Adams County, Ohio

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Adams County
Adams County Courthouse
Official seal of Adams County
Map of Ohio highlighting Adams County
Location within the U.S. state of Ohio
Map of the United States highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 38°50′N 83°29′W / 38.84°N 83.48°W / 38.84; -83.48
Country United States
State Ohio
FoundedJuly 10, 1797[1]
Named forJohn Adams
SeatWest Union
Largest villageWest Union
Area
 • Total586 sq mi (1,520 km2)
 • Land584 sq mi (1,510 km2)
 • Water2.4 sq mi (6 km2)  0.4%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total27,477
 • Density47/sq mi (18/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district2nd
Websiteadamscountyoh.gov

Adams County is a county in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 27,477.[2] Its county seat is West Union.[3] The county is named after John Adams, the second President of the United States.[4]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 586 square miles (1,520 km2), of which 584 square miles (1,510 km2) is land and 2.4 square miles (6.2 km2) (0.4%) is water.[5] It includes many parks and preserves, including one of Ohio's greatest archeological wonders, the Serpent Mound at the Serpent Mound State Memorial in Locust Grove. Serpent Mound lends its name to the Serpent Mound crater, the eroded remnant of a huge ancient meteorite impact crater. Other areas of note include parks and natural areas like The Edge of Appalachia Preserve, Shawnee State Park, Adams Lake State Park and Robert H. Whipple State Nature Preserve.[6]

Adjacent counties[edit]

State protected areas[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18003,432
18109,434174.9%
182010,40610.3%
183012,28118.0%
184013,1837.3%
185018,88343.2%
186020,3097.6%
187020,7502.2%
188024,00515.7%
189026,0938.7%
190026,3280.9%
191024,755−6.0%
192022,403−9.5%
193020,381−9.0%
194021,7056.5%
195020,499−5.6%
196019,982−2.5%
197018,957−5.1%
198024,32828.3%
199025,3714.3%
200027,3307.7%
201028,5504.5%
202027,477−3.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]
1790-1960[8] 1900-1990[9]
1990-2000[10] 2020 [11]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[12] of 2000, 27,330 people, 10,501 households, and 7,613 families resided in the county. The population density was 47 people per square mile (18/km2). There were 11,822 housing units at an average density of 20 per square mile (8/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.77% White, 0.18% Black or African American, 0.68% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.11% from other races, and 1.10% from two or more races. 0.64% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 38.5% were of American, 19.8% German, 11.7% Irish and 8.9% English ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 10,501 households, out of which 34.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.10% were married couples living together, 10.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.50% were non-families. 24.00% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.40% under the age of 18, 8.70% from 18 to 24, 28.20% from 25 to 44, 23.40% from 45 to 64, and 13.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 96.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,315, and the median income for a family was $34,714. Males had a median income of $30,000 versus $20,433 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,515. About 12.80% of families and 17.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.30% of those under age 18 and 16.00% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, 28,550 people, 11,147 households, and 7,793 families resided in the county.[13] The population density was 48.9 inhabitants per square mile (18.9/km2). There were 12,978 housing units at an average density of 22.2 per square mile (8.6/km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 97.7% white, 0.4% American Indian, 0.3% black or African American, 0.1% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.9% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 17.6% were German, 16.5% were American, 15.3% were Irish, and 9.8% were English.[15]

Of the 11,147 households, 33.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.2% were married couples living together, 12.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.1% were non-families, and 25.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.01. The median age was 39.6 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $32,791 and the median income for a family was $40,305. Males had a median income of $37,277 versus $25,746 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,693. About 18.8% of families and 23.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.0% of those under age 18 and 16.8% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Economy[edit]

The economy of Adams County employs 10,100 people. Its largest industries are manufacturing (1,774 people), retail trade (1,618 people), and health care and social assistance (1,599 people), and the highest paying industries are utilities ($69,063), and finance and insurance ($56,938).[17] A 2019 report identified Adams County as the poorest in Ohio with a 23.8% poverty rate and median household income of $36,320 ($16,000 less than the state average). The county also has the state's highest unemployment rate at 6.8%. Poor economic conditions led to a 2.1% decrease in the county's population during the previous five years.[18]

Politics[edit]

Prior to 1936, Adams County was a swing county in presidential elections, holding bellwether status from 1896 to 1932. From 1936 on, the county has become strongly Republican and failed to back Republican candidates only in 1964 and 1976 since then, which also enabled it to regain bellwether status from 1964 to 1988.

