Mahoning County, Ohio

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mahoning County
Mahoning County Courthouse
Official seal of Mahoning County
Map of Ohio highlighting Mahoning County
Location within the U.S. state of Ohio
Map of the United States highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 41°01′N 80°46′W / 41.02°N 80.77°W / 41.02; -80.77
Country United States
State Ohio
FoundedMarch 1, 1846
Named forA Native American word for salt lick
SeatYoungstown
Largest cityYoungstown
Area
 • Total425 sq mi (1,100 km2)
 • Land412 sq mi (1,070 km2)
 • Water14 sq mi (40 km2)  3.2%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total228,614
 • Estimate 
(2021)
226,762 Decrease
 • Density540/sq mi (210/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts6th, 13th
Websitewww.mahoningcountyoh.gov

Mahoning County is a county in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2020 census, the population was 228,614.[1] Its county seat and largest city is Youngstown.[2] The county is named after the Mahoning River and was formed on March 1, 1846; the 83rd county in Ohio.[3][4] Until 1846, the area that is now Mahoning County was part of Trumbull and Columbiana counties, when the counties in the area were redefined and Mahoning County emerged as a new county.[5] Mahoning County is part of the Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, OH-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

In the year 1600, Mahoning County was likely divided between two Nations of Native peoples- the Erie in the east [6] and the Whittlesey Culture in the west.[7] It is unknown where the actual boundaries between these cultures lied, though the nearest confirmed Whittlesey settlement was at Cleveland and the nearest confirmed Erie settlement was just barely across the Ohio-PA border, in Ashtabula County. The Erie were an Iroquoian people who likely arrived sometime between the years 1100-1300 AD, after chasing out an older nation of "Mound Builders."[8] The Whittlesey were likely Algonquian, but lived in longhouses rather than the traditional Algonquian wigwams.

Following the Beaver Wars, when the Iroquois Confederacy declared war on many of the tribes of the Great Lakes region over several decades and destroyed them, new tribes moved into this area. The tribes who shared the resources of the Mahoning Valley included the Seneca, Lenape (Delaware), Shawnee, and Wyandot. The Seneca and Wyandot were Iroquoians, and the Lenape and Shawnee were Algonquians. As northeast Ohio later came to be under control of the settlers as part of the Western Reserve, all tribes were pushed further westward or southward, before eventually being removed from Ohio by the United States in the early-mid 1800s.

Some former known Native American sites that existed in Mahoning County include the council rock [9] and the North Benton burial mound.[10] Council Rock was where the Shawnee and Lenape were known to gather for collective holiday celebrations, religion ceremonies and political meetings and once sat in the center of Youngstown. Though the rock was moved long ago, it still rests in what is now Lincoln Park. The North Benton burial mound was once located on the outskirts of North Benton, Ohio and was removed by archeologists. It was attributed to the Hopewell Culture, but contained unique features, such as sculptures of constellations made of white rocks and clay laid out at ground level and a pit full of mixed human bones in one corner. It shared features with two other burial mounds found and excavated in Kent, OH and Warren, PA and represents a completely unique style of burial mound in Ohio.

Prior to its formation of a county in 1846, Mahoning County was a destination for a family of Huguenot refugees in the early 1800s.[11]

In the 1900s, Youngstown was a hub for the steel industry and for local mob groups, who gained their power through the liquor and gambling industries during prohibition, remaining a key safety issue for the region until the 70s. It was also the home to Warner Theatre, where the Warner Bros. film studio got its start and remained a hub for early film and television for decades. An extensive German community used to exist in the township of Berlin, until pressure to fully assimilate after the World Wars against Germany ended it. The Briar Hill Pizza was invented in the neighborhood of Briar Hill in Youngstown and is considered a local delicacy.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the county has an area of 425 square miles (1,100 km2), of which 412 square miles (1,070 km2) is land and 14 square miles (36 km2) (3.2%) is water.[12]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major Highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
185023,735
186025,8949.1%
187031,00119.7%
188042,87138.3%
189055,97930.6%
190070,13425.3%
1910116,15165.6%
1920186,31060.4%
1930236,14226.7%
1940240,2511.7%
1950257,6297.2%
1960300,48016.6%
1970303,4241.0%
1980289,487−4.6%
1990264,806−8.5%
2000257,555−2.7%
2010238,823−7.3%
2020228,614−4.3%
2021 (est.)226,762[13]−0.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[14]
1790-1960[15] 1900-1990[16]
1990-2000[17] 2010-2020[1]
A pyramid showing the age distribution of the county.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[18] of 2000, there were 257,555 people, 102,587 households, and 68,835 families living in the county. The population density was 620 people per square mile (239/km2). There were 111,762 housing units at an average density of 269 per square mile (104/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 81.04% White, 15.87% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.03% from other races, and 1.38% from two or more races. 2.97% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

