Honda Gyro

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Honda Gyro Canopy

The Honda Gyro is a family of small, three-wheeled motorcycles sold primarily in Japan, and often used for delivery or express service.

These vehicles are tilting three-wheelers. They combine a tricycle's stopped & low-speed stability with a leaning main-body for stability while turning at speed. They resemble a scooter with a small hinged rear pod containing the engine and two drive wheels. This particular variation was developed and patented by George Wallis of G. L. Wallis & Son in Surbiton, Surrey in 1966. It was first marketed in the failed BSA Ariel 3 of 1970, then licensed to Honda.[1][2][3][4]

Honda has built seven models with this configuration. The first Stream was introduced in 1981, followed closely by three other personal transport versions, the Joy, Just, and Road Fox. All were short-lived, but the cargo-oriented Gyro line begun in 1982 found a ready market, with all three variants still in production in 2015.[5][6][7][8]

These vehicles were all powered by a 49 cc two-stroke engine up until March 2008 when the two-stroke engines of Gyro X and Gyro Canopy were changed to four-stroke engines and the production of Gyro Up was discontinued.[citation needed]

Gyro variants[edit]

Honda Gyro X[edit]

Honda Gyro X, base model
Honda Gyro X
ManufacturerHonda Motor Company
Also calledNJ50, BB-TD01
Production1982–present
EngineTA01E 49 cc air-cooled 2-stroke
Power4.6 hp @ 7,500 rpm
Torque0.45 kg/m @ 7,000 rpm
TransmissionContinuously Variable Transmission
Tires3.50-10 41J, 130/90-6 53J
Wheelbase1.205 m
DimensionsL: 1.7 m
W: 0.640 m
H: 1.030 m (1.405 m)
Seat height0.735 m
Weight95 kg (93 kg) (dry)
100 kg (98 kg) (wet)
Fuel capacity5.0 L
Fuel consumption44.6 km/L @ 30 km/h (45.5 km/L @ 30 km/h)
Turning radius1.7 m

This first Gyro was introduced in October 1982. It has front and rear tie-down racks, small low-pressure tires combined with a limited slip differential for good performance on slick surfaces like snow and mud, and a "one push" parking brake. 135,226 were sold by May 2002.[9][10]

It is intended as an inexpensive vehicle. Honda's suggested retail price for the basic Gyro X in 2008 is ¥252,000, making it comparable with the simple 49cc Honda Zoomer scooter at ¥236,250.[11][12]

Honda's early marketing contains the Engrish acronym Great Your Recreation Original.[13]

Honda Gyro UP[edit]

Honda Gyro UP
Honda Gyro UP with accessory roof and box
ManufacturerHonda Motor Company
Also calledTB50, BB-TA01
Production1985–2008
EngineTA01E 49 cc air-cooled 2-stroke
Power5.0 hp @ 6,500 rpm
Torque0.57 kg/m @ 6,000 rpm
TransmissionContinuously Variable Transmission
Tires3.50-10 41J, 130/90-6 53J
Wheelbase1.240 m
DimensionsL: 1.760 m
W: 0.685 m
H: 1.010 m
Seat height0.755 m
Weight105 kg (dry)
110 kg (wet)
Fuel consumption46.0 km/L @ 30 km/h
Turning radius1.8 m

The Gyro UP was introduced in October 1985. It differs from the Gyro X by replacing the front and rear tie-down racks with a single heavy-duty baggage platform fixed directly to the rear engine pod, giving the appearance of a scooter pick-up truck. This platform has a rubber-mat loading area of 450 mm × 570mm that is rated for 30 kg. Honda claims it is sized for a twenty-bottle beer crate, a container that is roughly similar to the plastic milk crate common in other countries.[14][15][16][17][18]

The standard Gyro UP does not come with the roof-type fairing or box shown in the accompanying photograph. This fairing is an aftermarket modification by the company MRD.

Honda Gyro Canopy[edit]

Honda Gyro Canopy
Honda Gyro Canopy delivery vehicle
ManufacturerHonda Motor Company
Also calledTC50, BB-TA02
Production1990–current
EngineTA01E 49 cc air-cooled 4-stroke
Power4.6 hp @ 7.500 rpm
Torque0.45 kg/m @ 7,000 rpm
TransmissionContinuously Variable Transmission
Tires4.00-12 65J, 130/90-6 53J
Wheelbase1.410 m
DimensionsL: 1.895 m
W: 0.650 m
H: 1.690 m
Seat height0.700 m
Weight129 kg (dry)
136 kg (wet)
Fuel consumption41.9 km/L @ 30 km/h
Turning radius2.0 m

The Gyro Canopy was introduced in December 1990. It is distinguished by a roof-type fairing and a rear cargo box that is attached to the tilting main body. The front tire and brake are also enlarged to deal with this model's increased weight and slightly higher cargo platform. The 62 L cargo box is rated for 30 kg. By May 2002 62,600 Gyro Canopies had been sold.[19][20][21][22][23][24]. A fleet of specially modified Gyro Canopies is operated at Old Buckenham Airport [25]

Related vehicles[edit]

Honda Stream[edit]

Honda Stream
Honda Stream scooter2.png
ManufacturerHonda Motor Company
Also calledNV50, TB07
Production1981–1983
Engine49 cc air-cooled 2-stroke
Power3.8 hp @ 6,500 rpm
Torque0.46 kg-m @ 5,500 rpm
TransmissionContinuously Variable Transmission
Tires8-3.00-2PR
Wheelbase1.210 m
DimensionsL: 1.665 m
W: 0.570 m
H: 0.970 m
Seat height.658 m
Weight74 kg (dry)
79 kg (wet)
Fuel capacity4 L
Fuel consumption74 km/L @ 30 km/h
Turning radius1.7 m

The Stream was introduced in November 1981. It is the first of Honda's tilting three-wheelers, and has the primary features of the type. It is a scooter-like single occupant vehicle with an automatic transmission and a "one push" parking brake. It has a small hinged rear pod containing the 49 cc 2-stroke engine and two drive wheels powered through a limited slip differential.

