Monroe County, Ohio

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Monroe County, Ohio
Monroe County Courthouse, Woodsfield.jpg
Monroe County Courthouse
Seal of Monroe County, Ohio
Seal
Map of Ohio highlighting Monroe County
Location in the U.S. state of Ohio
Map of the United States highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Founded March 1, 1815
Named for James Monroe
Seat Woodsfield
Largest village Woodsfield
Area
 • Total 457 sq mi (1,184 km2)
 • Land 456 sq mi (1,181 km2)
 • Water 1.7 sq mi (4 km2), 0.4%
Population
 • (2010) 14,642
 • Density 32/sq mi (12/km²)
Congressional district 6th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.monroecountyohio.net

Monroe County is a county located on the eastern border of the U.S. state of Ohio, across the Ohio River from West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,642,[1] making it the second-least populous county in Ohio. Its county seat is Woodsfield.[2] The county was created in 1813 and later organized in 1815.[3]

History[edit]

Monroe County was formed on January 28, 1813 from portions of Belmont, Guernsey and Washington counties. It was named after James Monroe, the U.S. Secretary of State when the county was formed, and later fifth President of the United States.[4] When organized, the county's eastern border was with the state of Virginia. This portion of the state seceded from Virginia during the American Civil War, being admitted to the Union as the state of West Virginia. The largely rural county reached its peak of population in the 19th century, before urbanization drew people into and near cities for work and other opportunities. It is still a center of Amish population and farms.

On or about December 20, 2011, Exxon Mobil Corp., a New Jersey petroleum company, via its subsidiary XTO Energy, acquired 20,056 acres of Monroe County Utica Shale gas leases from Beck Energy.[5]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 457 square miles (1,180 km2), of which 456 square miles (1,180 km2) is land and 1.7 square miles (4.4 km2) (0.4%) is water.[6] It is bordered by the Ohio River to the east. The terrain is hilly in this area, with waterways cutting through some hills of the Appalachian Plateau, which extends from Lake Erie to the Ohio River, which flows southwest to the south of this county.

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1820 4,645
1830 8,768 88.8%
1840 18,521 111.2%
1850 28,351 53.1%
1860 25,741 −9.2%
1870 25,779 0.1%
1880 26,496 2.8%
1890 25,175 −5.0%
1900 27,031 7.4%
1910 24,244 −10.3%
1920 20,660 −14.8%
1930 18,426 −10.8%
1940 18,641 1.2%
1950 15,362 −17.6%
1960 15,268 −0.6%
1970 15,739 3.1%
1980 17,382 10.4%
1990 15,497 −10.8%
2000 15,180 −2.0%
2010 14,642 −3.5%
Est. 2016 14,210 [7] −3.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2013[1]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 15,180 people, 6,021 households, and 4,413 families residing in the county. The population density was 33 people per square mile (13/km²). There were 7,212 housing units at an average density of 16 per square mile (6/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.72% White, 0.26% Black or African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.11% from other races, and 0.67% from two or more races. 0.41% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 6,021 households out of which 29.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.70% were married couples living together, 8.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.70% were non-families. 24.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.60% under the age of 18, 7.10% from 18 to 24, 25.90% from 25 to 44, 27.20% from 45 to 64, and 16.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 97.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,467, and the median income for a family was $36,297. Males had a median income of $33,308 versus $19,628 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,096. About 11.00% of families and 13.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.30% of those under age 18 and 11.40% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 14,642 people, 6,065 households, and 4,183 families residing in the county.[13] The population density was 32.1 inhabitants per square mile (12.4/km2). There were 7,567 housing units at an average density of 16.6 per square mile (6.4/km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 98.1% white, 0.4% black or African American, 0.1% Asian, 0.1% American Indian, 0.1% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.4% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 34.8% were German, 14.5% were Irish, 10.6% were English, and 9.6% were American.[15]

Of the 6,065 households, 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.0% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.0% were non-families, and 27.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.87. The median age was 44.7 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $37,030 and the median income for a family was $43,261. Males had a median income of $39,261 versus $24,922 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,738. About 12.3% of families and 17.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.7% of those under age 18 and 12.3% of those age 65 or over.[16]

