List of former state routes in Georgia (U.S. state)

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This is a List of former state routes in the U.S. state of Georgia. This list represents routes that traveled through the state but are no longer in operation, have been decommissioned, or have been renumbered.


State Route 1E[edit]

State Route 1E
Location: Floyd CountyRome
Existed: 1955[3][4]–1985[1][2]

State Route 1E (SR 1E) was a route in Floyd County extending along present-day Old Cedartown Road, Park Avenue, Maple Avenue, East Sixth Street, and 2nd Avenue from US 27/SR 1 to US 27/SR 1, as well as US 411/SR 53. Originally part of US 27/SR 1, it was originally designated as SR 1 before being reassigned as SR 1E in 1955.[3][4] US 27/SR 1 had been relocated along former SR 1 Spur, which is present-day US 27/SR 1 from Old Cedartown Road to present-day US 411 in 1938 with the old route remaining as SR 1 through Lindale. When US 27 was upgraded and relocated in 1968 to the Rome Connector, SR 1E was truncated to end at the present-day interchange of Maple Avenue. Essentially a business route for an unincorporated community south of Rome, the state no longer saw the value in retaining an old alignment and transferred control to Floyd County in 1985.[1][2]

State Route 3W (Albany 1946–1957)[edit]

State Route 3W
Location: Albany
Existed: 1946[6][7]–1960[4][5]

State Route 3W (SR 3W) was a state highway in the city of Albany. It traversed portions of Dougherty and Lee counties. At least as early as 1919, SR 3 traveled on essentially the same path as it currently does in the Albany metropolitan area.[8] By the end of 1926, the segment of the highway from the Mitchell–Dougherty county line to Albany had a "completed hard surface".[9][10] By the end of 1929, US 19 was designated on this stretch of SR 3.[10][11]

By the end of 1946, SR 3W was projected to be designated from the western part of Albany to US 19/SR 3 north of the city.[6][7] By the middle of 1950, the entire length of SR 3W was hard surfaced.[12][13] By July 1957, SR 3 in the northern part of Albany was redesignated as SR 3 Conn. due to SR 3W being redesignated as part of SR 3.[4][5]

State Route 3W (Albany 1960–1973)[edit]

State Route 3W
Location: Albany
Existed: 1960[5][16]–1973[14][15]

State Route 3W (SR 3W) was a state highway that existed in the city of Albany. It traversed portions of Dougherty and Lee counties. At least as early as 1919, SR 3 traveled on essentially the same path through the city as it currently does.[8] By the end of 1926, the segment from the Mitchell–Dougherty county line to Albany had a "completed hard surface".[9][10] By the end of 1929, US 19 was designated on it through the Albany metropolitan area.[10][11]

By the end of 1946, SR 3W was projected to be designated from the western part of Albany to US 19/SR 3 north of the city.[6][7] By April 1949, the southern part of SR 3W was hard surfaced, while its northern part had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[17][12] By the middle of 1950, the entire length of SR 3W was hard surfaced.[12][13] By July 1957, SR 3 in the northern part of Albany was redesignated as SR 3 Conn. due to SR 3W being redesignated as part of SR 3.[4][5] By June 1960, SR 3 Conn. was redesignated as part of the SR 3 mainline, and its old path was redesignated as the second SR 3W in the city.[5][16] In 1973, SR 3W was redesignated as part of SR 3, while its former path was redesignated as part of SR 133.[14][15]

State Route 3W (Thomaston)[edit]

State Route 3W
Location: Thomaston
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1987[18][19]

State Route 3W (SR 3W) was a state highway that existed in the city of Thomaston, in Upson County. At least as early as 1919, SR 3 traveled on essentially the same path through the city as it currently does.[8] By the end of 1926, the segment of SR 3 through Thomaston had a "completed hard surface".[9][10] By the end of 1929, US 19 was designated on this segment.[10][11] By June 1963, the path of SR 3 in Thomaston was split into SR 3W and SR 3E. It was unclear as to which highway US 19 traveled on.[16][20] In 1987, SR 3W was redesignated as SR 3S.[18][19]

State Route 3E (Thomaston)[edit]

State Route 3E
Location: Thomaston
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1987[18][19]

State Route 3E (SR 3E) was a state highway that existed in the city of Thomaston, in Upson County. At least as early as 1919, SR 3 traveled on essentially the same path through the city as it currently does.[8] By the end of 1926, the segment of SR 3 through Thomaston had a "completed hard surface".[9][10] By the end of 1929, US 19 was designated on this segment.[10][11] By June 1963, the path of SR 3 in Thomaston was split into SR 3W and SR 3E. It was unclear as to which highway US 19 traveled on.[16][20] In 1987, SR 3E was redesignated as SR 3N.[18][19]

State Route 3N[edit]

State Route 3N
Location: Thomaston
Existed: 1987[18][19]–1988[19][21]

State Route 3N (SR 3N) was a short-lived state highway that existed in the city of Thomaston, in Upson County. At least as early as 1919, SR 3 traveled on essentially the same path through the city as it currently does.[8] By the end of 1926, the segment of SR 3 through Thomaston had a "completed hard surface".[9][10] By the end of 1929, US 19 was designated on this segment.[10][11] By June 1963, the path of SR 3 in Thomaston was split into SR 3W and SR 3E. It was unclear as to which highway US 19 traveled on.[16][20] In 1987, SR 3E was redesignated as SR 3N.[18][19] In 1988, SR 3N in Thomaston was redesignated as the northbound lanes of SR 3.[19][21]

State Route 3S (Thomaston)[edit]

State Route 3S
Location: Thomaston
Existed: 1987[18][19]–1988[19][21]

State Route 3S (SR 3S) was a short-lived state highway that existed in the city of Thomaston, in Upson County. At least as early as 1919, SR 3 traveled on essentially the same path through the city as it currently does.[8] By the end of 1926, the segment of SR 3 through Thomaston had a "completed hard surface".[9][10] By the end of 1929, US 19 was designated on this segment.[10][11] By June 1963, the path of SR 3 in Thomaston was split into SR 3W and SR 3E. It was unclear as to which highway US 19 traveled on.[16][20] In 1987, SR 3W was redesignated as SR 3S.[18][19] In 1988, SR 3S in Thomaston was redesignated as the southbound lanes of SR 3.[19][21]

State Route 3W (Atlanta–Marietta 1937–1946)[edit]

State Route 3W
Location: AtlantaMarietta
Existed: 1937[22][23]–1946[6][7]

State Route 3W (SR 3W) was a state highway that existed in Atlanta and Marietta. It traversed portions of Fulton and Cobb counties. At least as early as 1919, SR 3 traveled on essentially the same path through this area as it currently does.[8] By the end of 1926, US 41 had been designated on this segment of the highway. The Atlanta–Marietta segment had a "completed hard surface".[9][10]

Late in 1937, SR 3 was split into two parts between Atlanta and the northwest part of Marietta. US 41/SR 3 traveled northwest on the original path, while SR 3E traveled north-northwest on a more eastern path between the two cities.[24][22] By the end of the year, SR 3W was established, traveling northwest with US 41 on Marietta Street and Old Marietta Road.[22][23] By the end of 1946, SR 3W was redesignated as part of the SR 3 mainline.[6][7]

State Route 3W (Atlanta–Marietta 1954–1955)[edit]

State Route 3W
Location: AtlantaMarietta
Existed: 1954[25][3]–1955[3][4]

State Route 3W (SR 3W) was a short-lived state highway that existed in Atlanta and Marietta. It traversed portions of Fulton and Cobb counties. At least as early as 1919, SR 3 traveled on essentially the same path through these cities as it currently does.[8] By the end of 1926, US 41 had been designated on this segment of SR 3. It had a "completed hard surface".[9][10]

Late in 1937, SR 3 was split into two parts between Atlanta and the northwest part of Marietta. US 41/SR 3 traveled northwest on the original path, while SR 3E traveled north-northwest on a more eastern path between the two cities.[24][22] By the end of the year, SR 3W was established, traveling northwest with US 41 on Marietta Street and Old Marietta Road, while SR 3E traveled north-northwest on Hemphill Street and Northside Drive.[22][23] By the end of 1946, SR 3W was redesignated as part of the SR 3 mainline.[6][7] By June 1954, the second SR 3W in this area was designated between the two cities.[25][3] By June 1955, it was redesignated as part of SR 3.[3][4]

State Route 3E (Atlanta–Marietta)[edit]

State Route 3E
Location: AtlantaMarietta
Existed: 1937[24][22]–1985[26][2]

State Route 3E (SR 3E) was a state highway that existed in Atlanta and Marietta. It traversed portions of Fulton and Cobb counties. At least as early as 1919, SR 3 traveled on essentially the same path through these two cities as it currently does.[8] By the end of 1926, US 41 had been designated on this entire segment of SR 3, which had a "completed hard surface".[9][10]

Late in 1937, SR 3 was split into two parts between Atlanta and the northwest part of Marietta. US 41/SR 3 traveled northwest on the original path, while SR 3E traveled north-northwest on a more eastern path between the two cities. SR 3E's path from SR 120 in the east part of Marietta to US 41/SR 3 in the northwestern part of the city. The rest of SR 3E was under construction.[24][22] By the end of the year, SR 3W was established, traveling northwest with US 41 on Marietta Street and Old Marietta Road, while SR 3E traveled north-northwest on Hemphill Street and Northside Drive. All of SR 3E in the northern part of Atlanta was hard surfaced. From the north part of the city to the northwest part, the highway had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[22][23] Later that year, all of SR 3E from Atlanta to northwest of the Fulton–Cobb county line had a completed hard surface.[23][27]

In 1940, nearly the entire segment of SR 3E in Marietta had a completed hard surface. It was under construction from northwest of the Fulton–Cobb county line to the eastern part of Marietta.[28][29] By the end of the next year, the entire length of SR 3E had a completed hard surface.[30][31] By February 1948, SR 3E was moved off of Hemphill Avenue. It, along with US 41 Temp., followed US 19 on Spring Street, then traveled west on 14th Street and resumed the Northside Drive path.[7][17] By April 1949, US 41 Temp./SR 3E's southbound lanes traveled on Hemphill Avenue.[17][12] By the middle of 1950, US 41 Temp./SR 3E was shifted off of US 19 on Spring Street and 14th Street, and traveled on Hemphill Avenue again.[12][13] In 1952, US 41 Temp. was redesignated as part of the US 41 mainline.[32][33] In 1985, SR 3E was decommissioned.[26][2]

State Route 3S (Marietta)[edit]

State Route 3S
Location: Marietta
Existed: 1965[20][37]–1980[15][34][35][36]

State Route 3S (SR 3S) was a state highway that existed in the city limits of Marietta in Cobb County, Georgia. By the end of 1965, it was designated from SR 3 to SR 5.[20][37] Between 1974[15][34] and March 1980, SR 3S was redesignated as SR 3 Spur.[35][36]

State Route 4[edit]

State Route 4
Location: AlabamaCartersville
Existed: 1919[8]–1929[10][11]