The Stream was styled and priced as a luxury personal scooter. Honda's suggested retail price in 1981 was ¥198,000, compared to ¥114,000 for a 49cc Super Cub. Unlike the Cub, the Stream can only carry one rider and has no baggage rack. Its only cargo capacity is a small forward compartment rated for 5 kg, and a glovebox rated for 2 kg. It was discontinued in 1984.[26][27][28]

Honda Joy[edit]

Honda Joy
Honda Joy.jpg
ManufacturerHonda Motor Company
Also calledNM50
Production1983–1984
EngineTB08E 49 cc air-cooled 2-stroke
Power3.7 hp @ 6,000 rpm
Torque0.47 kg-m @ 5,000 rpm
Weight46 kg (dry)

The Joy was introduced in April 1983. It was a considerably less expensive vehicle than the Stream, being priced at only ¥99,800. It a personal transport vehicle, with only a small bicycle-style front basket and an equally small rear rack. The cargo-oriented Gyro X of the same year was twice as heavy and priced at ¥189,000. The Joy was discontinued in 1984.[29][30]

Honda Just[edit]

Honda Just
ManufacturerHonda Motor Company
Also calledNN50, A-TB09
Production1983
EngineTB08E 49 cc air-cooled 2-stroke
Power3.7 hp @ 6,000 rpm
Torque0.47 kg-m @ 5,000 rpm
Transmission2-speed automatic transmission
Tires2.75-10-2PR/3.00-8-2PR
DimensionsL: 1.520 m
W: 0.620 m
H: 0.945 m
Weight53 kg (dry)
57 kg (wet)
Fuel capacity3.2 L
Fuel consumption80.0 km/L @ 30 km/h
Turning radius1.5 m

The Just was introduced in May 1983. It is largely the same vehicle as its Joy stablemate. It has slightly more styling, and was priced at ¥129,000. Instead of a bicycle-style front basket, it has a glove-box behind the legshield. It was discontinued before 1984.[31]

Honda Road Fox[edit]

Honda Road Fox
Honda Road Fox
ManufacturerHonda Motor Company
Also calledTG50, A-TB10
Production1984
EngineTB08E 49 cc air-cooled 2-stroke
Power4.0 hp @ 6,000 rpm
Torque0.49 kg-m @ 5,500 rpm
Transmission2-speed automatic transmission
Tires3.00-8-2PR/4.50-6-2PR
DimensionsL: 1.595 m
W: 0.605 m
H: 0.915 m
Weight59 kg (dry)
63 kg (wet)
Fuel capacity3.7 L
Fuel consumption72 km/L @ 30 km/h

The Road Fox was introduced in July 1984. It is a stylistic departure in the series. The scooter-style plastic body panels are dispensed with, and instead the Road Fox has an exposed tube framework with rakish angles suggesting a beach-buggy/chopper look. It has motorcycle-style foot-pegs and no racks. It was discontinued before 1985.[32]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "BSA Ariel 3 History". Randolph Automotive. Archived from the original on 2008-03-15. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  2. ^ "BSA Ariel 3 History". Andrew Pattle Moped Archive. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  3. ^ "George Wallis patent". wikipatents.com. Archived from the original on 2008-03-14. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  4. ^ "George Wallis patent". wikipatents.com. Archived from the original on 2008-03-14. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  5. ^ "Timeline of all tilting Hondas". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  6. ^ "Gyro X product page". Honda. Archived from the original on 2008-02-29. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  7. ^ "Gyro UP product page". Honda. Archived from the original on 2008-02-27. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  8. ^ "Gyro Canopy product page". Honda. Archived from the original on 2008-02-26. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  9. ^ "Gyro X general description". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  10. ^ "Gyro X Sales May 2002". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  11. ^ "Gyro X pricing 2008". Honda. Archived from the original on 2008-02-29. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  12. ^ "Zoomer pricing 2008". Honda. Archived from the original on 2008-01-14. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  13. ^ "Gyro X acronym". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  14. ^ "Gyro UP general description 1985". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  15. ^ "Gyro UP general description 1991". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  16. ^ "Gyro UP general description 1993". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  17. ^ "Gyro UP general description 2000". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  18. ^ "Gyro UP baggage platform". Honda. Archived from the original on 2008-02-27. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  19. ^ "Gyro Canopy general description 1990". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  20. ^ "Gyro Canopy general description 1993". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  21. ^ "Gyro Canopy general description 1999". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  22. ^ "Gyro Canopy general description 2002". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  23. ^ "Gyro Canopy cargo box". Honda. Archived from the original on 2007-12-12. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  24. ^ "Gyro Canopy sales May 2002". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  25. ^ Malone, Jo (25 July 2018). "Meet the unsung heroes of a Norfolk airshow". Eastern Daily Press.
  26. ^ "Stream general description 1981". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  27. ^ "Stream pricing 1981". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  28. ^ "Super Cub pricing 1981". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  29. ^ "Joy general description 1983". Honda. Archived from the original on 2008-03-15. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  30. ^ "Gyro X price 1983". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  31. ^ "Just general description 1983". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
  32. ^ "Road Fox general description 1983". Honda. Retrieved 2008-03-03.
General

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