Voorhees Township, New Jersey

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Voorhees Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Voorhees
Voorhees highlighted in Camden County
Voorhees highlighted in Camden County
Census Bureau map of Voorhees Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Voorhees Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°50′55″N 74°57′13″W / 39.848539°N 74.953498°W / 39.848539; -74.953498Coordinates: 39°50′55″N 74°57′13″W / 39.848539°N 74.953498°W / 39.848539; -74.953498[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Camden
Incorporated March 1, 1899
Named for Foster McGowan Voorhees
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Michael R. Mignogna (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator Lawrence Spellman[4]
 • Clerk Jeanette Schelberg[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 11.644 sq mi (30.157 km2)
 • Land 11.492 sq mi (29.764 km2)
 • Water 0.152 sq mi (0.392 km2)  1.30%
Area rank 195th of 566 in state
6th of 37 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 112 ft (34 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 29,131
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 29,229
 • Rank 77th of 566 in state
6th of 37 in county[12]
 • Density 2,534.9/sq mi (978.7/km2)
 • Density rank 246th of 566 in state
28th of 37 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08043[13][14]
Area code(s) 856[15]
FIPS code 3400776220[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882153[1][18]
Website voorheesnj.com

Voorhees Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 29,131,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 1,005 (+3.6%) from the 28,126 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,567 (+14.5%) from the 24,559 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] Voorhees is a New Jersey suburb in the Greater Philadelphia Metropolitan Area.

Voorhees Township was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 1, 1899, from portions of Waterford Township. Portions of the township were taken on March 8, 1924, to form Gibbsboro.[20]

The township is named for Foster McGowan Voorhees, the Governor of New Jersey who authorized its creation.[21]

Geography[edit]

Voorhees Township is located at 39°50′55″N 74°57′13″W / 39.848539°N 74.953498°W / 39.848539; -74.953498 (39.848539,-74.953498). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 11.644 square miles (30.157 km2), of which, 11.492 square miles (29.764 km2) of it was land and 0.152 square miles (0.392 km2) of it (1.30%) was water.[1][2]

Echelon (with a 2010 population of 10,743[22]) is a census-designated place in the western part of the township between Cherry Hill and Gibbsboro.[23] The township includes the Ashland, Kirkwood, Kresson, Glendale, and Osage sections.[21]

Voorhees borders the Camden County communities of Berlin Township, Cherry Hill Township, Gibbsboro, Lindenwold, and Somerdale. To the east is Evesham Township in Burlington County.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 969
1910 1,174 21.2%
1920 1,305 11.2%
1930 1,405 7.7%
1940 1,450 3.2%
1950 1,823 25.7%
1960 3,784 107.6%
1970 6,214 64.2%
1980 12,919 107.9%
1990 24,559 90.1%
2000 28,126 14.5%
2010 29,131 3.6%
Est. 2013 29,229 [11][24] 0.3%
Population sources:
1900-2000[25] 1900-1920[26]
1900-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 29,131 people, 11,470 households, and 7,433 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,534.9 per square mile (978.7/km2). There were 12,260 housing units at an average density of 1,066.8 per square mile (411.9/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 71.77% (20,908) White, 8.70% (2,534) Black or African American, 0.15% (44) Native American, 16.13% (4,700) Asian, 0.04% (11) Pacific Islander, 0.84% (246) from other races, and 2.36% (688) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.43% (998) of the population.[8]

There were 11,470 households, of which 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.8% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.2% were non-families. 29.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.14.[8]

In the township, 22.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 24.4% from 25 to 44, 30.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.6 years. For every 100 females there were 90.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.8 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $82,146 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,405) and the median family income was $107,000 (+/- $4,910). Males had a median income of $72,430 (+/- $6,605) versus $51,322 (+/- $2,170) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $44,169 (+/- $2,717). About 4.0% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 12.1% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 28,126 people, 10,489 households, and 7,069 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,424.0 people per square mile (936.2/km²). There were 11,084 housing units at an average density of 955.2 per square mile (368.9/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 78.26% White, 8.00% African American, 0.14% Native American, 11.44% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.55% from other races, and 1.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.47% of the population.[30][31]

There were 10,489 households out of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.0% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.6% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.23.[30][31]

In the township the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 31.8% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 92.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the township was $68,402, and the median income for a family was $86,873. Males had a median income of $58,484 versus $38,897 for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,635. About 3.7% of families and 5.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.7% of those under age 18 and 11.1% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The Township of Voorhees is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government by a five-member Township Committee. Members are elected at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms in office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6] The Mayor and Deputy Mayors are chosen by the Township Committee from among its members during the Reorganization meeting each January.