93.1% spoke English, 2.6% Spanish, 1.0% Italian, and 0.5% Greek as their first language.[19]

There were 102,587 households, out of which 28.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.00% were married couples living together, 14.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.90% were non-families. 29.10% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.70% under the age of 18, 8.40% from 18 to 24, 26.40% from 25 to 44, 23.70% from 45 to 64, and 17.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 91.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,248, and the median income for a family was $44,185. Males had a median income of $36,313 versus $23,272 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,818. About 9.60% of families and 12.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.10% of those under age 18 and 8.70% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 census, there were 238,823 people, 98,712 households, and 62,676 families living in the county.[20] The population density was 580.2 inhabitants per square mile (224.0/km2). There were 111,833 housing units at an average density of 271.7 per square mile (104.9/km2).[21] The racial makeup of the county was 79.9% white, 15.7% black or African American, 0.7% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 1.4% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 4.7% of the population.[20] In terms of ancestry, 21.4% were German, 18.4% were Italian, 16.6% were Irish, 8.9% were English, and 4.2% were American.[22]

Of the 98,712 households, 27.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.7% were married couples living together, 15.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 36.5% were non-families, and 31.8% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.94. The median age was 42.9 years.[20]

The median income for a household in the county was $40,123 and the median income for a family was $52,489. Males had a median income of $44,516 versus $31,969 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,824. About 12.6% of families and 16.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.9% of those under age 18 and 10.0% of those age 65 or over.[23]

Economy[edit]

Top Employers[edit]

According to the county's 2019 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[24] the top employers in the county are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 Mercy Health 3,000
2 Youngstown City School District 1,791
3 Mahoning County 1,600
4 Youngstown State University 1,200
5 VXI Global Solutions 1,100
6 City of Youngstown 1,063
7 Infocision Management 1,050
8 Windsor House Assisted Living 850
9 Austintown Local School District 800
10 Akron Children's Hospital 800

Politics[edit]

2020 Presidential Election by Township and City
Biden:      60–70%      70–80%
Trump:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

Mahoning County is historically Democratic-leaning, voting for the Democratic presidential candidate in every election from 1976 through 2016. Between 1976 and 2012 Mahoning County voted Democratic by at least a margin of 17 percentage points for every election. In 2016, Hillary Clinton won the county over Donald Trump by 3.3 percent, the smallest margin since 1972; in 2012, Barack Obama carried the county over Mitt Romney by a solid 28.3 percent. However, in 2020, Donald Trump flipped the county Republican for the first time since Richard Nixon's national landslide victory in 1972, carrying it by a margin of 1.9 percentage points.

At the statewide level, Mahoning County generally votes Democratic as well. Since 1970, the county has only voted Republican three times at the gubernatorial level – in the landslide elections of 1994, 2014, and 2022.

Between 2012 and 2022, Mahoning County was split between Ohio's 13th Congressional District and Ohio's 6th Congressional District. After the 2020 redistricting cycle, the county was moved entirely into the 6th district, which is currently represented by Congressman Bill Johnson.