State Route 4 (SR 4) was a state highway that was formed at least as early as 1919.[8] It began at the Alabama state line, traveled to the east-southeast and intersected SR 1 in Rome. It then curved to the southeast and reached its eastern terminus, an intersection with SR 3 in Cartersvile. By the end of 1921, SR 4 was extended southeast into the main part of Cartersville, on a concurrency with SR 3 and headed north-northeast to an intersection with SR 2/SR 53 in Fairmount.[8][9] By the end of 1926, almost all of the Alabama–Rome segment, and the southern half of the 1921 extension, had a "sand clay or top soil" surface. In the vicinity of Rome, the highway had a "completed hard surface". About half of the Rome–Cartersville segment was under construction. The easternmost part of this segment, and nearly the entire SR 3 concurrency, had a "completed semi hard surface".[9][10] By the end of 1929, the entire length of the original segment of SR 4 was redesignated as SR 20, with US 41W designated along the Rome–Cartersville segment. US 41 was designated along the former SR 3 concurrency. The 1921 extension was redesignated as SR 61.[10][11]

State Route 7W[edit]

State Route 7W
Location: Crisp County
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1985[1][2]

State Route 7W (SR 7W) was a state highway that existed in the south-central part of the state. Between June 1960 and June 1963, the path of SR 7 through the Cordele area was split into SR 7W and SR 7E. SR 7W traveled through the western part of the city.[16][20] In 1985, it was decommissioned.[1][2]

The entire route was in Crisp County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
US 41 / SR 7 south / SR 7E north Southern terminus of SR 7W and SR 7E; northern terminus of southern segment of SR 7
Cordele US 280 / SR 30
US 41 / SR 7 north / SR 7E south Northern terminus of SR 7W and SR 7E; southern terminus of northern segment of SR 7
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 7E[edit]

State Route 7E
Location: Crisp County
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1985[1][2]

State Route 7E (SR 7E) was a state highway that existed in the south-central part of the state. Between June 1960 and June 1963, the path of SR 7 through the Cordele area was split into SR 7W and SR 7E. SR 7E traveled through the main part of the city, concurrent with US 41.[16][20] In 1985, it was redesignated as part of the SR 7 mainline.[1][2]

The entire route was in Crisp County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
US 41 / SR 7 south / SR 7W north Southern terminus of SR 7W and SR 7E; northern terminus of southern segment of SR 7
Cordele US 280 / SR 30
SR 257 north Southern terminus of SR 257
US 41 / SR 7 north / SR 7E south Northern terminus of SR 7W and SR 7E; southern terminus of northern segment of SR 7
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 9E[edit]

State Route 9E
Location: Forsyth, Dawson, and Lumpkin counties
Length: 21.319 mi[40] (34.310 km)
Existed: 1941[41][30]–1981[38][39]

State Route 9E (SR 9E) was a 21.319-mile-long (34.310 km) state highway. It was originally constructed early in 1941.[41][30] In July 1981, as the extension of SR 400 had reached SR 60 south-southeast of Dahlonega, this designation was decommissioned.[38][39]

The routing that was followed by SR 9E starts where Hopewell Road splits from the current SR 9 north-northeast of Coal Mountain in Forsyth County, and parallels SR 400 very closely. The road changes names to Lumpkin Campground Road as it enters Dawson County, passes by the North Georgia Premium Outlet Mall, then crosses SR 53 and SR 400 in rapid succession. Just before intersecting with SR 136 the road changes names again to Harmony Church Road, then is called Auraria Road as it becomes SR 136. The road crosses SR 400 once more to its west, parts ways with SR 136, then travels north through the community of Auraria into Lumpkin County to its northern terminus at SR 9/SR 52 west of Dahlonega.[40] [42]

State Route 11E[edit]

State Route 11E
Location: Bibb County
Existed: 1953[33][25]–1963[16][20]

State Route 11E (SR 11E) was a state highway that existed entirely within Bibb County in the Macon metropolitan area. It functioned like an eastern alternate route of US 41/SR 11/SR 49. In 1953, it was established from US 41/SR 11/SR 49/SR 247 south-southwest of Macon to US 41/SR 11/SR 49 in the city.[33][25] Between June 1960 and June 1963, SR 49 was shifted eastward, off of US 41/SR 11 and replacing SR 11E.[16][20]

State Route 13W[edit]

State Route 13W
Location: Fulton and DeKalb counties
Existed: 1946[6][7]–1971[43][44]

State Route 13W (SR 13W) was a state highway that existed in the Atlanta metropolitan area. Between the beginning of 1945 and November 1946, it was established from US 19/SR 9 north of Atlanta to the southwestern corner of North Atlanta.[6][7] Between February 1948 and April 1949, its northern terminus was extended to US 23/SR 13 east-northeast of North Atlanta.[17][12] In 1971, SR 13W was redesignated as part of SR 141 (Peachtree Road/Peachtree Industrial Boulevard) and SR 13 Conn.[43][44]


County Location mi km Destinations Notes
Fulton Buckhead US 19 / SR 9 (Peachtree Road) Southern terminus
SR 237 (Piedmont Road)
DeKalb Doraville SR 141 north Southern terminus of SR 141
US 23 / SR 13 (Buford Highway) Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 15W[edit]

State Route 15W
Location: Athens
Existed: 1946[6][7]–1949[17][12]

State Route 15W (SR 15W) was a short-lived state highway that existed completely within the city limits of Athens. It functioned like a bypass of downtown. Between the beginning of 1945 and November 1946, it was established from US 129/US 441/SR 15/SR 24 north-northwest to US 129/SR 15.[6][7] Between February 1948 and April 1949, the path of SR 15 was shifted westward, replacing SR 15W.[17][12][not in citation given]

The entire route was in Athens, Clarke County.

mi km Destinations Notes
US 129 / US 441 / SR 15 / SR 24 Southern terminus
US 29 / US 78 / SR 8 / SR 10
US 129 / SR 15 Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 16S[edit]

State Route 16S
Location: Jefferson, Glascock, and Warren counties
Existed: 1942[31][45]–1952[32][33]

State Route 16S (SR 16S) was a state highway that existed in portions of Jefferson, Glascock, and Warren counties. In 1942, it was established from an intersection with SR 16 west-northwest of Wrens to another intersection with SR 16 southeast of Warrenton.[31][45] A decade later, the path of SR 16 southeast of Warrenton was shifted southward, replacing the path of SR 16S. The portion from southeast of Warrenton to northwest of Wrens was redesignated as SR 16 Conn., while the portion from northwest of Wrens to north of Louisville was redesignated as SR 16 Conn.[32][33]


County Location mi km Destinations Notes
Jefferson SR 16 Southern terminus
Glascock
No major junctions
Warren SR 16 Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 20 (1919–1921)[edit]

State Route 20
Location: GraySparta
Existed: 1919[8]–1921[8][9]

State Route 20 (SR 20) was a very short-lived state highway that traveled from Gray to Sparta. It was formed at least as early as 1919[8] and was decommissioned in 1921 and redesignated SR 22.[8][9] It began at an intersection with SR 11 in Gray. It traveled to the east-northeast and entered Milledgeville, where it intersected SR 24 and SR 29. It then went northeast to Sparta, where it met its eastern terminus, an intersection with SR 15 and SR 16.

State Route 20 (1921–1929)[edit]

State Route 20
Location: LouisvilleWaynesboro
Existed: 1921[8][9]–1929[10][11]

State Route 20 (SR 20) was a state highway in the east-central part of the state. At least as early as 1919, part of SR 24 was established from Louisville to Waynesboro.[8] By the end of September 1921, the path of SR 24, from Waynesboro to Louisville, was shifted northwestward. The former path of SR 24 was redesignated as SR 20.[8][9] Between October 1926 and October 1929, the path of SR 24, from Augusta to Louisville, was reverted to the Waynesboro–Louisville path, replacing SR 20. SR 24's former path, on US 1, was redesignated as part of SR 4.[10][11]


County Location mi km Destinations Notes
Jefferson Louisville US 1 / SR 17 / SR 24 Western terminus
Burke SR 56 south Northern terminus of SR 56
Waynesboro SR 21 Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 26E[edit]

State Route 26E
Location: Tybee Island
Existed: 1969[46][47]–1985[1][2]

State Route 26E (SR 26E) was a state highway that existed in the eastern part of Chatham County, in Savannah Beach, which is what Tybee Island was known at the time. The roadway that would eventually become SR 26E was established between June 1963 and the end of 1965, as SR 26 Loop, between two intersections with US 80/SR 26 in the southern part of the city.[20][37] In 1969, it was redesignated as SR 26E.[46][47] In 1985, SR 26E was decommissioned.[1][2]

The entire route was in Savannah Beach, Chatham County.

mi km Destinations Notes
US 80 / SR 26 Western terminus
US 80 / SR 26 Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 27S[edit]

State Route 27S
Location: Dodge County
Existed: 1965[20][37]–1977[48][49]

State Route 27S (SR 27S) was a state highway that existed in the central part of Dodge County, southwest of Eastman. Between June 1963 and the end of 1965, it was established from US 341/SR 27 west of Eastman to US 23/US 341/SR 27 southeast of the city.[20][37] In 1977, it was decommissioned.[48][49]

The entire route was in Dodge County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
US 341 / SR 27 Western terminus
US 23 / US 341 / SR 27 Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 28[edit]

State Route 28
Location: GeorgetownVienna
Existed: 1919[8]–1937[22][23]

State Route 28 (SR 28) was a state highway that traveled from Georgetown to Vienna. It was established at least as early as 1919[8] and was decommissioned in 1937.[22][23] It began at an intersection with SR 39 in Georgetown. It traveled to the northeast and intersected SR 1 in Lumpkin. It curved to the east-southeast through Preston. In Americus, the highway intersected SR 3 and SR 26. It headed to the east and entered Vienna, where it met its eastern terminus, an intersection with SR 7. By the end of 1926, a segment just east of Preston was under construction. The eastern half of the Preston–Americus segment had a completed hard surface. The Dooly County portion of the highway had a sand clay or topsoil surface.[9][10] By the end of 1929, a segment just east of Lumpkin and a segment just west of Preston had a sand clay or topsoil surface.[10][11] By the middle of 1930, SR 28 was extended northeast from Vienna to Hawkinsville.[11][50] A few months later, the Richland–Preston segment was under construction.[50][51] By 1932, US 280 was designated on the Richland–Americus segment.[51][52] Near the end of the year, the entire Vienna–Hawkinsville segment had a sand clay or topsoil surface.[53][54] By the end of 1937, s segment just southwest of Hawkinsville had a completed hard surface.[24][22] Just a few months later, all of SR 28 had been redesignated as SR 27.[22][23]

State Route 34[edit]

State Route 34
Location: CarrolltonVilla Rica
Existed: 1919[8]–1926[9][10]