Politics[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[17]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 71.0% 4,868 24.3% 1,662 4.7% 323
2012 52.3% 3,548 44.8% 3,035 2.9% 199
2008 43.9% 3,066 53.1% 3,705 3.0% 211
2004 44.3% 3,424 54.9% 4,243 0.8% 62
2000 44.2% 3,145 50.7% 3,605 5.1% 365
1996 26.6% 1,856 56.2% 3,914 17.2% 1,197
1992 24.0% 1,823 55.8% 4,235 20.2% 1,533
1988 37.2% 2,557 62.1% 4,269 0.7% 48
1984 47.3% 3,302 51.8% 3,611 0.9% 65
1980 45.0% 2,870 49.7% 3,166 5.3% 337
1976 38.3% 2,728 60.2% 4,296 1.5% 108
1972 59.1% 3,721 39.5% 2,483 1.4% 88
1968 42.3% 2,686 48.9% 3,105 8.9% 563
1964 28.9% 1,944 71.1% 4,776
1960 56.6% 4,106 43.4% 3,144
1956 59.2% 3,738 40.8% 2,578
1952 52.1% 3,493 47.9% 3,213
1948 39.9% 2,574 60.0% 3,873 0.1% 7
1944 50.3% 3,617 49.7% 3,574
1940 52.3% 4,534 47.7% 4,138
1936 36.9% 3,211 61.6% 5,368 1.5% 130
1932 34.0% 2,767 64.6% 5,263 1.4% 116
1928 60.7% 4,287 38.7% 2,729 0.6% 43
1924 40.6% 2,674 56.8% 3,742 2.6% 173
1920 41.9% 2,825 57.3% 3,861 0.7% 50
1916 30.6% 1,504 67.6% 3,322 1.8% 87
1912 21.8% 1,055 66.1% 3,199 12.1% 587
1908 32.7% 1,974 65.7% 3,961 1.6% 95
1904 40.2% 2,222 57.3% 3,169 2.5% 140
1900 33.3% 2,103 65.7% 4,143 1.0% 64
1896 32.1% 2,001 67.0% 4,180 0.9% 58
1892 29.1% 1,630 68.5% 3,838 2.4% 137
1888 29.0% 1,621 69.6% 3,886 1.3% 74
1884 29.0% 1,645 70.7% 4,010 0.4% 20
1880 29.3% 1,600 68.7% 3,751 2.0% 109
1876 27.7% 1,462 72.1% 3,805 0.2% 10
1872 30.7% 1,307 67.7% 2,878 1.6% 67

Monroe County voted Democratic in every election from 1976 until 2008; in 2012 it voted Republican for the first time in 40 years and in 2016 it took a sharp turn to the right; voting for Donald Trump by a large margin. In the 2014 gubernatorial election, Monroe was one of two counties to vote for Democrat Ed FitzGerald over Republican John Kasich (along with Athens County).

Government[edit]

Monroe County has three County Commissioners who oversee the various County departments, similar to 85 of the other 88 Ohio counties. Current Commissioners are: Mick Schumacher (R), Tim Price (D), and Carl Davis (D).[18]

Monroe County is served by the Monroe County District Library from its administrative offices in Woodsfield, Ohio; it also offers a bookmobile service.

In 2005, the library loaned more than 141,000 items to its 6,000 cardholders. Total holding are over 64,000 volumes with over 140 periodical subscriptions.[19] This library is a member of the SOLO Regional Library System.

Education[edit]

Monroe County contains the following schools through the Switzerland of Ohio Local School District:

Communities[edit]

Map of Monroe County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

Villages[edit]

Townships[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 9, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Ohio: Individual County Chronologies". Ohio Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. Retrieved February 14, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Monroe County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. Archived from the original on November 12, 2013. Retrieved 2007-04-28. 
  5. ^ [1]]
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved February 9, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 9, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 9, 2015. 
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 9, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 9, 2015. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27. 
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27. 
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27. 
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27. 
  17. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  18. ^ "Government-Monroe County Commissioners". Monroe County Ohio Homepage. Retrieved December 12, 2016. 
  19. ^ "2005 Ohio Public Library Statistics:Statistics by County and Town". State Library of Ohio. Archived from the original on September 24, 2006. Retrieved October 3, 2006. 
  20. ^ THE BLUE BOOK OF THE STATE OF WISCONSIN. 1889. p. 508. 
  21. ^ "Montana Governor Samuel Vernon Stewart". National Governors Association. Retrieved October 10, 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Thomas William Lewis, History of Southeastern Ohio and the Muskingum Valley, 1788-1928. In Three Volumes. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1928.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°44′N 81°05′W / 39.73°N 81.08°W / 39.73; -81.08