United States presidential election results for Mahoning County, Ohio[25]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 59,903 50.26% 57,641 48.36% 1,646 1.38%
2016 53,616 46.23% 57,381 49.48% 4,974 4.29%
2012 42,641 35.07% 77,059 63.38% 1,884 1.55%
2008 45,319 35.50% 79,173 62.02% 3,167 2.48%
2004 48,761 36.69% 83,194 62.60% 949 0.71%
2000 40,460 35.45% 69,212 60.65% 4,447 3.90%
1996 31,397 26.57% 72,716 61.53% 14,065 11.90%
1992 31,191 24.82% 64,731 51.52% 29,728 23.66%
1988 43,722 36.40% 75,524 62.87% 880 0.73%
1984 53,424 40.65% 76,514 58.21% 1,500 1.14%
1980 50,153 40.07% 63,677 50.88% 11,331 9.05%
1976 46,314 36.96% 75,837 60.53% 3,143 2.51%
1972 64,144 49.69% 62,428 48.36% 2,516 1.95%
1968 42,948 34.75% 68,433 55.38% 12,197 9.87%
1964 33,775 27.08% 90,934 72.92% 0 0.00%
1960 51,927 38.73% 82,143 61.27% 0 0.00%
1956 63,992 51.98% 59,126 48.02% 0 0.00%
1952 53,164 43.98% 67,722 56.02% 0 0.00%
1948 37,365 36.94% 62,468 61.76% 1,313 1.30%
1944 35,184 33.42% 70,102 66.58% 0 0.00%
1940 37,496 32.91% 76,441 67.09% 0 0.00%
1936 24,825 27.32% 64,886 71.41% 1,147 1.26%
1932 39,713 52.35% 33,139 43.68% 3,009 3.97%
1928 48,341 63.82% 26,928 35.55% 479 0.63%
1924 37,647 68.12% 9,335 16.89% 8,282 14.99%
1920 29,736 63.85% 14,941 32.08% 1,893 4.06%
1916 11,256 44.62% 13,013 51.59% 956 3.79%
1912 5,839 28.20% 6,838 33.03% 8,026 38.77%
1908 10,760 51.18% 9,312 44.29% 951 4.52%
1904 10,404 59.97% 4,436 25.57% 2,510 14.47%
1900 8,939 53.57% 7,402 44.36% 345 2.07%
1896 8,529 55.27% 6,772 43.88% 131 0.85%
1892 5,806 45.54% 6,358 49.87% 586 4.60%
1888 6,162 51.31% 5,337 44.44% 511 4.25%
1884 6,007 55.59% 4,432 41.01% 367 3.40%
1880 4,943 53.33% 4,044 43.63% 282 3.04%
1876 3,921 48.47% 3,691 45.62% 478 5.91%
1872 3,757 59.13% 2,518 39.63% 79 1.24%
1868 3,387 55.13% 2,757 44.87% 0 0.00%
1864 3,044 55.71% 2,420 44.29% 0 0.00%
1860 2,907 57.51% 1,990 39.37% 158 3.13%
1856 2,323 54.16% 1,937 45.16% 29 0.68%

Government[edit]

Mahoning County officials[edit]

Office Official Party
Commissioner David Ditzler Democratic
Commissioner Carol Rimedio-Righetti Democratic
Commissioner Anthony Traficanti Democratic
Auditor Ralph Meacham Republican
Clerk of Courts Anthony Vivo Democratic
Coroner David Kennedy Democratic
Engineer Patrick Ginnetti Democratic
Prosecuting Attorney Gina DeGenova Democratic
Recorder Noralynn Palermo Democratic
Sheriff Jerry Greene Democratic
Treasurer Daniel Yemma Democratic

Mahoning County judgeships[edit]

Court Judge Party
Court of Common Pleas Anthony M. D'Apolito Democratic
Court of Common Pleas Anthony Donofrio Democratic
Court of Common Pleas John M. Durkin Democratic
Court of Common Pleas R. Scott Krichbaum Republican
Court of Common Pleas Maureen A. Sweeney Republican
Court of Common Pleas Domestic Relations Court Beth A. Smith Democratic
Court of Common Pleas Juvenile Division Theresa F. Dellick Republican
Mahoning County Court #2 - Boardman Joseph M. Houser Republican
Mahoning County Court #3 - Sebring Joe Schiavoni Democratic
Mahoning County Court #4 - Austintown Scott D. Hunter Republican
Mahoning County Court #5 - Canfield Molly K. Johnson Republican
Campbell Municipal Court Patrick P. Cunning Democratic
Struthers Municipal Court Dominic R. Leone III Democratic
Youngstown Municipal Court Carla J. Baldwin Democratic
Youngstown Municipal Court Renee M. DiSalvo Republican
7th District Court of Appeals Cheryl L. Waite Democratic
7th District Court of Appeals Carol Ann Robb Republican
7th District Court of Appeals David A. D’Apolito Democratic
7th District Court of Appeals Mark A. Hanni Republican