State Route 34 (SR 34) was a short-lived state highway in the western part of the state. It was established at least as early as 1919[8] and was decommissioned in 1926.[9][10] When it was established, it extended from SR 1 and SR 16 in Carrollton to SR 8 in Villa Rica. In 1926, its entire length consisted of a "sand clay or top soil" surface and was redesignated as a southern branch of SR 8.[9][10] Within three years, US 78S had been designated along the path of SR 8's southern branch.[10][11] A decade later, US 78S had been redesignated as US 78 Alt.[23][27] Nearly another decade later, SR 8 had been redesignated as SR 8 Alt.[7][17] By the beginning of 1953, US 78 Alt. had been decommissioned.[32][33] By the middle of 1954, SR 8 Alt. had been redesignated as SR 166 from Carrollton to northeast of the city and SR 61 from that point to Villa Rica, as they travel today.[25][3]

State Route 36[edit]

State Route 36
Location: CommerceSouth Carolina state line east-southeast of Elberton
Existed: 1919[8]–1941[30][31]

State Route 36 (SR 36) was a state highway that originally existed from Danielsville to Elberton, when it was established at least as early as 1919.[8] By the middle of 1930, its western terminus was shifted southwestward into Athens.[11][50] By the end of the year, the western terminus had been reverted to Danielsville and extended northwest to Commerce. The Athens–Comer segment was redesignated as SR 82.[50][51] In 1941, all of SR 82 and the Comer–South Carolina segment of SR 36 had been redesignated as SR 72, while the Commerce–Comer segment of SR 36 had been redesignated as SR 98.[30][31]

State Route 42A[edit]

State Route 42A
Location: Atlanta
Existed: 1941[30][31]–1946[6][7]

State Route 42A (SR 42A) was a state highway in Atlanta. It was entirely concurrent with US 29/US 78/SR 8/SR 10/SR 12 (Ponce de Leon Avenue). It was formed in 1941[30][31] and decommissioned only five years later, in 1946.[6][7] It began at an intersection with US 19/SR 9 in the northern part of the city. From there, US 29/US 78/SR 8/SR 10/SR 12/SR 42A traveled to the east to an intersection with SR 42. Here, SR 42A ended, and US 29/US 78/SR 8/SR 10/SR 12 continued to the east.

State Route 43[edit]

State Route 43
Location: Atlanta
Existed: 1919[8]–1941[30][31]

State Route 43 (SR 43) was a state highway that originally existed from a point north-northwest of Gainesville, north-northeast to Cleveland, and then northwest to Turners Corner, when it was established at least as early as 1919.[8] Its original southern terminus was at SR 11 north-northwest of Gainesville, and its original northern terminus was at SR 9 in Turners Corner.[8] By the end of 1921, SR 11 and SR 43 were swapped in this area. SR 11 took over the entire route of SR 43, while SR 43 was shifted to travel from a point north-northeast of Gainesville northwest to SR 9 just northeast of Dahlonega.[8][9] By the end of 1926, the southern part of the new path had a sand clay or top soil surface, and the rest of it had a completed semi hard surface.[9][10] By the end of 1929, the Lumpkin County portion of the highway had a completed hard surface.[10][11] By the middle of the next year, all of the highway was completed.[11][50] In 1941, SR 43 was redesignated as SR 52.[30][31]

State Route 44[edit]

State Route 44
Location: Alabama state line northwest of JakinBrinson
Existed: 1919[8]–1921[8][9]

State Route 44 (SR 44) was a short-lived state highway that only existed from the Alabama state line, northwest of Jakin, to Brinson. It was established at least as early as 1919,[8] and was decommissioned by the end of 1921.[8][9] It was redesignated as part of SR 38.[8][9]

State Route 45[edit]

State Route 45
Location: Avondale Estates–west-southwest of Athens
Existed: 1919[8]–1926[9][10]

State Route 45 (SR 45) was a short-lived state highway in the north-central part of the state. It was established at least as early as 1919 on a path from SR 8 and SR 13 in Lawrenceville, south-southeast to Loganville, east-southeast to SR 11 in Monroe, and east-northeast to SR 15 in Watkinsville.[8] By the end of 1921, the Lawrenceville–Loganville segment was redesignated as a southern extension of SR 13, the western terminus was extended west-southwest to what was known as "Ingleside" (now known as Avondale Estates), and the eastern terminus was shifted to the northwest to end at SR 8 west-southwest of Athens.[8][9] By the end of 1926, the segment from Ingleside (now labeled as "Avondale") to Loganville and the segment from Monroe to the Athens area were redesignated as US 78/SR 10, while the Loganville–Monroe segment was also redesignated as US 78 and SR 13 (and possibly SR 10).[9][10]

State Route 46[edit]

State Route 46
Location: SylvesterTifton
Existed: 1919[8]–1921[8][9]

State Route 46 (SR 46) was a short-lived state highway that started at SR 32 and SR 33 in Sylvester to SR 7 and SR 35 in Tifton. It was established at least as early as 1919.[8] By the end of 1921, the entire highway was redesignated as part of SR 50.[8][9]

State Route 50N[edit]

State Route 50N
Location: Albany
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1973[14][15]

State Route 50N (SR 50N) was a state highway that existed in the city limits of Albany, within Dougherty County. The roadway that would eventually become SR 50N was established at least as early as 1919 as SR 32 from Dawson through Albany and into Sylvester.[8] By the end of 1921, SR 50 was designated across the state. This truncated SR 32 at Ashburn.[8][9] By the end of 1926, the portion of SR 50 in the eastern part of Albany had a "completed hard surface".[9][10]

By the middle of 1930, from west of Albany to the Worth–Tift county line, the highway had a completed hard surface. The western half of the Dougherty County portion of the Dawson–Albany segment had a completed semi hard surface.[11][50] In January 1932, the Dawson–Albany segment had a completed hard surface.[52][55]

Between February 1948 and April 1949, US 82 was designated on SR 50 through the Albany area.[17][12] Between June 1960 and June 1963, the path of SR& 50 through Albany was split into SR 50N and SR 50S. SR 50N used Broad Avenue and Sylvester Road, while US 82/SR 50S used Oglethorpe Avenue and Albany Expressway.[16][20] In 1973, SR 50N was redesignated as SR 50 Conn., while SR 50S was redesignated as the SR 50 mainline.[14][15]

State Route 50S[edit]

State Route 50S
Location: Albany
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1973[14][15]

State Route 50S (SR 50S) was a state highway that existed in the city limits of Albany, within Dougherty County. The roadway that would eventually become SR 50S was established at least as early as 1919 as SR 32 from Dawson through Albany and into Sylvester.[8] By the end of 1921, SR 50 was designated across the state. This truncated SR 32 at Ashburn.[8][9] By the end of 1926, the portion of SR 50 in the eastern part of Albany had a "completed hard surface".[9][10]

By the middle of 1930, from west of Albany to the Worth–Tift county line, the highway had a completed hard surface. The western half of the Dougherty County portion of the Dawson–Albany segment had a completed semi hard surface.[11][50] In January 1932, the Dawson–Albany segment had a completed hard surface.[52][55]

Between February 1948 and April 1949, US 82 was designated on SR 50 through the Albany area.[17][12] Between June 1960 and June 1963, the path of SR& 50 through Albany was split into SR 50N and SR 50S. SR 50N used Broad Avenue and Sylvester Road, while US 82/SR 50S used Oglethorpe Avenue and Albany Expressway.[16][20] In 1973, SR 50N was redesignated as SR 50 Conn., while SR 50S was redesignated as the SR 50 mainline.[14][15]

State Route 52[edit]

State Route 52
Location: ColumbiaRichmond counties
Existed: 1921[8][9]–1937[22][23]

State Route 52 (SR 52) was a state highway in Columbia and Richmond counties, in the Augusta metropolitan area. Between 1919 and 1921, SR 52 was designated from the South Carolina state line, northwest of Augusta, and the South Carolin state line again on the northeastern edge of the city.[8][9] Before 1926 ended, the entire length of SR 52 had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[9][10] By the middle of 1930, in an area northwest of Augusta, SR 52 was shifted to a more western alignment. This segment was located about half of the distance from the Columbia–Richmond county line and the original segment. The original part northwest of the split did not have a highway number. The highway had a "completed hard surface" from there to Augusta.[11][50] The year ended with all of SR 52 having a "completed hard surface". The original part's Richmond County portion did, too.[50][51] By February 1932, the entire length of the highway had a completed hard surface.[52][55] Near the end of the year, the northwestern part of SR 52 was shifted back to its original alignment and re-signed as SR 52. The western extended part was re-designated as SR 104.[56][57] Before 1938, all of SR 52 was redesignated as the southern segment of SR 28.[22][23]

State Route 54B[edit]

State Route 54B
Location: SharpsburgFayetteville
Existed: 1921[8][9]–1934[58][59]

State Route 54B (SR 54B) was a state highway just south of Atlanta. When it was established in between 1919 and 1921, it extended from an intersection with SR 16 in Sharpsburg northeast to an intersection with SR 54 in Fayetteville.[8][9] By the end of 1926, the northern half had a sand clay or top soil surface.[9][10] Nearly a decade later, the entire length of SR 54B was redesignated as a re-routing of the SR 54 mainline.[58][59]

State Route 56 Spur[edit]

State Route 56 Spur
Location: Augusta
Length: 6.6 mi[62] (10.6 km)

State Route 56 Spur (SR 56 Spur) was a 6.6-mile-long (10.6 km) spur route that existed entirely within the southeastern part of Richmond County. Its route was entirely within the city limits of Augusta. Its west–east section was part of Tobacco Road. It was known as Doug Barnard Parkway for the rest of its length. Its entire length was within the city limits of Augusta. Its southern terminus was at an intersection with the SR 56 mainline (Mike Padgett Highway). Its northern terminus was at an intersection with US 1/US 25/US 78/US 278/SR 10/SR 121 (Gordon Highway) in downtown Augusta. Here, the roadway continues as Molly Pond Road.[62] The highway was decommissioned in 2014.[60][61]

State Route 60 (1921–1926)[edit]

State Route 60
Location: Sterling
Existed: 1921[8][9]–1926[9][10]

State Route 60 (SR 60) was a short-lived state highway in the southeastern part of the state. When it was established between 1919 and 1921, it extended from SR 27 in Sterling northeast to an intersection with SR 25 south-southwest of Darien.[8][9] By the end of 1926, the highway was removed from the state highway system.[9][10] This short segment of highway would later be used as part of SR 99.[45][63]

State Route 60 (1930–1940)[edit]

State Route 60
Location: Social Circle
Existed: 1930[50][51]–1940[29][64]

State Route 60 (SR 60) was a very short state highway that existed entirely within Walton County. The roadway that would eventually become SR 60 was built between 1921 and the end of 1926 as an unnumbered road from SR 11 in Social Circle to SR 12 southeast of the city. The entire length of the highway had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[9][10] In 1930, this road was designated as SR 60.[50][51] At the end of 1940, SR 60 was redesignated as SR 181.[29][64]

State Route 62[edit]

State Route 62
Location: TalmoHomer
Existed: 1926[9][10]–1929[10][11]

State Route 62 (SR 62) was a short-lived state highway in the northeastern part of the state. It was proposed between 1919 and 1921 on a path from SR 11 at a point northwest of Jefferson, at approximately the location of Talmo, northeast to SR 15 in Homer.[8][9] By the end of 1926, SR 62 was established on this same path, with US 129 having been applied onto SR 11.[9][10] Within three years, this short highway had been decommissioned.[10][11]

