Daniel S. Goldman

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Daniel Goldman
Daniel S. Goldman (2019).png
Born
Daniel Sachs Goldman

(1976-02-26) February 26, 1976 (age 45)
EducationYale University (BA)
Stanford University (JD)
Known forLead counsel for the Democrats during the Impeachment inquiry against Donald Trump.
Spouse(s)
(m. 2002; div. 2008)

Corinne Levy
(m. 2013)
Children5
FamilyRhoda Haas Goldman (grandmother)
Richard Goldman (grandfather)
Walter A. Haas (great-grandfather)

Daniel Sachs Goldman (born February 26, 1976)[1][2] is an American lawyer. He is a trial attorney and legal analyst serving as Congressional staff in the United States House of Representatives. He served as majority counsel in the first impeachment inquiry against Donald Trump[3][4] and staff counsel to House Managers in the subsequent impeachment of Donald Trump.

Early life and family[edit]

Goldman was born the son of Susan (née Sachs) and Richard W. Goldman.[5] His father was a federal prosecutor in Washington D.C. who died when Goldman was a child.[5] His paternal grandparents were Rhoda Haas Goldman and Richard Goldman;[5] his great-grandfather was Walter A. Haas, president of Levi Strauss & Co.; and his great great-grandfather was Abraham Haas the founder of the Smart & Final chain of food stores. His brother, Bill Goldman, died at the age of 38 in a plane crash.[6] Goldman is a graduate of the Sidwell Friends School in Washington D.C. where his mother previously served as chairman.[5] Goldman graduated with a B.A. from Yale University and a J.D. from Stanford School of Law.[5]

Career[edit]

From 2007 to 2017, Goldman was an assistant United States attorney in Southern District of New York under Preet Bharara.[3][7] He prosecuted Genovese crime family mobsters, including Fotios Geas, in 2011.[3] Goldman was also selected in 2017 to prosecute Billy Walters for insider trading because of what another assistant United States attorney, Brooke Cucinella, described as having "swagger as a trial lawyer".[3] After leaving the Southern District, Goldman became a legal analyst for NBC[8] and an opinion contributor to The Daily Beast.[7]

He was hired as general counsel for the House Intelligence Committee in March 2019 and later joined the impeachment inquiry against Donald Trump.[3] Goldman questioned witnesses on behalf of the majority during the public hearings in the Intelligence Committee. On December 9, 2019, he provided testimony at the public hearing of the House Judiciary Committee.[9]

Personal life[edit]

Goldman has married twice. In 2002, he married Olympic diver and Canada native, Anne Montminy;[1] they divorced in 2008 after having two children.[5] In 2013, he married Corinne Levy. They have had three children as of 2021.[5] On March 15, 2020, Goldman announced that he had tested positive for COVID-19 during that ongoing pandemic.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Weddings; Anne Montminy, Daniel Goldman". The New York Times. June 23, 2002.
  2. ^ United States Public Records, 1970-2009 (New York, 2008)
  3. ^ a b c d e Barrett, Devlin (November 12, 2019). "Democrats' impeachment lawyer cut his teeth prosecuting mobsters, Wall Street cheats". The Washington Post. Retrieved November 13, 2019. Cucinella said she requested Goldman to be on the trial team "because he has a bit of a swagger as a trial lawyer, and it’s a confidence that serves him well. In a courtroom, he’s incredibly effective."
  4. ^ Rogers, Alex (November 13, 2019). "Staff lawyers to take star role in first hearings on impeachment". CNN. Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "Daniel Goldman: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know". Heavy.com. November 2019.
  6. ^ "Bill Goldman, 38, historian, philanthropist and Levi Strauss heir, killed in plane crash". Jewish Telegraph Agency. July 14, 2017.
  7. ^ a b "Daniel S. Goldman". The Daily Beast. Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  8. ^ Madhani, Aamer (November 13, 2019). "Impeachment Hearing Attorneys Daniel Goldman, Steve Castor May Become Household Names". NBC 4 Washington.
  9. ^ Beauchamp, Zack (December 9, 2019). "The Trump-Ukraine scandal, explained in one minute". Vox. Retrieved December 9, 2019.
  10. ^ Health, P. M. N. (March 15, 2020). "U.S. Democrat impeachment lawyer tests positive for coronavirus | National Post". Retrieved March 15, 2020.