Petrie Terrace, Queensland

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Petrie Terrace
BrisbaneQueensland
StateLibQld 1 114044 Aerial view of Petrie Terrace, Brisbane, ca. 1925.jpg
Aerial view of Petrie Terrace, ca. 1925. Morrows biscuit factory (later to become Arnott Morrows) on River Road (renamed Coronation Drive in 1937), Milton, in the foreground.
Petrie Terrace is located in Queensland
Petrie Terrace
Petrie Terrace
Coordinates27°27′48″S 153°00′48″E / 27.4632°S 153.0132°E / -27.4632; 153.0132 (Petrie Terrace (centre of suburb))Coordinates: 27°27′48″S 153°00′48″E / 27.4632°S 153.0132°E / -27.4632; 153.0132 (Petrie Terrace (centre of suburb))
Population1,124 (2016 census)[1]
 • Density3,700/km2 (9,700/sq mi)
Postcode(s)4000
Area0.3 km2 (0.1 sq mi)
Time zoneAEST (UTC+10:00)
Location2.1 km (1 mi) W of Brisbane GPO
LGA(s)City of Brisbane
(Paddington Ward)[2]
State electorate(s)McConnel
Federal division(s)Brisbane
Suburbs around Petrie Terrace:
Paddington Red Hill Kelvin Grove
Spring Hill
Paddington Petrie Terrace Brisbane City
Milton Brisbane City Brisbane City

Petrie Terrace is an inner suburb in the City of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.[3] In the 2016 census, Petrie Terrace had a population of 1,124 people.[1]

Geography[edit]

The suburb is 2.1 kilometres (1.3 mi) by road west of the Brisbane General Post Office.[4] The precinct is bordered to the west by Hale Street and to the east by Countess Street. Its northern boundary is Musgrave Road and its southern is Milton Road and Upper Roma Street.[5]

History[edit]

The suburb takes its name from the road of the same name, which was in turn named after the pioneer Petrie family, headed by Andrew Petrie.[3]

Local people began to agitate for a school in February 1865, claiming at least 120 children would enrol.[6][7] Petrie Terrace State School opened in March 1868. In 1875 the school was split into Petrie Terrace Boys State School and Petrie Terrace Girls and Infants State School. In 1953 the schools were re-organised to form Petrie Terrace State School and Petrie Terrace Infants State School. Circa 1953-1954 opportunity classes were added to the Infant School for children with special needs. In 1960, another reorganisation of the schools took place, resulting in two schools Petrie Terrace State School (incorporating the infants) and the Petrie Terrace Opportunity School.[8]

In August 1865, the Queensland Government sold 31 town lots adjoining Petrie Terrace.[9]

In December 1865, "Lincoln Estate", being subdivisions of original portions 579, 580, 581, 597, 596 and 595 of the Parish of Enoggera, County of Stanley, in what is now known as Petrie Terrace, were advertised to be auctioned by Arthur Martin & Co.[10][11]

The Hotel LA

The Lord Alfred Hotel on Caxton Street opened in 1870. The hotel was conveniently positioned opposite the Old Victoria Barracks (built in Petrie Terrace between 1864–74) to attract the military personnel. It is now known as The Hotel LA.[citation needed]

St John the Baptist's Catholic School opened in March or April 1870.[12] It operated out of two cottages in Caxton Street roughly opposite the present St Thomas More Church (approx 27°27′48″S 153°00′42″E / 27.4634°S 153.0116°E / -27.4634; 153.0116 (St John the Baptist's Catholic School (former))). It was operated by the Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart. On opening, it had 52 students taught by Sister Clare Wright and Sister Francis de Sales Sullivan. The school closed in December 1879, due to Bishop James O'Quinn's expulsion of the Sisters from his diocese following disagreements with their leader Mary MacKillop.[12][13][14]

In December 1876, portion 296, North Brisbane made up of 12 allotments were advertised to be auctioned by Mr John Cameron. A map advertising the auction shows the allotments located in Jessie Street, Petrie Terrace.[15]