State Route 63[edit]

State Route 63
Location: Fancy HallPembroke
Existed: 1921[8][9]–1967[65][66]

State Route 63 (SR 63) was a state highway that existed in the east-central part of the state. When it was established between 1919 and 1921, it only extended from SR 30 in Ellabell to SR 26 at a point that approximates today's location of Eden.[8][9] By the end of 1926, its termini were shifted to SR 30 in Lanier to US 80/SR 26 in Blitchton.[9][10] By the end of 1929, the highway's western portion had a "sand clay or top soil" surface, while its eastern portion was under construction. Also, the western terminus was shifted again, to Pembroke.[10][11] The next year, the eastern portion had a sand clay or top soil surface.[11][50] At the end of the year, US 280 was designated along the entire path of SR 63.[51][52] Before 1934 ended, the western portion had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[58][59] Just a few months later the eastern portion of SR 63 was under the same condition.[67][68] About six months later, the eastern terminus area had a completed hard surface.[69][70] Near the end of 1936, the rest of the highway also had a completed hard surface.[71][72] About a year later, SR 30's length southeast of Pembroke was swapped with the entire length of SR 63. That meant that SR 63 eastern-most terminus was now at US 17/SR 25 southeast of Clyde. The portion of this "new" path just southeast of Pembroke, as well as the entire segment southeast of Clyde, was under construction.[24][22] Within a year, those under construction segments had completed grading, but were not surfaced.[23][27] By the middle of 1939, a small portion of the highway farther to the southeast of Pembroke had the same conditions.[27][73] Before the year ended, the rest of the highway's length also had the same conditions.[74][75] A few months later, most of the highway's length that today is within the boundaries of Fort Stewart was under construction.[75][28] Later in 1940, the segment from US 17/SR 25 to SR 144 southeast of Clyde had a completed hard surface.[29][64] About five years later, Fort Stewart was established. Most of the state highways that traveled within the area now covered by the base were removed. Due to this, SR 63 was split into two short segments: one from the northern edge of the base to Pembroke and one from Richmond Hill to the southeastern edge of the base.[6][7] By the end of 1948, state highways were re-established through the base, thereby reconnecting SR 63 as a single highway.[7][17] One year later, the eastern terminus of the highway was extended south-southeast to Fancy Hall.[12][13] Before 1953 ended, the Keller–Richmond Hill segment was hard surfaced.[33][25] In 1954, the segment from the northern edge of Fort Stewart to Pembroke was hard surfaced.[25][3] At the end of the decade, the Fancy Hall–Keller segment was paved.[5][16] Before 1966 began SR 63 Spur had been established from SR 63 southeast of Richmond Hill east to Fort McAllister.[20][37] In 1967, SR 67's path south of Pembroke was shifted to the east, taking over the entire path of SR 63; therefore, SR 63 Spur was redesignated as SR 67 Spur.[65][66]

State Route 63 Spur[edit]

State Route 63 Spur
Location: Southeast of Richmond HillFort McAllister
Existed: 1966[20][37]–1967[65][66]

State Route 63 Spur (SR 63 Spur) was a short-lived spur route of SR 63. Before 1966 began, SR 63 Spur was established from the SR 63 mainline southeast of Richmond Hill east to Fort McAllister.[20][37] In 1967, SR 67's path south of Pembroke was shifted to the east, taking over the entire path of SR 63; therefore, SR 63 Spur was redesignated as SR 67 Spur.[65][66] In the middle 1970s, SR 144 was extended east and south-southeast, taking over the route of SR 67 southeast of Fort Stewart; therefore, SR 67 was redesignated as SR 144 Spur.[15][34]

State Route 65[edit]

State Route 65
Location: Rabun County
Existed: 1921[8][9]–1932[56][57]

State Route 65 (SR 65) was a state highway that formerly exited in the extreme northeastern part of the state. At least as early as 1919, a local road was established between the North Carolina and South Carolina state lines in Rabun County.[8] By 1921, this road was designated as SR 65.[8][9] By February 1932, the entire length of SR 65 had a completed hard surface.[52][55] Near the end of the year, all of SR 65 was redesignated as SR 105.[56][57] This roadway would eventually be redesignated as the northern segment of SR 28.[22][23]

State Route 68[edit]

State Route 68
Location: CummingBuford
Existed: 1921[8][9]–January 1932[52][55]

State Route 68 (SR 68) was a short-lived state highway in the north-central part of the state. When it was established between 1919 and 1921, it extended from SR 9 in Cumming southeast to SR 13 in Buford.[8][9] In January 1932, SR 68 was decommissioned and redesignated as part of SR 20.[52][55]

State Route 69[edit]

State Route 69
Location: Towns County
Existed: 1930[50][51]–1960[5][16]

State Route 69 (SR 69) was a very short state highway located entirely in Towns County in the extreme northern part of the state. The highway traveled from US 76/SR 2 north to the North Carolina state line, where it became North Carolina Highway 69 (NC 69). SR 69 followed the roadway currently designated as the concurrency of SR 17/SR 515. It was formed in 1930,[50][51] and was redesignated as part of SR 17 between 1957 and 1960.[5][16]

Between 1919 and 1921, the roadway that would eventually become SR 69 was established as an unnumbered road from SR 2 in Hiawassee to the North Carolina state line north of Hiawassee.[8][9] By the end of 1930, this road was designated as SR 69, with a completed semi hard surface.[50][51] A few years later, the highway's location was shifted a few miles to the west. Its southern terminus was still at SR 2, but began northwest of Hiawassee, as it currently travels.[58][59] By the end of 1935, the highway had a completed hard surface.[70][76] Twenty years later, SR 17 north of US 76/SR 2 was shifted to the west to travel concurrently with SR 69.[3][4] Between 1957 and 1960, SR 69 was decommissioned, while SR 17 stayed on this segment of highway.[5][16]

State Route 70[edit]

State Route 70
Location: Lincolnton
Existed: 1932[51][54]–1941[30][31]

State Route 70 (SR 70) was a state highway that existed in the east-central part of the state. When it was established between 1930 and 1932, it extended from Lincolnton to the South Carolina state line. At this time, the highway was under construction.[51][54] In early 1934, SR 70 was extended south-southwest to US 78/SR 10/SR 17 north-northwest of Thomson.[77][78] By the end of 1937, the segment of SR 70 from Lincolnton to the South Carolina state line had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[22][23] In 1938, a small portion of the highway southwest of Lincolnton had a "completed hard surface".[23][27] Late in 1941, all of SR 70 was redesignated as SR 43.[30][31]

State Route 72[edit]

State Route 72
Location: WoodlandCovington
Existed: 1930[11][50]–1941[30][31]

State Route 72 (SR 72) was a state highway in the west-central and central parts of the state. It was established in 1930 on a path from US 19/SR 3 north-northwest of Thomaston to SR 18 in Barnesville.[11][50] Later that year, the western terminus was shifted southward into Thomaston.[50][51] At the end of 1933, SR 72 was extended northeast to Jackson.[79][80] A few months later, it was extended again, this time north-northeast to Covington.[78][58] Three years later, the entire length of the Thomaston–Barnesville segment had a "completed hard surface".[81][24] Later that year, SR 72 was extended southwest to SR 41 in Woodland.[24][22] The next year, the eastern terminus was under construction.[23][27] By the middle of 1939, the then-western terminus had a completed hard surface. At this time, the then-eastern terminus had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[27][73] Near the end of 1940, SR 72 was extended north-northwest along SR 41 to Manchester and then west-northwest to SR 85 in Warm Springs. It was possibly also extended west-southwest to US 27/SR 1 in Pine Mountain, but GDOT maps didn't show a highway number for this segment of highway. The entire extension had a completed hard surface. Meanwhile, the eastern terminus was under construction.[28][29] By the end of the year, the eastern terminus had a completed hard surface.[29][64] A few months later, the entire Newton County portion that didn't have a hard surface was under construction.[64][41] By the end of 1941, the entire highway was redesignated as SR 36. The Newton County portion that didn't have a hard surface had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[30][31]

State Route 73W[edit]

State Route 73W
Location: Bulloch County
Existed: 1960[5][16]–1993[82][83]

State Route 73W (SR 73W) was a state highway that existed in the southwestern part of Bulloch County. Between July 1957 and June 1960, it was established and paved between two intersections with US 25/US 301/SR 73. It traveled north-northwest to an intersection with SR 46 and then northeast to its northern terminus.[5][16] In 1993, it was decommissioned.[82][83]

The entire route was in Bulloch County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
US 25 / US 301 / SR 73 south / SR 73E north Southern terminus of SR 73W and SR 73E; northern terminus of southern segment of SR 73
SR 46
US 25 / US 301 / SR 73 north / SR 73E south Northern terminus of SR 73W and SR 73E; southern terminus of northern segment of SR 73
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 73E[edit]

State Route 73E
Location: Bulloch County
Existed: 1960[5][16]–1993[82][83]

State Route 73E (SR 73E) was a state highway that existed in the southwestern part of Bulloch County. Between July 1957 and June 1960, it was established on US 25/US 301 as a redesignation of SR 73. It straddled the intersection with SR 46/SR 119.[5][16] In 1993, it was reverted to be part of SR 73.[82][83]

The entire route was in Bulloch County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
US 25 / US 301 / SR 73 south / SR 73W north Southern terminus of SR 73W and SR 73E; northern terminus of southern segment of SR 73
SR 46 / SR 119
US 25 / US 301 / SR 73 north / SR 73W south Northern terminus of SR 73W and SR 73E; southern terminus of northern segment of SR 73
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 82 (1930–1941)[edit]

State Route 82
Location: AthensComer
Existed: 1930[50][51]–1941[30][31]

State Route 82 (SR 82) was a state highway that existed from the northern part of Athens to Comer, when it was established in 1930. It had previously been a temporary western terminus of SR 36 before being redesignated as SR 82.[50][51] In 1941, all of SR 82 and the Comer–South Carolina segment of SR 36 had been redesignated as SR 72.[30][31]

State Route 82 (1940–1970)[edit]

State Route 82
Location: Elbert County
Existed: 1940[29][64]–1970[47][43]

State Route 82 (SR 82) was a short state highway that existed entirely within Elbert County. At the end of 1940, it was established from SR 77 northeast of Elberton east to the South Carolina state line east-northeast of the city.[29][64] By the end of 1941, the entire highway had a "completed hard surface".[30][31] In 1943, the eastern terminus of SR 82 was shifted north-northwest on the South Carolina state line to a point southeast of Hartwell. This new path also had a completed hard surface.[45][63] In 1970, it was redesignated as SR 368.[47][43]

State Route 85W[edit]

State Route 85W
Location: South of ShilohWoodbury
Existed: 1952[13][32]–1995[84][85]