As of 2014, the members of the Voorhees Township Committee are Mayor Michael R. Mignogna (D, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2014), Deputy Mayor Mario DiNatale (D, 2015), Deputy Mayor Harry A. Platt (D, 2014), Andrea "Andi" Ayes (D, 2015) and Michael Friedman (R, 2016).[33][34][35][36][37][38][39]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Voorhees Township is located in the 1st Congressional District[40] and is part of New Jersey's 6th state legislative district.[9][41][42]

New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Donald Norcross (D, Camden).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[44][45] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[46][47]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 6th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James Beach (D, Voorhees Township) and in the General Assembly by Louis Greenwald (D, Voorhees Township) and Pamela Rosen Lampitt (D, Cherry Hill).[48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, its seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with wither two or three seats coming up for election each year.[51] As of 2014, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. (Collingswood, term ends December 31, 2014)[52], Freeholder Deputy Director Edward McDonnell (Pennsauken Township, 2016)[53], Michelle Gentek (Gloucester Township, 2015)[54], Ian K. Leonard (Camden, 2015)[55], Scot N. McCray (Camden, 2014)[56], Jeffrey L. Nash (Cherry Hill, 2015)[57] and Carmen Rodriguez (Merchantville, 2016).[58][59][60] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk Joseph Ripa,[61] Sheriff Charles H. Billingham[62] and Surrogate Patricia Egan "Pat" Jones.[63]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 19,762 registered voters in Voorhees Township, of which 7,392 (37.4%) were registered as Democrats, 3,129 (15.8%) were registered as Republicans and 9,229 (46.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 12 voters registered to other parties.[64]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 61.1% of the vote here (9,028 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 35.3% (5,216 votes), with 14,768 ballots cast among the township's 19,553 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.5%.[65] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 57.5% of the vote here (7,835 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 40.2% (5,475 votes), with 13,628 ballots cast among the township's 18,325 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.4.[66]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 50.% of the vote here (4,126 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 44.2% (3,645 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 3.8% (315 votes), with 8,248 ballots cast among the township's 19,611 registered voters, yielding a 42.1% turnout.[67]

Education[edit]

Students in Kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Voorhees Township Public Schools. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's five schools had an enrollment of 3,173 students and 241.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.14:1.[68] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[69]) are four elementary schools ;mdash Edward T. Hamilton Elementary School[70] (grades K-5; 486 students), Kresson Elementary School[71] (K-5; 359), Osage Elementary School[72] (K-5; 647) and Signal Hill Elementary School[73] (PreK-5; 532) — and Voorhees Middle School[74] (1,149 in grades 6-8).[75][76] In 2003, Edward T. Hamilton Elementary School was recognized as a National Blue Ribbon School by the United States Department of Education, one of 233 selected nationwide.[77]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend the Eastern Camden County Regional High School District, a limited-purpose, public regional school district that serves students at Eastern Regional High School from the constituent communities of Berlin Borough, Gibbsboro and Voorhees Township.[78] As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's then two schools had an enrollment of 2,075 students and 138.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 15.04:1.[79]

Voorhees is also the home of two private schools. Kellman Brown Academy (formerly Harry B. Kellman Academy) is a private Jewish day school serving children aged 3 through 8th grade which had an enrollment of 206 students as of the 2011-12 school year.[80] The school was founded in 1958 in association with Congregation Beth El at Parkside in Camden and has been located in Voorhees independently since October 2008 as part of the Solomon Schechter Day School Association.[81]

Naudian Academy is a Montessori education program for children from preschool to kindergarten, located near Kresson Elementary School. Naudian Academy first opened in 1977.[82]

The largest branch of the Camden County Library is located in Voorhees. Officially named the M. Allan Vogelson Regional Branch, it was established in 1969.[83]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 119.81 miles (192.82 km) of roadways, of which 96.90 miles (155.95 km) were maintained by the municipality, 20.50 miles (32.99 km) by Camden County and 2.41 miles (3.88 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[84]

The only major highway that passes through Voorhees is Route 73 (Berlin-Kresson Road), which travels from the southern border with Berlin Township towards Evesham Township in Burlington County.[85] Interstate 295 and Route 70 provide access to nearby Philadelphia via Cherry Hill Township. Exit 32 of Interstate 295 is partially signed for Voorhees, though motorists can also use exits 29A (U.S. Route 30/Berlin), 31 (Woodcrest Station) or 36 (Route 73) to access parts of the township.