Ohio House of Representatives[edit]

District Representative Party
58 Alessandro Cutrona Republican
59 Lauren McNally Democratic

Ohio State Senate[edit]

District Senator Party
33 Michael Rulli Republican

United States House of Representatives[edit]

District Representative Party
06 Bill Johnson Republican

United States Senate[edit]

Senator Party
Sherrod Brown Democratic
J. D. Vance Republican

Education[edit]

Colleges and universities[edit]

Community, junior, and technical colleges[edit]

Public school districts[edit]

School districts include:[26]

High schools[edit]

Communities[edit]

Map of Mahoning County, Ohio with municipal and township labels

Cities[edit]

Villages[edit]

Townships[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Population ranking[edit]

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2020 census of Mahoning County.[1]

* minority of municipality located in Mahoning County
county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Population (2010 Census) Municipal type
1 Youngstown 60,068 City
2 Austintown 29,594 CDP
3 Alliance* 21,672 City
4 Salem* 11,915 City
5 Struthers 10,063 City
6 Campbell 7,852 City
7 Canfield 7,699 City
8 Columbiana* 6,559 City
9 Sebring 4,191 Village
10 Mineral Ridge* 3,951 CDP
11 Poland 2,463 Village
12 Woodworth 1,784 CDP
13 New Middletown 1,507 Village
14 North Lima 1,369 CDP
15 Craig Beach 1,076 Village
16 Lowellville 996 Village
17 Beloit 903 Village
18 Washingtonville* 712 Village
19 Maple Ridge 667 CDP
20 Lake Milton 637 CDP
21 New Springfield 579 CDP
22 Damascus 418 CDP
23 Petersburg 405 CDP
24 East Alliance 268 CDP

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 29, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Mahoning County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 21, 2007. Retrieved April 28, 2007.
  4. ^ "Mahoning County - Ohio History Central". ohiohistorycentral.org. Retrieved January 17, 2023.
  5. ^ History of Mahoning County Archived February 22, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, Official county website.
  6. ^ Alvin M. Josephy, Jr., ed. (1961). The American Heritage Book of Indians. American Heritage Publishing Co., Inc. p. 197. LCCN 61-14871. [while the Iroquois were mopping up the Huron] ...the Erie... struck first in 1653. The next year [a counter-offensive] ...a victory which should have won the war on the spot, but ...two more years of fighting were required before the Erie, too, had been vanquished.
  7. ^ "Whittlesey Culture - Ohio History Central". ohiohistorycentral.org. Retrieved January 29, 2020.
  8. ^ Iroquois Book of Rites; Hale, Horatio; 1883
  9. ^ http://riversidecemeteryjournal.com/Places/Places/page9.html
  10. ^ The North Benton Mound: A Hopewell Site in Ohio; Magrath, Willis H.; American Antiquity, Vol. 1 pgs 40-46; 1945
  11. ^ Calvin, Claude (1945). The Calvin Families. University of Wisconsin. pp. 69–71.
  12. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  13. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021". Retrieved June 29, 2022.
  14. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  15. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  16. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  17. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 27, 2010. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  18. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  19. ^ "Data Center Results". Archived from the original on June 19, 2006. Retrieved August 10, 2013.
  20. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  21. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  22. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  23. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  24. ^ "Mahoning County, Ohio Comprehensive Annual Financial Report For Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2019". Retrieved June 27, 2021.
  25. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 2, 2018.
  26. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Mahoning County, OH" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 23, 2022. Retrieved July 23, 2022. - Text list
  27. ^ "TOWNSHIP WEBSITES | Ohio Township Association". Archived from the original on July 15, 2016.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°01′N 80°46′W / 41.02°N 80.77°W / 41.02; -80.77