State Route 85W (SR 85W) was a state highway that existed from south of Shiloh to Woodbury. The highway that would eventually become SR 85W was established in 1930 as part of SR 85 from south of Shiloh to SR 41 in Warm Springs.[11][50] By the middle of 1933, the portion of the highway from south of Shiloh to Warm Springs had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[54][86] The next year, the segment of the highway just south-southwest of Warm Springs was shifted westward to a curve into the city.[58][59] At the end of 1936, two segments were under construction: around Shiloh and just west-southwest of Warm Springs.[72][87] By the middle of 1937, a portion from south of Shiloh to Warm Springs was under construction.[81][24] Near the end of the year, part of the Waverly Hall–Warm Springs segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[24][22] By the end of 1939, the segment from south of Shiloh to Warm Springs had a completed hard surface.[74][75]

In 1940, SR 163 was built from Warm Springs to Woodbury.[28][29] By the middle of 1941, SR 163's segment just northeast of Warm Springs was under construction.[41][30] In 1942, a portion of SR 163 northeast of Warm Springs had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[31][45] By the end of 1946, SR 85 was shifted eastward to a more direct path between Columbus and Manchester. Its old path between south of Shiloh and Warm Springs was redesignated as a southerly extension of SR 163.[6][7]

By the middle of 1950, US 27 Alt. was designated on SR 163 from south of Shiloh to Warm Springs.[12][13] By 1952, SR 163 was redesignated as SR 85W.[13][32] That year, SR 85W's segment south of Warm Springs was reverted to being designated as SR 163.[32][33] The next year, this was undone. Also, the segment of SR 85W from Warm Springs to Woodbury had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[33][25]

Between 1960 and 1963, US 27 Alt. was shifted eastward onto SR 85E from south of Shiloh to Manchester.[16][20] About thirty-three years later, SR 85W was redesignated SR 85 Alt.[84][85]

State Route 85E[edit]

State Route 85E
Location: South of ShilohWoodbury
Existed: 1957[4][5]–1995[84][85]

State Route 85E (SR 85E) was a state highway between south of Shiloh and Woodbury. In 1935, SR 85 was extended southeast on SR 41 to Manchester and then north-northeast through Woodbury.[68][69] At the end of 1936, part of SR 85 around Shiloh was under construction.[72][87]

In 1940, SR 85, from Manchester to approximately halfway between it and Woodbury, was under construction.[28][29] At the end of 1941, a portion of SR 85 just east-northeast of Manchester had a completed hard surface. At this time, a portion of the highway from south of Woodbury had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[30][31] In 1943, a portion northeast of Manchester had a completed hard surface.[45][63] The next year, a portion south of Woodbury had a sand clay or top soil surface.[63][6] By the end of 1946, SR 85 was shifted eastward to a more direct path between Columbus and Manchester. Its old path between south of Shiloh and Warm Springs was redesignated as a southerly extension of SR 163. The entire length of SR 85 from south of Shiloh to Chalybeate Springs had a completed hard surface. A small portion north-northeast of Chalybeate Springs had a sand clay or top soil surface; the portion from there to Woodbury had a completed hard surface.[6][7] Between 1946 and 1948, the Chalybeate Springs–Woodbury segment had a completed hard surface.[7][17]

Between 1955 and 1957, SR 85 from south of Shiloh to Woodbury was redesignated as SR 85E.[4][5] Between 1960 and 1963, US 27 Alt. was shifted eastward onto SR 85E from south of Shiloh to Manchester.[16][20] About thirty-two years later, SR 85E was redesignated as part of the SR 85 mainline again.[84][85]

State Route 86[edit]

State Route 86
Location: LumpkinFannin counties
Existed: 1930[50][51]–1940[29][64]

State Route 86 (SR 86) was a short-lived state highway in the North Georgia mountains region of the north-central part of the state. In 1930, SR 86 was established from Blue Ridge northeast to the North Carolina state line west-northwest of Ivy Log.[50][51] In January 1932, the entire length of SR 86 was under construction.[52][55] The next month, the western terminus of SR 86 was shifted eastward to begin northwest of Morganton.[55][88] By mid-1933, the portion of SR 86 from northwest of Morganton to Mineral Bluff had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[54][86] Later that year, the entire length of SR 86 had a completed semi hard surface.[89][90] In 1936, the entire length of SR 86 was under construction.[71][72] At the beginning of 1937, SR 86 was extended southeast to US 19/SR 9 in Porter Springs.[87][81] A few months later, SR 86's original segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[81][24] In late 1940, all of SR 86 was redesignated as SR 60.[29][64] About 37 years later, the original segment of SR 86, from Mineral Bluff to the state line was used for the path of SR 60 Spur.[48][49]

State Route 91W[edit]

State Route 91W
Location: Dougherty County
Existed: 1946[6][7]–1973[14][15]

State Route 91W (SR 91W) was a state highway in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Georgia. It functioned like an alternate route of SR 91. Between the beginning of 1945 and November 1946, it was established from SR 91 south-southwest of Albany to SR 3W just west of the city.[6][7] By February 1948, the entire length of the highway was hard surfaced.[7][17] In 1973, SR 234 was extended to the east, absorbing all of SR 91W.[14][15]

State Route 105[edit]

State Route 105
Location: Rabun County
Existed: 1932[56][57]–1937[22][23]

State Route 105 (SR 105) was a state highway that existed entirely within Rabun County in the northeastern part of the state. The road that would eventually become SR 105 was established at least as early as 1919 between the North Carolina and South Carolina state lines.[8] By 1921, the highway was signed as SR 65.[8][9] By February 1932, the entire length of SR 65 had a "completed hard surface".[52][55] Near the end of the year, all of SR 65 was redesignated as SR 105.[56][57] By the end of 1934, the entire length of SR 105 was under construction.[58][59] By the middle of 1937, SR 105 had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[81][24] Before 1938, all of SR 105 was redesignated as the northern segment of SR 28.[22][23]

State Route 131[edit]

State Route 131
Location: GlynnMcIntosh counties
Existed: 1936[76][71]–1989[21][91]

State Route 131 (SR 131) was a state highway that was located in Glynn and McIntosh counties in the coastal part of the state. The highway that would eventually become SR 131 was established between 1919 and 1921 as SR 60 from SR 27 north-northwest of Brunswick to SR 25 south-southwest of Darien.[8][9] By the end of 1926, it was decommissioned.[9][10] SR 131 was established in 1936 on what is currently SR 99 on an eastern curve between intersections with US 17/SR 25 in Darien and Eulonia.[76][71] Later that year, the portion from Darien to approximately Meridian was under construction.[71][72] In 1938, this segment had a "completed hard surface". From approximately Meridian to approximately Valona, the highway had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[23][27] In late 1939, SR 131 was established on a segment from US 84/SR 50 west-northwest of Brunswick to SR 32 northwest of Brunswick and on a segment from US 25/US 341/SR 27 southwest of Darien to US 17/SR 25 south-southwest of Darien. However, there is no indication if these were separate segments of the highway or extensions. The segment from approximately Valona to Eulonia was under construction.[74][75] A few months later, the northern terminus of the southern segment was shifted eastward to a southwest–northeast routing. Also, the western terminus of the central segment was shifted south-southwest to connect with SR 32 at US 25/US 341/SR 27 north-northwest of Brunswick.[75][28] By the end of 1941, the southern segment was under construction. The central segment was indicated to be "on system–not marked or maintained". The Valona–Eulonia segment of the northern segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[30][31] In 1943, the entire length of all three segments of SR 131 were redesignated as an extension of SR 99. SR 131 was moved to an alignment from South Newport to east-northeast of it. The entire length of this new segment had a completed hard surface.[45][63] By the end of 1946, the highway was extended east-southeast to the Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge. This extension had a completed hard surface.[6][7] By the end of the decade, SR 131 was extended west-southwest to Jones.[17][12] In 1953, the entire length of this extension had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[33][25] About a decade later, this segment was hard surfaced.[20][37] In 1977, it was decommissioned.[48][49] Twelve years later, the eastern part was decommissioned, as well.[21][91]

State Route 134[edit]

State Route 134
Location: TelfairWheeler counties
Existed: 1937[87][81]–1988[21][19]

State Route 134 (SR 134) was a state highway that was located in Telfair and Wheeler counties. It was established in early 1937 from US 341/SR 27 southwest of Towns to SR 15 in Jordan.[87][81] This segment of highway remained virtually unchanged for over a decade, when it was given a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[7][17] By early 1949, SR 134 was established on a segment from SR 149 south-southeast of McRae to US 341/SR 27 northwest of Lumber City. However, there is no indication if the two segments were separate or were connected via a concurrency with US 341/SR 27 between them.[17][12] By the middle of 1950, US 23 was designated on US 341/SR 27 between the two segments.[12][13] In 1953, the original segment of SR 134 had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[33][25] The next year, this segment was hard surfaced.[25][3] Between 1957 and 1960, SR 15 at this segment's eastern end was shifted farther to the east. Its former path was redesignated as part of SR 19.[5][16] Between 1960 and 1963, the newer segment of SR 134 was paved.[16][20] It wasn't until 1988 that the entire length of the highway was decommissioned.[19][21]

State Route 143[edit]

State Route 143
Location: Dade, Walker, Gordon, and Pickens counties
Length: 61.044 mi[40] (98.241 km)
Existed: 1937[87][81]–1977[48][49]

State Route 143 (SR 143) was a state highway in the northwestern and north-central parts of the state.

The roadway that would eventually become SR 143 was established at least as early as 1919 as part of SR 1 from LaFayette to Trenton.[8] By the end of 1921, SR 1 west of LaFayette was shifted to the east and off its former alignment. SR 53 was indicated to be a "contingent road" from LaFayette to Calhoun, with a concurrency with SR 1 in LaFayette.[8][9] By the end of 1926, a portion of SR 53 northwest of Calhoun had a "completed semi hard surface".[9][10] The decade ended with SR 53's path west of Calhoun being shifted farther to the south. The segment of SR 53 that had existed from LaFayette to Villanow was redesignated as part of SR 2.[10][11]

In 1930, the portion of SR 2 from approximately Naomi to Villanow had a completed semi hard surface.[50][51] In February 1932, this segment's eastern end was shifted slightly to the north.[55][88] In 1934, SR 2 was extended to an undetermined point northwest of LaFayette.[58][59] A few years later, SR 143 was established on SR 53's former path from Vilanow to Calhoun.[87][81] Later that year, SR 2 was extended farther to the northwest. Its southeast part (northwest of LaFayette) was under construction, while its northwest part had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[24][22] By the middle of 1939, SR 2 was extended northwest to its intersection with SR 157. The western two-thirds of its length in this area had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[27][73] Near the end of the year, SR 2 was extended north-northwest to an intersection with US 11/SR 58 in Trenton. The eastern part of this extension was under construction.[74][75]

In early 1940, this last extension of SR 2 had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[75][28] Around the middle of the year, the portions of SR 2 both north-northwest and east-southeast of the SR 157 intersection had a "completed hard surface".[28][29] The next year, nearly the entire portion of SR 2 from just south-southeast of Trenton to just southeast of Cooper Heights had a completed hard surface.[64][41] Later that year, SR 143 was designated on an eastern alignment from SR 53 east of Fairmount to SR 5 and SR 53 in Tate.[41][30] By the end of 1946, SR 2 was extended to the Alabama state line. Also, its segment from LaFayette to Villanow was hard surfaced.[6][7] By early 1948, all of SR 2 west-southwest of Trenton, the entire western segment of SR 143, and the eastern half of the eastern segment of SR 143, had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface. The western half of its eastern segment was indicated to be "projected mileage".[7][17] By the middle of 1949, SR 2 was shifted much farther to the north. Its former alignment from the Alabama state line to Villanow was redesignated as a western extension of the western segment of SR 143. A portion northwest of LaFayette was hard surfaced.[17][12]