County Route 544 (Evesham Road) runs along the border with Cherry Hill on the north side of the township[86] and County Route 561 (Haddonfield-Berlin Road) clips the southwest corner of the township, from Berlin Township in the south, passes through Gibbsboro, reenters the township's northwest corner before heading into Cherry Hill.[87]

Public transportation[edit]

One station on the PATCO Speedline rail system, Ashland, is located within township limits.[88] The Woodcrest and Lindenwold stations are also easily accessible to many residents.

New Jersey Transit bus service is offered between the township and Philadelphia on the 403 route, with local service provided by the 451 and 459 routes.[89][90]

Corporate residents[edit]

New Jersey American Water, based in Voorhees Township, is the largest water utility in New Jersey, serving over two million people in 176 communities throughout the state. New Jersey American Water is a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water.[91]

Sports[edit]

Voorhees is the home of the Skate Zone, a training facility for the Philadelphia Flyers of the NHL.[92] Current and former players of either team often become residents of Voorhees.

The Philadelphia Soul of the Arena Football League practiced at the Coliseum in Voorhees before its closing.[93]

Notable people[edit]

People (and animals) who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Voorhees Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Administrator, Voorhees Township. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  5. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Voorhees Township. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 33.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Voorhees, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Voorhees township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Voorhees township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 12, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Voorhees, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Tavistock, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 6, 2013.
  16. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  18. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 12, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 109. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  21. ^ a b History of Voorhees, accessed May 8, 2007. "Over the years six "neighborhood" communities took root; Ashland, Glendale, Kirkwood, Kresson, Osage and Gibbsboro. Residents held strong loyalties to these sections of town, rather than to the town itself. One result of this divisive attitude was Gibbsboro’s secession from Voorhees in 1924.... Since Governor Foster McGowan Voorhees granted the request, the township was named in his honor."
  22. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Echelon CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 12, 2012.
  23. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed October 16, 2012.
  24. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
  25. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 12, 2012.
  26. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Voorhees township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Voorhees township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 12, 2012.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Voorhees township, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 4, 2012.
  33. ^ 2012 Committee Members, Voorhees Township. Accessed August 4, 2014. Note that the heading still says 2012 Committee Members as of date accessed.
  34. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Voorhees Township. Accessed August 4, 2014.
  35. ^ Dipento, Melissa. "Mignogna sworn in as Mayor of Voorhees", South Jersey Sun, January 3, 2012. Accessed June 4, 2012. "Now into his ninth year on the Voorhees Township Committee and his seventh year as mayor, Michael Mignogna was again sworn into the township’s highest office last night in front of a packed town hall. Mignogna was nominated by each member of the committee to serve again as mayor.... At the meeting, both Platt and Committeeman Mario DiNatale were appointed to share the role of deputy mayor."
  36. ^ Staff. "Camden County election results 2012", South Jersey Times, November 7, 2012. Accessed November 7, 2013.
  37. ^ Staff. "Voorhees incumbents keep their seats", The Voorhees Sun, November 14, 2011. Accessed November 7, 2013. "Both incumbents are keeping their seats on the Voorhees Township Committee. Democrats Michael Mignogna (who is mayor) and Harry Platt defeated Republicans Jody Raines and Ron Richards."
  38. ^ Sadler, Shannon. "Friedman pulls ahead for open seat on Voorhees Township Committee", The Voorhees Sun, November 5, 2013. Accessed November 7, 2013. "Friedman pulled ahead of his challenger, Democrat Kurt Stroemel on election night for the lone open seat on the Voorhees Township Committee.... While Friedman will rejoin the committee for another term, the election results do little to effect the township committee’s majority, with Mayor Michael Mignogna, Deputy Mayor Harry Platt, Deputy Mayor Mario DiNatale and Committeewoman Andi Ayes all being members of the Democratic Party."