United States presidential election results for Adams County, Ohio[19]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 9,870 81.27% 2,156 17.75% 119 0.98%
2016 8,659 75.88% 2,326 20.38% 427 3.74%
2012 6,865 61.75% 3,976 35.76% 277 2.49%
2008 6,914 60.57% 4,170 36.53% 330 2.89%
2004 7,653 63.78% 4,281 35.67% 66 0.55%
2000 6,380 62.34% 3,581 34.99% 274 2.68%
1996 4,763 45.88% 4,317 41.59% 1,301 12.53%
1992 4,722 43.89% 3,998 37.16% 2,038 18.94%
1988 5,916 60.71% 3,740 38.38% 88 0.90%
1984 6,113 62.83% 3,534 36.32% 82 0.84%
1980 5,336 53.75% 4,161 41.91% 431 4.34%
1976 4,197 47.80% 4,450 50.68% 133 1.51%
1972 4,980 63.18% 2,709 34.37% 193 2.45%
1968 3,973 51.54% 2,685 34.83% 1,050 13.62%
1964 3,702 42.52% 5,005 57.48% 0 0.00%
1960 5,996 60.59% 3,900 39.41% 0 0.00%
1956 5,637 59.14% 3,894 40.86% 0 0.00%
1952 5,648 58.93% 3,937 41.07% 0 0.00%
1948 5,103 54.24% 4,293 45.63% 12 0.13%
1944 5,590 58.30% 3,998 41.70% 0 0.00%
1940 6,180 55.24% 5,007 44.76% 0 0.00%
1936 5,910 50.21% 5,832 49.55% 28 0.24%
1932 4,857 44.43% 5,909 54.06% 165 1.51%
1928 5,665 65.23% 3,000 34.54% 20 0.23%
1924 4,315 52.46% 3,762 45.73% 149 1.81%
1920 4,974 54.07% 4,194 45.59% 31 0.34%
1916 2,819 48.21% 2,887 49.38% 141 2.41%
1912 1,863 38.03% 2,279 46.52% 757 15.45%
1908 3,432 52.11% 3,048 46.28% 106 1.61%
1904 3,252 51.98% 2,796 44.69% 208 3.32%
1900 3,535 51.81% 3,169 46.45% 119 1.74%
1896 3,338 50.13% 3,248 48.78% 73 1.10%
1892 2,903 48.44% 2,832 47.26% 258 4.31%
1888 2,870 47.71% 3,022 50.24% 123 2.04%
1884 2,833 49.05% 2,886 49.97% 57 0.99%
1880 2,563 48.39% 2,725 51.44% 9 0.17%
1876 2,141 45.47% 2,546 54.07% 22 0.47%
1872 1,877 48.63% 1,972 51.09% 11 0.28%
1868 2,044 47.63% 2,247 52.37% 0 0.00%
1864 2,094 51.99% 1,934 48.01% 0 0.00%
1860 1,667 43.33% 2,010 52.25% 170 4.42%
1856 1,407 40.49% 1,790 51.51% 278 8.00%


Government[edit]

Adams County has a three-member Board of County Commissioners who oversee the various County departments, similar to all but two of the 88 Ohio counties. Adams County's elected commissioners are: Ty Pell, Diane Ward, and Barbara Moore.[20]

Library[edit]

The Adams County Public Library serves the communities of Adams County, Ohio from its administrative location in Peebles and branches in Manchester, West Union, and Seaman.

In 2005, the library system loaned more than 264,000 items to its 14,000 cardholders. Total holdings (as of 2005) were over 101,000 volumes with over 250 periodical subscriptions.[21]

Hospital[edit]

Adams County is served by the Adams County Regional Medical Center near Seaman. The hospital was previously known as Adams County Hospital, and was in West Union. It was renamed and relocated to Seaman, and is easily accessible from the Appalachian Highway.

Communities[edit]

Map of Adams County, Ohio With Municipal and Township Labels

Villages[edit]

Townships[edit]

https://web.archive.org/web/20160715023447/http://www.ohiotownships.org/township-websites

Census-designated places[edit]

Other unincorporated communities[edit]

Places of interest[edit]

  • Great Serpent Mound
  • Counterfeit House in the Manchester, OH area, the only home constructed for the purposes of counterfeiting U.S. currency[22]
  • Brushcreek Motorsports Complex[23]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Adams County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 21, 2007. Retrieved April 28, 2007.
  2. ^ 2020 census
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Taylor, William Alexander (1899). Ohio Statesmen and Annals of Progress. Press of the Westbote Company. p. 243.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  6. ^ Volkman, Claire. "The 10 Best Midwest Foliage Drives to Leaf Peep Like a Champ". iExplore.com. Inside-Out Media. Retrieved September 21, 2016.
  7. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  8. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  9. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  10. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  11. ^ 2020 census
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  17. ^ "Adams County Economic Data". Data USA. Retrieved November 21, 2019.
  18. ^ Stebbins, Samuel. "Poorest counties in the US: A state-by-state look at where median household income is low". USA Today. Retrieved November 21, 2019.
  19. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  20. ^ "Adams County Commissioners". Adams County Ohio Government Portal. Archived from the original on April 30, 2015. Retrieved March 21, 2019.
  21. ^ "2005 Ohio Public Library Statistics:Statistics by County and Town". State Library of Ohio. Archived from the original on September 24, 2006. Retrieved November 6, 2006.
  22. ^ Homren, Wayne. "E-Sylum v11n07 - Article #28". www.coinbooks.org. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  23. ^ "Brushcreek Motorsports Complex » Peebles, OH". www.brushcreekmotorsports.com. Retrieved May 1, 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°50′N 83°29′W / 38.84°N 83.48°W / 38.84; -83.48