By the middle of 1950, a portion just east-southeast of Trenton was hard surfaced.[12][13] In 1953, the portion west-southwest of Trenton and the portion from Sugar Valley to Calhoun were hard surfaced. The eastern segment's portion east of the SR 156 intersection had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[33][25] The next year, this last segment was hard surfaced.[25][3] By mid-1955, the Gordon County segment of the western segment (from Villanow to Sugar Valley) and the portion of the eastern segment (west of the SR 156 intersection) had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[3][4]

By the end of 1960, the entire western segment was hard surfaced. Nearly the entire part of the eastern segment west of the SR 156 intersection was decommissioned.[5][16] By the end of 1963, the decommissioned part of the eastern segment was re-instated.[16][20] In 1970, a portion of the eastern segment southeast of the SR 53 intersection was hard surfaced.[47][43] In 1973, the portion of the eastern segment was decommissioned was indicated to be "under construction or projected mileage".[14][15] In 1977, all of the western segment from the Alabama state line to northwest of Sugar Valley was redesignated as part of SR 136. All of the western segment from northwest of Sugar Valley to Calhoun was redesignated as SR 136 Conn. The eastern segment from its western terminus to northeast of Sharp Top was redesignated as SR 379; northeast of this point to west of Tate was redesignated as part of SR 108; and from there to Tate was redesignated as SR 108 Conn.[48][49]

State Route 143 Connector[edit]

State Route 143 Connector
Location: Gordon
Existed: 1972[44][14]–1977[48][49]

State Route 143 Connector (SR 143 Conn.) was a connecting route in the northwestern part of the state.

The roadway that would eventually become SR 143 Conn. was established between 1963 and 1966 as an unnumbered road from SR 143 northwest of Sugar Valley to Resaca.[20][37] In 1972 it was designated as SR 143 Conn., ending at US 41/SR 3.[44][14] In 1977, all of SR 143 west of a point northwest of Sugar Valley and all of SR 143 Conn. were redesignated as parts of SR 136.[48][49]

State Route 148 (1939–1949)[edit]

State Route 148
Location: Fort OglethorpeRinggold
Existed: 1939[27][73]–1949[17][12]

State Route 148 (SR 148) was a state highway in the northwestern part of the state. The highway that would eventually become SR 148 was established between 1919 and the end of 1921 as an unnumbered road from SR 1 in Fort Oglethorpe to SR 3 in Ringgold.[8][9] By the end of 1926, US 41 was designated on SR 3. The entire length of the highway had a "completed semi hard surface".[9][10] In 1930, US 41W was designated on SR 1.[50][51] By the end of 1934, US 41W was decommissioned. It was redesignated as part of US 27.[59][67] By the middle of 1939, the unnumbered road was designated as SR 148.[27][73] 1940 ended with the entire length of SR 148 having a "completed hard surface".[29][64] By the end of 1949, SR 2 was shifted to the north, replacing the entire length of SR 148.[17][12]

State Route 148 (1955–1966)[edit]

State Route 148
Location: Monroe County
Existed: 1955[3][4]–1966[20][37]

State Route 148 (SR 148) was a state highway in the central part of the state. SR 148 was designated between the middle of 1954 and the middle of 1955 from SR 18 east-southeast of Forsyth to SR 87 eas of Bolingbroke. Its entire length had a "completed hard surface".[3][4] Between 1957 and 1960, Interstate 75 (I-75) and SR 401 were built on a northeastern bypass of Forsyth. The southern terminus of this bypass connected with the western terminus of SR 148.[5][16] Between 1960 and 1963, I-75 (and possibly SR 401) was extended southeast to just northeast of Bolingbroke, replacing SR 148 northwest of this point.[16][20] Between 1963 and the end of 1966, I-75 was extended southeast through the Macon area, replacing SR 148 from northeast of Bolingbroke to east of this community (between the I-475 interchange northwest of Bolingbroke and SR 19 Spur east of the community, I-75 was under construction). The remainder of SR 148 was redesignated as part of SR 19 Spur.[20][37]

State Route 154[edit]

State Route 154
Location: PickensDawson counties
Existed: 1939[74][75]–1946[6][7]

State Route 154 (SR 154) was a state highway in the north-central part of the state. It was established in late 1939 from an intersection with SR 156 in Blaine to SR 5 in Talking Rock.[74][75] The next year, it was under construction.[28][29] Before the year ended, it was established on an eastern alignment from SR 108 northeast of Jasper to SR 183 northwest of Dawsonville.[29][64] Around the middle of 1941, this new segment was under construction.[41][30] In 1942, the original segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[31][45] By the end of 1946, both segments of SR 154 were redesignated as parts of SR 136.[6][7]

State Route 158[edit]

State Route 158
Location: Tunnel HillVarnell
Existed: 1940[74][75]–1941[30][31]

State Route 158 (SR 158) was a state highway in the northwestern part of the state. In 1940, SR 158 was established from US 41/SR 3 in Tunnel Hill to SR 71 in Varnell.[75][28] At the end of the next year, it was redesignated as part of SR 201.[30][31]

State Route 160 (1940–1941)[edit]

State Route 160
Location: Treutlen County
Existed: 1940[75][28]–1941[30][31]

State Route 160 (SR 160) was a state highway in the central part of the state. In 1940, SR 160 was established from SR 78 south of Adrian to SR 46 west of Oak Park.[75][28] Later that year, SR 160's segment from south of Adrian to SR 56 northeast of Soperton had a "completed hard surface". The eastern part of the highway was under construction.[28][29] By the end of 1941, all of SR 160 was redesignated as SR 86, with the portion from northeast of Soperton to west of Oak Park having a completed hard surface.[30][31]

State Route 160 (1946–1995)[edit]

State Route 160
Location: ClaytonDeKalb counties
Length: 5.7 mi[citation needed] (9.2 km)
Existed: 1946[6][7]–1995[84][85]

State Route 160 (SR 160) was a state highway in northern Clayton and southwestern DeKalb counties. SR 160 was established from SR 54 in Forest Park to SR 42 south-southeast of Constitution.[6][7] By the end of 1949, it was extended south-southeast on SR 54 and then west-northwest to US 19/US 41/SR 3.[17][12] In 1995, the western segment was decommissioned completely, while the eastern segment was redesignated as SR 54 Conn.[84][85]

State Route 161[edit]

State Route 161
Location: CedartownCave Spring
Existed: 1939[27][73]–1963[16][20]

State Route 161 (SR 161) was a state highway in central Polk County and southwestern Floyd counties. Its southern terminus was in Cedartown. It proceeded northwest to Cave Spring to an intersection with US 411/SR 53. It was established with a "completed hard surface" in 1939.[27][73] Between 1960 and 1963, it was redesignated as part of an extended SR 100.[16][20]

State Route 163[edit]

State Route 163
Location: South of ShilohWoodbury
Existed: 1940[28][29]–1952[13][32]

State Route 163 (SR 163) was a state highway in the west-central part of the state. The highway that would eventually become SR 163 was established as SR 85 from south of Shiloh to SR 41 in Warm Springs.[11][50] By the middle of 1933, the entire highway had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[54][86] The next year, the segment of the highway just south-southwest of Warm Springs was shifted westward to a curve into the city.[58][59] At the end of 1936, two segments were under construction: around Shiloh and just west-southwest of Warm Springs.[72][87] By the middle of the year, a portion from south of Shiloh to Warm Springs was under construction.[81][24] Near the end of the year, the segment form south of Shiloh to Warm Springs had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[24][22] 1939 ended with the segment from south of Shiloh to Warm Springs having a completed hard surface.[74][75]

In 1940, SR 163 was built from Warm Springs to Woodbury.[28][29] By the middle of 1941, SR 163's segment just northeast of Warm Springs was under construction.[41][30] In 1942, a portion of SR 163 northeast of Warm Springs had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[31][45] By the end of 1946, SR 85 was shifted eastward to a more direct path between Columbus and Manchester. Its old path between south of Shiloh and Warm Springs was redesignated as a southerly extension of SR 163.[6][7]

By the middle of 1950, US 27 Alt. was designated on SR 163 from south of Shiloh to Warm Springs.[12][13] By 1952, SR 163 was redesignated as SR 85W.[13][32]

State Route 167[edit]

State Route 167
Location: Chatham, Effingham, Screven, Jenkins counties
Existed: 1940[75][28]–1955[3][4]

State Route 167 (SR 167) was a state highway that existed on a southeast-to-northwest path from the Savannah metropolitan area to Millen. In early 1940, the highway was established on a path from US 17/SR 25 southwest of Savannah and then north-northwest to US 280/SR 26 west-northwest of the city.[75][28] In 1942, US 280 was truncated to the west-northwest; its path through this area was redesignated as an east-southeast extension of US 80. SR 167 was extended west-northwest on US 80/SR 26 to just west-northwest of the ChathamEffingham county line and then on a solo path to the north-northwest to the Effingham–Screven county line. The original segment was indicated to be "on system–not marked or maintained". The entire concurrency with US 80/SR 26 and its solo trek from there to Guyton had a "completed hard surface".[31][45] The next year, SR 167 was extended northwest to Millen.[45][63] In 1944, a small portion of the highway north-northwest of Guyton had a completed hard surface.[63][6] By the end of 1948, the original segment was indicated to have "projected mileage". A small portion between Guyton and Egypt had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface. Another small portion northwest of that one had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[7][17] By 1952, the segment northwest of US 80/SR 26 was redesignated as a southeast extension of SR 17, with a portion southeast of Millen having completed grading, but not being surfaced.[13][32] By the middle of 1955, the original segment of SR 167 was decommissioned.[3][4]

State Route 170[edit]

State Route 170
Location: DadeWalker counties
Existed: 1940[29][64]–1974[15][34]

State Route 170 (SR 170) was a state highway that was located in the northwestern part of the state, in Dade and Walker counties. At the end of 1940, it was established on a path from SR 157 south-southeast of Trenton east-south to a point just west of SR 193 southeast of the city.[29][64] About a year later, the entire length was under construction.[30][31] In 1945, the eastern terminus was shifted north-northwest to end at an intersection with SR 193 east-northeast of Trenton.[6][7] By the end of 1948, the eastern terminus of the highway was truncated to end at a point east of Trenton.[7][17] By the end of 1951, the eastern terminus was extended north-northeast and then northwest to end at another intersection with SR 157 west of Chattanooga Valley. This made the "eastern" terminus now the "northern" one. Most of this extension had a "sand clay, topsoil, or stabilized earth" surface. The northern part of it had completed grading, but was not surfaced. The portion east of the southern terminus was hard surfaced.[13][32] In 1953, the entire extension had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[33][25] By mid-1955, it had a sand clay, topsoil, or stabilized earth surface.[3][4] By the middle of 1957, this extension had a "topsoil or gravel, unpaved" surface.[4][5] Between 1960 and the end of 1963, the northern part of the extension was paved.[16][20] At the end of the decade, the entire length of SR 170 was hard surfaced.[66][46] In 1974, SR 157 was shifted eastward, replacing all of the north–south portion of SR 170, with the old alignment being redesignated as SR 189. The east–west portion of SR 170 was simply decommissioned.[15][34]