In February 1883, 50 allotments in what is now known as Petrie Terrace, and 45 allotments in what was known as Bishop's Hill, Petrie Terrace, were advertised to be auctioned by Arthur Martin & Co. A map advertising the auction shows the allotments located in Petrie Terrace, Petrie Terrace. The map inset shows close proximity to Normanby Station and the Normanby Hotel.[16][17]

Map displaying lots along Petrie Terrace and Bishop's Hill
Monster auction sale business & building sites, Petrie Terrace. Bishop's Hill, Petrie Terrace, 1883

The Baroona Hall (otherwise known as the Caxton Street Hall and formerly the United Brothers lodge) was constructed between 1883 and 1884 by the United Brothers Lodge, Manchester Unity Independent Order of Oddfellows. The lodge was established in 1873, to meet the needs of a large working class population without protection against injury, illness or other hardships. Baroona Hall is also associated with Brisbane architect, Richard Gailey as an example of his work and who designed many notable commercial and residential buildings including the Oddfellows Hall in Fortitude Valley and a Masonic Hall at Toowong. In 1918, the hall was leased to Isidor Josephson, a clothing manufacturer who built a substantial business which eventually extended to most other states. The hall was utilised by the lodge and the community for a number of years and the shops were continually occupied by a number of small businesses including bakers, stationers, hairdressers, bootmakers, drapers, and the Caxton Street Legal Services from 1976. A shop at the front was for many years, famously, the location of Tony Frangos, a traditional European style tailor. The Hall at the back was also an infamous live band venue where many Brisbane rock acts, as well as interstate acts played between 1975 and 1985. The building houses the "Velvet Cigar Strip Club".[18]

The Caxton Hotel on Caxton Street was originally built in 1884.[citation needed]

On Sunday 18 December 1864, a small building on Petrie Terrace was inaugurated for Baptist services and Sunday School.[19][20] In January 1895 a new Petrie Terrace Baptist church opened on the corner of Hale Street and Judge Street (27°27′51″S 153°00′40″E / 27.4643°S 153.0112°E / -27.4643; 153.0112 (Petrie Terrace Baptist Church)).[21][22] It was built behind the former church (built circa 1870) which faced Chapel Street. The 1895 church building is still extant but converted to a private residence; it is listed on the Brisbane Heritage Register.[23][24][25]

In 1936, Jean Trundle and Vic Hardgraves founded the Brisbane Amateur Theatres, an amateur theatre group. It was renamed Brisbane Arts Theatre in 1947. In June 1956, the group purchased "Dan's" second-hand shop on Petrie Terrace for £6,000 and built their theatre (also called the Brisbane Arts Theatre), making them the first theatre company in Brisbane to establish its own theatre. The theatre opened on 16 September 1961 with a performance of The Multi-Coloured Umbrella by Armidale playwright Barbara Mary Vernon. The theatre was badly damaged by a fire on 31 May 1964, reopening on 15 June 1965.[26]

On Sunday 3 June 1951, Archbishop James Duhig laid the foundation stone for the first Catholic Church in Petrie Terrace.[27][28][29] On Sunday 6 July 1952, Duhig returned to open and dedicate the new church to St Thomas More.[30] On 7 October 1973, Archbishop Francis Rush blessed the re-opening of the renovated and extended church building.[27][31]

In 1958, the Christadelphians built a hall on Petrie Terrace; the congregation (ecclesia) had formed in the 1880s but had used rented premises previously.[32]

In 1962, the Petrie Terrace Opportunity School was renamed the Baroona Opportunity School and in 1974, the Baroona Special School. It closed on 16 June 1995.[33]

In 2004, the Albert Park Flexible Learning Centre relocated into the former Baroona Special School buildings. The centre was originally opened in 1990 in Albert Park amphitheatre in the Brisbane CBD to provide schooling to homeless children. In 2000, it relocated to the Lady Bowen Building in Spring Hill, before the move to Petrie Terrace in 2004.[33][34]

In 2007-2008 the former Petrie Terrace Police Depot was converted to a retail precinct called The Barracks, which contains cinemas, restaurants, shops and offices with underground car parking. The heritage buildings have been incorporated in the development.[35] The Barracks has a walkway connection through to Roma Street railway station.

