weights From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Félix Savón  Cuba 91 kg 1986 1999 6 1 - 7
2 Juan Hernández Sierra  Cuba 67 kg 1991 1999 4 - 1 5
3 Julio César La Cruz  Cuba 81 kg 2011 2017 4 - - 4
4 Lázaro Álvarez  Cuba 56 kg / 60 kg 2011 2017 3 1 - 4
Serafim Todorov  Bulgaria 54 kg / 57 kg 1989 1995 3 1 - 4
Zou Shiming  China 48 kg / 49 kg 2003 2011 3 1 - 4
7 Francisc Vaștag  Romania 67 kg / 71 kg 1989 1995 3 - 1 4
8 Roberto Balado  Cuba +91 kg 1989 1993 3 - - 3
Adolfo Horta  Cuba 54 kg / 57 kg / 60 kg 1978 1986 3 - - 3
Mario Kindelán  Cuba 60 kg 1999 2003 3 - - 3
Magomedrasul Majidov  Azerbaijan +91 kg 2011 2017 3 - - 3
Odlanier Solís  Cuba 91 kg / +91 kg 2001 2005 3 - - 3
Teófilo Stevenson  Cuba +81 kg / +91 kg 1974 1986 3 - - 3

Women's editions[edit]

Number Year Host Dates
1 2001 United States Scranton, United States November 24 – December 2
2 2002 Turkey Antalya, Turkey October 21–27
3 2005 Russia Podolsk, Russia September 26 – October 2
4 2006 India New Delhi, India November 18–23
5 2008 China Ningbo, China November 22–29
6 2010 Barbados Bridgetown, Barbados September 10–18
7 2012 China Qinhuangdao, China May 21 – June 3
8 2014 South Korea Jeju City, South Korea November 13–25
9 2016 Kazakhstan Astana, Kazakhstan May 19–27
10 2018 India New Delhi, India TBD
11 2019 Turkey Trabzon, Turkey TBD

All-time medal table (2001–2016)[edit]

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Russia 21 10 22 53
2  China 13 11 16 40
3  India 8 6 14 28
4  North Korea 7 7 7 21
5  Canada 7 2 16 25
6  United States 6 9 17 32
7  Turkey 5 5 12 22
8  Kazakhstan 5 3 6 14
9  Ireland 5 1 1 7
10  Italy 4 3 3 10
11  France 4 2 4 10
12  Hungary 3 5 11 19
13  Ukraine 3 5 10 18
14  Sweden 3 2 6 11
15  England 1 6 2 9
16  Romania 1 4 8 13
17  Poland 1 3 6 10
18  Philippines 1 2 7 10
19  Bulgaria 1 1 2 4
20  Belarus 1 1 0 2
21  Brazil 1 0 2 3
22  Great Britain 1 0 1 2
23  Panama 1 0 0 1
24  Norway 0 3 1 4
25  Argentina 0 2 2 4
26  Azerbaijan 0 2 1 3
27  Denmark 0 1 5 6
28  Netherlands 0 1 3 4
 Thailand 0 1 3 4
30  Australia 0 1 2 3
 Greece 0 1 2 3
32  Jamaica 0 1 0 1
  Switzerland 0 1 0 1
34  Finland 0 0 3 3
35  Egypt 0 0 2 2
36  Chinese Taipei 0 0 1 1
 Germany 0 0 1 1
 Japan 0 0 1 1
 Moldova 0 0 1 1
 New Zealand 0 0 1 1
 South Korea 0 0 1 1
 Tajikistan 0 0 1 1
 Tunisia 0 0 1 1
Total 103 102 205 410

Multiple gold medalists[edit]

Boldface denotes active boxers and highest medal count among all boxers (including these who not included in these tables) per type.

Rank Boxer Country Weights From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Mary Kom  India 48 kg / 45 kg / 46 kg 2001 2010 5 1 - 6
2 Katie Taylor  Ireland 60 kg 2006 2016 5 - 1 6
3 Irina Sinetskaya  Russia 67 kg / 66 kg / 80 kg / +81 kg 2001 2012 3 1 1 5
4 Mary Spencer  Canada 66 kg / 75 kg 2005 2010 3 - 1 4
5 Simona Galassi  Italy 51 kg / 50 kg 2001 2005 3 - - 3
Ren Cancan  China 52 kg / 51 kg 2008 2012 3 - - 3
7 Mária Kovács  Hungary 90 kg / 86 kg / 75 kg 2001 2010 2 2 1 5
8 Ariane Fortin-Brochu  Canada 70 kg / 75 kg 2005 2014 2 1 1 4
Anna Laurell  Sweden 75 kg 2001 2012 2 1 1 4
Sofya Ochigava  Russia 52 kg / 54 kg / 57 kg / 60 kg 2005 2012 2 1 1 4

See also[edit]

References[edit]