State Route 175[edit]

State Route 175
Location: LowndesLanier counties
Existed: 1940[28][29]–1969[46][47]

State Route 175 (SR 175) was a state highway that existed in the south-central part of the state, in Lowndes and Lanier counties. In 1940, it was established from SR 122 and SR 125 in Barretts to US 84/SR 38 in Naylor.[28][29] By the end of 1948, a portion of the highway from east-southeast of Barretts (at the Lowndes–Lanier county line) to west-northwest of the SR 31 intersection northwest of Naylor had completed grading, but was not surfaced. From this point to the second crossing of the county line it had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[7][17] About five years later, the western terminus was truncated to a point west-northwest of the SR 31 intersection.[33][25] By the middle of 1955, it was further truncated to the intersection with US 221/SR 31.[3][4] By the end of 1963, the entire remaining segment of highway had a "topsoil or gravel, unpaved" surface.[16][20] In 1969, SR 175 was decommissioned.[46][47]

State Route 176[edit]

State Route 176
Location: Cobb County
Length: 15 mi[94] (24 km)
Existed: 1940[29][64]–2010[92][93]

State Route 176 (SR 176) was a state highway in the northwestern part of the state. In late 1940, it was established from SR 120 in Lost Mountain to SR 92 in New Hope.[29][64] In 1942, the highway was extended south-southeast to SR 6 in Powder Springs. The extension was indicated to be "on system–not marked or maintained".[31][45] The next year, the southern part of the extension had a "completed hard surface".[45][63] By the end of 1948, the entire length of the extension was hard surfaced. A portion of the original segment just west of Lost Mountain had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[7][17] By the middle of 1950, this portion was hard surfaced.[12][13] In 1953, a portion west of Lost Mountain had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[33][25] Two years later, the New Hope–Lost Mountain segment had a sand clay, topsoil, or stabilized earth surface.[3][4] By the middle of 1957, this segment was indicated to have a "topsoil or gravel, unpaved" surface.[4][5] Before the decade ended, the New Hope–Lost Mountain segment was paved. Also, an unnumbered road was built from Lost Mountain to US 41/SR 3 in Acworth.[5][16] In 1969, the New Hope-to-Lost Mountain segment was shifted to the northeast onto this unnumbered road. Its former alignment was redesignated as SR 92 Conn.[46][47] In 2010, SR 176 was decommissioned.[92][93]

This table shows the last alignment of the highway. The entire route was in Cobb County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
Powder Springs US 278 / SR 6 – Hiram, Lithia Springs Southern terminus
Macland SR 360 – Dallas, Marietta
Lost Mountain SR 120 – Dallas, Marietta
Acworth US 41 / SR 3 – Cartersville, Kennesaw Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 179[edit]

State Route 179
Location: CalvaryVada
Existed: 1940[29][64]–1987[18][19]

State Route 179 (SR 179) was a state highway that existed in the southwestern part of the state. It traversed Grady and Baker counties. At the end of 1940, SR 179 was established from SR 111 in Calvary to US 84/SR 38 in Whigham.[29][64] In 1942, it was extended north-northwest to just north of the Grady–Mitchell county line, and then west to SR 97 in Vada. The entire highway was indicated as being "on system–not marked or maintained".[31][45] By the end of 1949, SR 262 was established on the Grady–Mitchell county line, replacing the east–west part of SR 179.[17][12] By the middle of 1950, a portion north-northwest of Whigham was hard surfaced. Two small portions between Whigham and the Grady–Mitchell county line had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[12][13] By the end of 1951, the southern two thirds of this segment was hard surfaced. A portion south-southeast of Whigham had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[13][32] The next year, this portion near Whigham was hard surfaced.[32][25] By the middle of 1954, the entire Calvary–Whigham segment was hard surfaced. A portion south of the SR 262 intersection was shifted eastward and had a sand clay, topsoil, or stabilized earth surface.[25][3] About a year later, this portion was hard surfaced.[3][4] In 1987, SR 179 was decommissioned.[18][19]

State Route 179 Connector[edit]

State Route 179 Connector
Location: Near AmsterdamCalvary
Existed: 1969[46][47]–1987[18][19]

State Route 179 Connector (SR 179 Conn.) was a connector route of SR 179 that existed in the southwestern part of the state. In 1969, it was established between US 27/SR 1 east-southeast of Amsterdam to SR 111 and SR 179 in Calvary.[46][47] In 1987, SR 179 Conn. was decommissioned.[18][19]

State Route 181[edit]

State Route 181
Location: Social Circle
Existed: 1940[29][64]–1941[30][31]

State Route 181 (SR 181) was a short-lived state highway that existed entirely in Walton County. The roadway that would eventually become SR 181 was built between 1921 and the end of 1926 as an unnumbered road from SR 11 in Social Circle to SR 12 southeast of the city. The entire length of this road had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[9][10] In 1930, this road was designated as the entire length of SR 60.[50][51] At the end of 1940, it was redesignated as SR 181.[29][64] At the end of 1941, it was redesignated as SR 213.[30][31]

State Route 205[edit]

State Route 205
Location: Cherokee County
Existed: 1948[7][17]–1985[1][2]

State Route 205 (SR 205) was a state highway that existed in the north-central part of the state. It was assigned to Bells Ferry Road in Cherokee County. Between 1946 and the end of 1948, it was established between SR 92 at a point southwest of Canton and SR 5 in the city.[7][17] By the middle of 1955, all of the highway except for the southern terminus was hard surfaced. The portion at the southern terminus had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[3][4] About two years later, this southern part was paved.[4][5] In 1970, SR 92's segment between Acworth and Woodstock was shifted southward, and SR 205 was extended southward on SR 92's old alignment to SR 92's new path.[47][43] In 1985, it was decommissioned.[1][2]

State Route 207[edit]

State Route 207
Location: Oconee County
Length: 2.1 mi[citation needed] (3.4 km)
Existed: 1942[31][45]–1983[95][1]

State Route 207 (SR 207) was a 2.1-mile-long (3.4 km) state highway that existed in the central part of the state, completely within Oconee County. It is now known as Hog Mountain Road. In 1942, SR 207 was established from SR 53 west-northwest of Watkinsville to US 129/SR 15/SR 24 north-northeast of the city. Its entire length was indicated to be "on system–not marked or maintained".[31][45] The next year, the entire highway had a "completed hard surface".[45][63] In 1983, it was decommissioned.[95][1]

State Route 209[edit]

State Route 209
Location: Oconee County
Existed: 1942[31][45]–1983[95][1]

State Route 209 (SR 209) was a state highway in the Athens area. It existed entirely within Oconee County. In 1942, it was established from US 78/SR 10 southwest of Bogart, north-northwest to US 29/SR 8 in Bogart, and then northeast to the Oconee–Clarke county line. This northern terminus was just south-southeast of the Oconee–Clarke–BarrowJackson county quadripoint. The entire length of the highway was indicated to be "on system–not marked or maintained".[31][45] The next year, the southern half of the highway had a "completed hard surface".[45][63] By the end of 1946, the southern terminus was shifted to another intersection with US 78/SR 10, but at a point south-southeast of Bogart. The entire length of this new part was hard surfaced. The northern terminus was truncated to the US 29/SR 8 intersection in Bogart.[6][7] In 1983, SR 209 was decommissioned.[95][1]

State Route 210[edit]

State Route 210
Location: Lookout Mountain
Existed: 1941[30][31]–1977[48][49]

State Route 210 (SR 210) was a very short state highway that was located in Lookout Mountain. At the end of 1941, it was established from SR 157 and SR 193 just west of the city limits of Lookout Mountain and then east and northeast to the Tennessee state line, at the Chattanooga city limits.[30][31] The next year, the entire length of the highway had a "completed hard surface".[31][45] Between 1955 and the middle of 1957, it was shifted to a different alignment. It traveled from SR 157 northwest to the Tennessee state line, at the Lookout Mountain city limits. This new alignment was paved.[4][5] Between 1963 and 1966, the northern terminus was shifted slightly to the east. The highway then traveled on a south-southwest to north-northeast direction.[20][37] In 1977, SR 210 was redesignated as part of SR 189.[48][49]

State Route 213[edit]

State Route 213
Location: Walton, Newton, Jasper, Morgan counties
Existed: 1941[30][31]–1982[39][95]

State Route 213 (SR 213) was a state highway that existed in the central part of the state. It traversed parts of Walton, Newton, Jasper, and Morgan counties. The roadway that would eventually become SR 213 was built between 1921 and the end of 1926 as an unnumbered road from SR 11 in Social Circle to SR 12 southeast of the city. Its entire length had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[9][10] In 1930, it was designated as SR 60.[50][51] In 1937, part of SR 142 was established on a path from Farrar to Newborn.[24][22] At the end of 1940, SR 60 was redesignated as SR 181. The segment of SR 142 was under construction.[29][64] At the end of the next year, SR 181 was redesignated as SR 213.[30][31] In 1942, SR 142's segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[31][45] The next year, SR 213 was designated on a southern segment. It extended from SR 36 south-southwest of Covington, then southeast and east to SR 11 in Mansfield. It may have also been designated from Mansfield east-northeast to SR 142 in Newborn and then north-northwest to SR 12 east of Covington; however, these segments were not specifically designated on maps. The SR 142 segment had a sand clay or top soil surface.[45][63] By the end of 1946, the northern segment of SR 213 was redesignated as SR 229, which was also designated on the segment of roadway from Newborn to east of Covington. The Mansfield–Newborn segment of SR 213 was hard surfaced.[6][7] By the end of 1948, SR 213 was extended east-southeast from Newborn to SR 83 in Pennington. From its western terminus to just west-southwest of Mansfield, and from east-southeast of Newborn to Pennington, the highway had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface. From just west-southwest of Mansfield to east-southeast of Newborn, which included the SR 142 segment (with which SR 213 had a brief concurrency), it was hard surfaced.[7][17] In 1953, the segment of SR 213 from east-southeast of Newborn to Pennington was hard surfaced. From its western terminus to just west of Mansfield, it had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[33][25] Between 1955 and the middle of 1957, the western end of SR 213 was paved.[4][5] At the end of the 1950s, all of the highway was paved.[5][16] In 1982, SR 213 was decommissioned.[39][95]

State Route 213 Spur[edit]

State Route 213 Spur
Location: Pennington
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1982[39][95]

State Route 213 Spur (SR 213 Spur) was a spur route of SR 213 that existed entirely in Pennington, which is southwest of Madison, in Morgan County. Between 1960 and the end of 1963, SR 213 Spur was established in Pennington from SR 213 to SR 83.[16][20] In 1982, it was decommissioned.[39][95]

State Route 214[edit]