In the 2011 census, Petrie Terrace had a population of 1,183 people. 60.9% of people were born in Australia. The most common countries of birth were New Zealand 4.1%, England 3.3%, Ireland 1.7%, Scotland 1.2% and Italy 0.6%.[36]

In the 2016 census, Petrie Terrace had a population of 1,124 people.[1]

Heritage listings[edit]

Petrie Terrace has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Education[edit]

Albert Park Flexible Learning Centre is a Catholic secondary (11-12) school at 1 Hale Street (27°27′57″S 153°00′39″E / 27.4659°S 153.0108°E / -27.4659; 153.0108 (Albert Park Flexible Learning Centre)).[67] It provides secondary education through flexible formats to young men and women aged between 14 and 25 years, including those caring for young children.[34] In 2018, it had an enrolment of 104 students with 7 teachers (5.8 full-time equivalent) and 11 non-teaching staff (5.5 full-time equivalent).[68]

There are no mainstream schools in Petrie Terrace. The nearest government primary school is Petrie Terrace State School, which, despite its name, is within the neighbouring suburb of Paddington to the west. The nearest government secondary school is Kelvin Grove State College in neighbouring Kelvin Grove to the north.[5]

Amenities[edit]

St Thomas More Catholic Church is on the corner of Caxton Street and Chapel Street (27°27′50″S 153°00′42″E / 27.4639°S 153.0116°E / -27.4639; 153.0116 (St Thomas More Catholic Church)).[27] A weekly service is held in Italian.[13]

Brisbane Christadelphian Ecclesia (church) is at 134 Petrie Terrace (27°27′48″S 153°00′51″E / 27.4634°S 153.0142°E / -27.4634; 153.0142 (Brisbane Christadelpian Ecclesia)).[69][32]

Attractions[edit]

The Brisbane Arts Theatre is at 210 Petrie Terrace (27°27′42″S 153°00′51″E / 27.4616°S 153.0143°E / -27.4616; 153.0143 (Brisbane Arts Theatre)).[70]

Events[edit]