  39. ^ Camden County General Election November 5, 2013, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed December 15, 2014.
  40. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  44. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  46. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  47. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 21, 2014.
  49. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  52. ^ Louis Cappelli, Jr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  53. ^ Edward McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder Michelle Gentek, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  55. ^ Ian K. Leonard, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  56. ^ Scot N. McCray, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  57. ^ Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  58. ^ Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  59. ^ Board of Freeholders, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
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  62. ^ Sheriff, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
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  64. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Camden, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  65. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  66. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  67. ^ 2009 Governor: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  68. ^ District information for Voorhees Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 4.
  69. ^ School Data for the Voorhees Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 4, 2014.
  70. ^ Edward T. Hamilton Elementary School, Voorhees Township Public Schools. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  71. ^ Kresson Elementary School, Voorhees Township Public Schools. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  72. ^ Osage Elementary School, Voorhees Township Public Schools. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  73. ^ Signal Hill Elementary School, Voorhees Township Public Schools. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  74. ^ Voorhees Middle School, Voorhees Township Public Schools. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  75. ^ Schools and School Administrators, Voorhees Township Public Schools. Accessed December 15, 2014.
  76. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the New Jersey School Directory for the Voorhees Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  77. ^ 2003 No Child Left Behind – Blue Ribbon Schools, United States Department of Education. Accessed August 4, 2014.
  78. ^ Eastern Regional High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 15, 2014. "Our district is a limited purpose public regional high school serving students in grades 9 through 12. The student population is multicultural and reflects the diversity of the three communities it serves: Berlin Borough, Gibbsboro and Voorhees Township."
  79. ^ District information for Eastern Camden County Regional, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 15, 2014.
  80. ^ Kellman Brown Academy, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 4, 2014.
  81. ^ Overview, Kellman Brown Academy. Accessed May 11, 2011.
  82. ^ About Us, Naudian Academy. Accessed May 11, 2011.
  83. ^ Voorhees Regional Branch, Camden County Library. Accessed August 20, 2013.
  84. ^ Camden County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 7, 2013.
  85. ^ Route 70 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2009. Accessed November 7, 2013.
  86. ^ County Route 544 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2007. Accessed November 7, 2013.
  87. ^ County Route 561 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2006. Accessed November 7, 2013.
  88. ^ Ashland Station, PATCO Speedline. Accessed November 7, 2013.
  89. ^ Camden County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed July 11, 2011.
  90. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed December 13, 2014.
  91. ^ Sorkin, Andrew Ross. "German Deal for U.S. Water Utility", The New York Times, September 17, 2001. Accessed July 11, 2011. "In the first deal in the United States since the terrorist attacks of last week, American Water Works of Voorhees, N.J., has agreed to be sold to RWE, a German utility, for more than $5 billion, executives close to the transaction said yesterday.... American Water Works, the largest publicly traded water utility in the nation, with annual revenue of $1.4 billion, has been acquisitive itself."