Since 1994 the Caxton Street Seafood and Wine Festival has been held on the Labour Day weekend.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Petrie Terrace (SSC)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 20 October 2018. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "Paddington Ward". Brisbane City Council. Brisbane City Council. Archived from the original on 12 March 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Petrie Terrace – suburb in City of Brisbane (entry 46582)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 18 July 2021.
  4. ^ Google (7 January 2022). "Brisbane GPO to Petrie Terrace" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  5. ^ a b "Queensland Globe". State of Queensland. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  6. ^ "TELEGRAPHIC". The Brisbane Courier. XIX (2, 191). Queensland, Australia. 6 February 1865. p. 2. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "TELEGRAPHIC". The Brisbane Courier. XXII (3, 115). Queensland, Australia. 5 October 1867. p. 4. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ Queensland Family History Society (2010), Queensland schools past and present (Version 1.01 ed.), Queensland Family History Society, ISBN 978-1-921171-26-0
  9. ^ "Classified Advertising". The Brisbane Courier. Queensland, Australia. 22 August 1865. p. 5. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 29 February 2020 – via Trove.
  10. ^ Lincoln Estate, 23 December 1865, hdl:10462/deriv/280858
  11. ^ "Classified Advertising". The Brisbane Courier. XX (2, 467). Queensland, Australia. 23 December 1865. p. 8. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 24 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ a b Queensland Family History Society (2010), Queensland schools past and present (Version 1.01 ed.), Queensland Family History Society, ISBN 978-1-921171-26-0
  13. ^ a b "St Thomas More, Petrie Terrace". Jubilee Catholic Parish. Archived from the original on 21 January 2021. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  14. ^ "We Are But Travellers Here: Mary MacKillop's Brisbane" (PDF). Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart. 24-25. Archived (PDF) from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  15. ^ "Plan of subdivision of portion 296, north Brisbane". State Library of Queensland. 18 December 1876. Retrieved 26 March 2019.
  16. ^ Monster auction sale business & building sites, Petrie Terrace. Bishop's Hill, Petrie Terrace, 10 February 1883, hdl:10462/deriv/18291
  17. ^ "Advertising". The Telegraph (3, 219). Queensland, Australia. 6 February 1883. p. 4. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 24 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  18. ^ a b "Baroona Labor Hall (entry 600277)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 19 June 2013.
  19. ^ "The Courier". The Brisbane Courier. XIX (2, 148). Queensland, Australia. 21 December 1864. p. 2. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  20. ^ "WEEKLY EPITOME". The Brisbane Courier. XIX (2, 151). Queensland, Australia. 24 December 1864. p. 5. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  21. ^ "Queensland Baptist churches by date of erection/opening". Baptist Church Archives Queensland. Archived from the original on 26 November 2021. Retrieved 29 November 2021.
  22. ^ "1895 Petrie Terrace". Baptist Church Archives Queensland. Archived from the original on 26 November 2021. Retrieved 29 November 2021.
  23. ^ "Baptist Church (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Archived from the original on 29 November 2021. Retrieved 29 November 2021.
  24. ^ "Petrie Terrace Baptist Church - Former". Churches Australia. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  25. ^ Blake, Thom. "Petrie Terrace Baptist Church". Queensland religious places database. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  26. ^ "History". Brisbane Arts Theatre. Archived from the original on 15 May 2021. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  27. ^ a b c "St Thomas More Catholic Church". Churches Australia. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  28. ^ ""On best sites"". The Courier-mail (4529). Queensland, Australia. 4 June 1951. p. 3. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  29. ^ "PRIMATE WILL BLESS STONE". Brisbane Telegraph. Queensland, Australia. 1 June 1951. p. 7 (CITY FINAL). Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  30. ^ "TAKEN TO PEOPLE Church growing". The Courier-mail (4869). Queensland, Australia. 7 July 1952. p. 5. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  31. ^ Blake, Thom. "St Thomas More Catholic Church". Queensland religious places database. Archived from the original on 7 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  32. ^ a b "Brisbane Christadelphian Ecclesia (Church)". Bible Education. Archived from the original on 27 January 2021. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  33. ^ a b c "Baroona Special School (entry 600278)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 19 June 2013.
  34. ^ a b "Albert Park FLC". EREA Flexible Schools Networks. Edmund Rice Education Australia. Archived from the original on 7 July 2021. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  35. ^ "History". The Barracks. Archived from the original on 3 January 2015. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  36. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "Petrie Terrace (SSC)". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 7 January 2022. Edit this at Wikidata
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  38. ^ "Sneyd's Shop". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  39. ^ "Udale's Shop House". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  40. ^ "Grigson's Cottage". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  41. ^ "Dyne's House". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  42. ^ "Dyne's House". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  43. ^ "Donaldson's Residence". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  44. ^ "La Boite Theatre (entry 602171)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 19 June 2013.
  45. ^ "Ford's Cottage". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  46. ^ "Baptist Church (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  47. ^ "Maxwell's Residence (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  48. ^ "Chase's House (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  49. ^ "Jackson's Granary (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  50. ^ "Substation No. 4". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  51. ^ "Petrie Terrace Police Depot (former) (entry 601894)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 19 June 2013.
  52. ^ "Lord Alfred Hotel". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  53. ^ "Victoria Barracks - Military Barracks". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  54. ^ "Hardgrave Park". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  55. ^ "Shawn". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  56. ^ "Paslewydd (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  57. ^ "Princess Row". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  58. ^ "O'Keefe's Buildings". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  59. ^ "Illawarra Buildings". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  60. ^ "Florence House". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  61. ^ "Young's Shop/Residence". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  62. ^ "Warren Lodge (former)". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  63. ^ "Albert Villa". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  64. ^ "Hibernia Scotia Terrace". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  65. ^ "25 Wellington Street, Petrie Terrace". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  66. ^ "Swift's Shop House". Brisbane Heritage Register. Brisbane City Council. Retrieved 9 March 2020.
  67. ^ "State and non-state school details". Queensland Government. 9 July 2018. Archived from the original on 21 November 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2018.
  68. ^ "ACARA School Profile 2018". Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. Archived from the original on 27 August 2020. Retrieved 28 January 2020.
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  70. ^ "Brisbane Arts Theatre". Brisbane Arts Theatre. Archived from the original on 15 May 2021. Retrieved 7 January 2022.

External links[edit]