  92. ^ Staff. "FLYERS TAKE FIRST LOOK AT NEXT GENERATION MINUS THE MOSQUITOES, THE ROOKIES OPENED SUMMER \ CAMP IN VOORHEES. SOME ALREADY FELT AT HOME.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, August 15, 2000. Accessed July 11, 2011. "Amid renewed negotiations for a long-term contract for John LeClair, in which no progress was reported, the Flyers opened their rookie camp yesterday at the Flyers Skate Zone in Voorhees. They held their first official on-ice skate and practice at the new facility, and it was handled by Phantoms coach John Stevens and assistant coach Kjell Samuelsson."
  93. ^ Staff. "Philadelphia Soul Celebrate The Coliseum As New Practice Facility", Our Sports Central, February 29, 2008. Accessed November 7, 2013. "The Philadelphia Soul celebrated the move of its home of football operations to the Coliseum in Voorhees, NJ on Friday. A ribbon-cutting ceremony honored the facility as the Soul's new home for practice, training and coaching."
  94. ^ Staff. "Ron Anderson: Comfortable With His Shot and His Life", The Philadelphia Inquirer, April 27, 1991. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Married soon afterward Ron and Gail now live in Voorhees."
  95. ^ Friedman, Jackie. "Voorhees native Andrew Bailey living All-Star Game dream after finding success as Oakland A's reliever", The Star-Ledger, July 13, 2009. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Andrew Bailey and his father Bill drove toward the St. Louis arch during the 17th hour of a 38-hour trek from Voorhees, N.J., to Scottsdale, Ariz., on an especially bitter February morning."
  96. ^ Hank Baskett - Personal, Philadelphia Eagles, backed up by the Internet Archive as of September 14, 2010. Accessed March 12, 2013. "Single and resides in Voorhees, NJ"
  97. ^ Staff. "Democrats maintain grip on N.J. Assembly", The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 4, 2009. Accessed March 17, 2011. "In the Senate, Democrat James Beach - a Voorhees resident who served as Camden County clerk and freeholder - bested Republican Joseph Adolf..."
  98. ^ Staff. "Former Eagle Brooks in super situation with Steelers", Philadelphia Daily News, February 3, 2006. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Brooks still lives in the Philadelphia area. He and his family live in Voorhees N.J."
  99. ^ Staff. "Arrested Player Set for Cotton Bowl", The New York Times, December 20, 1996. Accessed June 4, 2012. "Canty, a junior from Voorhees, N.J., who has 54 tackles and a team-high five interceptions, was arrested early in the morning of Dec. 9 and pleaded not guilty on Wednesday."
  100. ^ Scher, Valerie. "Violinist's key: Just be a minor -| Gifted Sarah Chang still a teen to the core", San Diego Union-Tribune, October 31, 1995. Accessed March 17, 2011. "'I never play anything the same way twice,' she says by phone from her family's home in Voorhees, NJ."
  101. ^ Schapiro, Rich. "Prince Chunk's the (fat) cat's meow", Daily News, August 1, 2008. Accessed March 17, 2011. "The cat originally named Powder wound up at the Camden County Animal Shelter last week after his owner, Donna Oklatner, 65, of Voorhees, N.J., could no longer pay the bills."
  102. ^ Klein, Michael. "Buy Brian Dawkins' house", The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 16, 2009. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Seven-time Pro Bowler and former Eagle Brian Dawkins is with the Denver Broncos now, and so his house in Voorhees is on the market."
  103. ^ Schwartz, Erik. "Basketball tournament to honor slaying victim", Courier Post, September 15, 2005. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Also expected to appear and sign autographs are Pervis Ellison a Voorhees resident and YMCA member who was the top pick in the 1989 NBA draft."
  104. ^ a b Condran, Ed. "Paramore movin' up, just not movin' out", Bucks County Courier Times, February 25, 2006. Accessed March 17, 2011. "The Farro brothers who were born in Voorhees NJ met Williams four years ago."
  105. ^ Bracy, Aaron. "Phils may alter lineup -- in booth", Courier-Post, November 16, 2006. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Graham 41 of Voorhees has worked in the Phillies broadcast booth for the past eight years after starting his career with the Phillies in 1991..."
  106. ^ Assembly Member Louis D. Greenwald, Project Vote Smart. Accessed August 8, 2007.
  107. ^ Visiting Artist: Dana Hall, Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Accessed July 11, 2011. "Dana Hall was born in Brooklyn, New York, on March 13, 1969, and was raised in Philadelphia, where he was exposed to that city’s distinctive soul sounds, then at their peak of popularity with artists such as Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, the O’Jays, and Billy Paul. Through his parents, he also came in contact with Philadelphia’s jazz scene, and Jimmy Smith and Stanley Turrentine were among the musicians who visited the Hall household. He moved to Voorhees, New Jersey, at age 12 and began studying drums in junior high and oboe in high school."
  108. ^ Garber, Greg. "WITH ADRENALINE GONE, THROWING WILL BE A PAIN", Hartford Courant, November 25, 1998. Accessed March 17, 2011. "'I broke every finger on my passing hand at least once -- some of them twice and three times,' Jaworski said Tuesday night from his Voorhees, N.J., home. 'Let me tell you, it's awful hard to throw a football without all your fingers. Any other position out there, it doesn't matter. But for a quarterback, a broken finger is a killer.'"
  109. ^ Ron Jaworski speaker profile, Leading Authorities. Accessed March 17, 2011. "A proud family man, Ron Jaworski currently resides in Voorhees, New Jersey with his wife, Liz."
  110. ^ Mucha, Peter. "Philly’s Jill Kelley finally dishes about Petraeus scandal", The Philadelphia Inquirer, January 23, 2013. Accessed November 7, 2013. "Kelley, who grew up in Voorhees and Northeast Philadelphia, unwittingly helped bring the affair to light when she reported threatening e-mails to a friend in the FBI, which traced them to Broadwell."
  111. ^ Anderson, Dave. "Sports of The Times; MacT's Muscular Art: The Crucial Face-Off", The New York Times, May 22, 1995. Accessed August 20, 2013. "Despite their age difference, MacTavish and the 22-year-old Lindros are roommates on Flyer road trips, and the Flyer captain often hangs out at the MacTavish home in nearby Voorhees, N.J."
  112. ^ Ratliff, Ben. "Jimmy McGriff, 72, Jazz and Blues Organist", The New York Times, May 28, 2008. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Jimmy McGriff, who since the early 1960s was one of the most popular jazz and blues organists, died on Saturday in Voorhees, N.J. He was 72 and lived in Voorhees."
  113. ^ via Associated Press. "Jazz, blues organist Jimmy McGriff dies at 72", WPVI-TV, May 26, 2008. Accessed June 4, 2012. "McGriff's death on Saturday from multiple sclerosis was confirmed to The Associated Press on Monday by his wife, Margaret McGriff. At the time of his death, McGriff lived in the Philadelphia suburb of Voorhees, N.J."
  114. ^ Raoul Peck profile for the film Lumumba, Zeitgeist Films. Accessed March 17, 2011.
  115. ^ Glauber, Bill. "Marquette University's next president, Pilarz, is spirited leader", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, September 4, 2010. Accessed December 14, 2014. "One night, after dinner at the family's home in Voorhees, N.J., he broke the news to his parents, Joan and Joseph, and his younger sister, Susan."
  116. ^ Mary Previte's Biography, Project Vote Smart. Accessed November 7, 2013.
  117. ^ Panaccio, Tim. "Primeau finally deals with reality", The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 14, 2006. Accessed March 17, 2011. "The phone rang at Keith Primeau's house in Voorhees, N.J., on Sept. 6. Flyers general manager Bob Clarke said he wanted to meet the next day."
  118. ^ "Yale’s Ingalls Rink to host CWHL game featuring 14 Olympians, 26 National Team members Friday", Boxscore World Sportswire, November 25, 2011. Accessed November 7, 2013. "The Blades’ roster includes 10 2010 U.S. Olympic silver medalists (two of whom, Erika Lawler and Gigi Marvin, are currently injured): ... Molly Schaus (Voorhees, N.J./BC)"
  119. ^ Staff. "LADIES SET FOR COURT BATTLE \ CAMDEN CATHOLIC STANDS TALL EARLY ON", Philadelphia Daily News, December 26, 1997. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Chris St. Croix, a defensemen from Voorhees, was named to the US National Junior hockey team."
  120. ^ Kindred, David. "One amazing freshman", The Sporting News, August 27, 2001. Accessed March 17, 2011. "For three months, from October 6 past his 19th birthday on New Year's Day to January 5, Taliaferro underwent rehabilitation therapy at the Magee Rehabilitation Center in Philadelphia, 15 miles from his home in Voorhees, N.J."
  121. ^ Jeremy Thompson, Database Football. Accessed July 31, 2009.
  122. ^ English, Antonya. "Markings of a champion", St. Petersburg Times, August 31, 2007. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Trautwein, a low-key senior from Voorhees, N.J., had the tattoo done in April, and it has been a conversation piece ever since."
  123. ^ Mandel, Ken. "Phils pay respect to Vukovich", Major League Baseball, March 9, 2007. Accessed March 17, 2011. "A private funeral will be held Tuesday near Vukovich's Voorhees, N.J., home, and many members of the Phillies organization are planning to attend by traveling to Philadelphia on a chartered flight."
  124. ^ Toyelle Wilson, Baylor Lady Bears basketball. Accessed December 15, 2014. "A native of Voorhees, N.J., Wilson earned a bachelor's degree in business management from Manhattan College in 2003 and was a four-year letter winner for the women's basketball team."
  125. ^ Staff. "Ex-Ohio State gymnast Brandon Wynn makes U.S. national team", The Columbus Dispatch buckeyextra, August 20, 2013. Accessed November 7, 2013. "Former Ohio State gymnast Brandon Wynn retained his spot on the U.S. men’s national team with a fifth-place finish in the all-around standings at the P&G Championships in Hartford, Conn. Wynn, a native of Voorhees, N.J., will be among six Americans participating in the world championships in Antwerp, Belgium, from Sept. 30 to Oct. 6."

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