State Route 214
Location: Macon County
Existed: 1942[31][45]–1982[39][95]

State Route 214 (SR 214) was a state highway that existed in the central part of the state. It was entirely within Macon County. In 1942, it was established from SR 26 east-southeast of Fountainville to another intersection with SR 26 in Oglethorpe.[31][45] The next year, its entire length had a "completed hard surface".[45][63] The highway remained virtually unchanged for the next 40 years. In 1982, SR 214 was decommissioned.[39][95]

State Route 214 Bypass[edit]

State Route 214 Bypass
Location: Oglethorpe
Existed: 1965[20][37]–1982[39][95]

State Route 214 Bypass (SR 214 Byp.) was a bypass route of SR 214 just west of Oglethorpe. Between 1963 and 1966, it was established from SR 26/SR 49 southwest of the city to SR 214/SR 214 Spur northwest of it.[20][37] In 1982, SR 214 Byp. was decommissioned and redesignated as the southern part of SR 128 Byp.[39][95]

State Route 214 Spur[edit]

State Route 214 Spur
Location: Oglethorpe
Existed: 1965[20][37]–1982[39][95]

State Route 214 Spur (SR 214 Spur) was a spur route of SR 214 that existed mostly within the city limits of Oglethorpe. Between 1963 and 1966, SR 214 Spur was established from SR 214/SR 214 Byp. northwest of Oglethorpe to SR 90/SR 128 in the city.[20][37] In 1982, SR 214 Spur was decommissioned.[39][95]

State Route 217[edit]

State Route 217
Location: Macon County
Existed: 1942[31][45]–1969[46][47]

State Route 217 (SR 217) was a state highway that existed entirely within Macon County. In 1942, it was established from SR 128 north of Oglethorpe to SR 127 south-southeast of Reynolds.[31][45] Between 1963 and 1966, the entire length of the highway had a "topsoil or gravel" surface.[20][37] In 1969, SR 217 was decommissioned.[46][47]

State Route 218[edit]

State Route 218
Location: Walker and Catoosa counties
Existed: 1942[31][45]–1985[1][2]

State Route 218 (SR 218) was a short state highway that existed in Walker and Catoosa counties. It is currently known as Lakeview Drive. In 1942, it was established from US 27/SR 1 in Lakeview to SR 146 southeast of that city.[31][45] Between November 1946 and February 1948, the entire highway was hard surfaced.[7][17] In 1985, SR 218 was decommissioned.[1][2]

State Route 221[edit]

State Route 221
Location: Jasper County
Existed: 1943[45][63]–1983[95][1]

State Route 221 (SR 221) was a state highway that existed in the west-central part of Jasper County. In 1943, it was established from SR 16 west of Monticello to SR 11 in Prospect.[45][63] A decade later, the entire highway had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[33][25] Between 1957 and the end of 1960, the entire length was paved.[5][16] The highway remained virtually unchanged for the next two decades. In 1983, it was decommissioned.[95][1]

State Route 222[edit]

State Route 222
Location: Meriwether County
Existed: 1943[45][63]–1986[2][18]

State Route 222 (SR 222) was a short state highway that existed entirely within the southeastern part of Meriwether County. Today, it is known as Jesse Cole Road. In 1943, it was established from SR 85 east-northeast of Manchester to SR 173 north of that city. Its entire length had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[45][63] By the end of 1948, its entire length had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[7][17] Between 1955 and the middle of 1957, SR 85 was redesignated as SR 85E.[4][5] By the end of 1960, the entire length of SR 222 was paved.[5][16] In 1986, this highway was decommissioned.[2][18]

State Route 226[edit]

State Route 226
Location: Dawson and Hall counties
Existed: 1943[45][63]–1980[36][38]

State Route 226 (SR 226) was a state highway that existed in the north-central part of the state. It traversed parts of Dawson and Hall counties. In 1943, it was established from SR 53 to SR 9E at two different points northwest of Gainesville.[45][63] By the end of 1946, its entire length was hard surfaced.[6][7] Between 1957 and the end of 1960, the southern terminus was truncated to the Hall–Dawson county line.[5][16] Between 1963 and 1966, it was further truncated to a point just west of the county line.[20][37] In 1968, yet another truncation left the southern terminus at the northern shore of Lake Lanier.[66][46] In 1980, SR 226 was decommissioned.[36][38]

State Route 229[edit]

State Route 229
Location: Walton, Newton, Jasper counties
Existed: 1943[45][63]–1982[39][95]

State Route 229 (SR 229) was a state highway in the central part of the state. It traversed parts of Walton, Newton, and Jasper counties. The roadway that would eventually become SR 229 was an unnumbered road built between 1921 and the end of 1926 between SR 11 in Social Circle to SR 12 southeast of the city. Its entire length had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[9][10] In 1930, this road was designated as SR 60.[50][51] In 1937, part of SR 142 was established on a path from Farrar to Newborn.[24][22] At the end of 1940, SR 60 was redesignated as SR 181. The segment of SR 142 was under construction.[29][64] At the end of 1941, SR 181 was redesignated as SR 213.[30][31] The next year, the SR 142 segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[31][45] In 1943, SR 213 was designated on a southern alignment, which may have included a portion from Mansfield east-northeast to SR 142 in Newborn and then north-northwest to SR 12 east of Covington. However, these segments were not indicated on maps. The SR 142 segment had a sand clay or top soil surface. SR 229 was designated from SR 11 in Monticello to SR 142 north-northwest of Farrar. The southern part of this segment had a "completed hard surface"; its northern part had a sand clay or top soil surface.[45][63] By the end of 1946, the northern segment of SR 213 was redesignated as part of SR 229. It was also designated on a segment from Newborn to east of Covington; however, there was no indication if the three segments were connected by concurrencies with other highways or not. The northern portion of the segment from Monticello to north-northwest of Farrar had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[6][7] By the end of 1948, the SR 142 segment was hard surfaced. SR 229's segment from Newborn to east of Covington had a sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth surface.[7][17] By the end of 1951, the northern segment of SR 229 was hard surfaced.[13][32] The portion from Monticello to north-northwest of Farrar was also hard surfaced.[33][25] Between 1957 and the end of 1960, the portion from Newborn to east of Covington was paved.[5][16] In 1982, SR 229 was decommissioned.[39][95]

State Route 235[edit]

State Route 235
Location: Fulton County
Length: 2.2 mi[citation needed] (3.5 km)
Existed: 1944[45][63]–1963[16][20]

Former SR 235 was a 2.2-mile-long (3.5 km)[citation needed] loop road from SR 9 in what is now the Buckhead neighborhood of Atlanta. Heading south, it pulled off of SR 9 (Roswell Road) onto Habersham Road NW, turning left onto Chatham Road NW, following it to Andrews Drive NW, turning right onto Andrews Drive NW and following it until rejoining SR 9 (Peachtree Road). The road first appeared in 1944,[45][63] and was deleted between 1961 and 1963, when it was converted to a local road.[16][20][96]

State Route 238[edit]

State Route 238
Location: Troup County
Existed: 1946[6][7]–1975[34][97]

State Route 238 (SR 238) was a short state highway that existed in the west-central part of the state. It was entirely within Troup County. Between 1945 and the end of 1946, it was established from the Alabama state line west-southwest of LaGrange to US 29/SR 14 southwest of Lees Crossing.[6][7] By the end of 1948, the entire highway, except for the westernmost portion had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[7][17] The next year, the western terminus also had that same type of surface.[17][12] By the middle of 1950, all of the highway was hard surfaced.[12][13] In 1975, SR 238 was decommissioned.[34][97]

State Route 239[edit]

State Route 239
Location: Walker and Chattooga counties
Existed: 1946[6][7]–1976[97][48]

State Route 239 (SR 239) was a state highway that existed in the northwestern part of the state. It traversed the northwestern part of Walker County and the southwestern part of Chattooga County. Between 1945 and the end of 1946, it was established from SR 48 in Cloudland to SR 157 southeast of Rising Fawn. Its entire length was hard surfaced.[6][7] Almost exactly 30 years later, the southern portion of SR 157 was shifted southeastward, replacing all of SR 239.[97][48]

State Route 244[edit]

State Route 244
Location: Troup County
Existed: 1948[7][17]–1975[34][97]

State Route 244 (SR 244) was a short state highway that existed in the west-central part of the state. It was completely within Troup County. Between 1946 and the end of 1948, it was established from the Alabama state line west-northwest of LaGrange to SR 109. Its entire length was hard surfaced.[7][17] In 1975, it was decommissioned.[34][97]

State Route 245[edit]

State Route 245
Location: Mineral BluffMcCaysville
Existed: 1948[7][17]–1977[48][49]

State Route 245 (SR 245) was a state highway in Fannin County. Between 1946 and 1948, SR 245 was designated from Mineral Bluff to McCaysville. Each terminus had a completed hard surface; the central part had a sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth surface.[7][17] The next year, the entire length of SR 245 was hard surfaced.[17][12] In 1977, SR 60's path from northwest of Morganton to the North Carolina state line was shifted westward, replacing all of SR 245. Its former path from Mineral Bluff to the state line was redesignated as SR 60 Spur.[48][49]

State Route 248[edit]

State Route 248
Location: Washington and Hancock counties
Existed: 1949[17][12]–1982[39][95]

State Route 248 (SR 248) was a state highway that existed in the east-central part of the state. It traversed the north-central portion of Washington County and the east-central portion of Hancock County. Between 1948 and the end of 1949, it was established from SR 102 north-northeast of Warthen to SR 16 in Jewell. The southern half of the highway had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[17][12] In 1953, this portion had completed grading, but was not surfaced. The Hancock County portion was hard surfaced.[33][25] Between 1955 and the middle of 1957, the entire highway was paved.[4][5] In 1982, it was decommissioned.[39][95]

State Route 249[edit]

State Route 249
Location: MurrayvilleDahlonega
Existed: 1949[17][12]–1957[4][5]

State Route 249 (SR 249) was a short-lived state highway. Between 1946 and 1948, an unnumbered road was built from Murrayville to Dahlonega; it had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[7][17] The next year, the unnumbered road between Murrayville and Dahlonega was designated as SR 249.[17][12] By the middle of 1950, all of SR 249 was hard surfaced.[12][13] By 1957, SR 60 was extended south-southwest on US 19/SR 9 into Dahlonega, then south-southeast to Gainesville, replacing all of SR 249.[4][5]

State Route 250[edit]

State Route 250
Location: Tattnall and Evans counties
Existed: 1949[17][12]–1985[1][2]

State Route 250 (SR 250) was a state highway that existed in Tattnall and Evans counties. The roadway that would eventually become SR 250 was established between 1945 and the end of 1946 as an eastern segment of SR 64 from US 25/SR 73 south of Claxton to US 280/SR 30 east-southeast of Daisy. This segment was indicated to be "projected mileage".[6][7] By the end of 1948, the southern terminus of this segment was completed grading, but was not surfaced.[7][17] By the end of 1949, SR 250 was established on a slightly different alignment. It began at an intersection with US 25/US 301/SR 73 south of Claxton, at a point farther south than the eastern segment of SR 64 did. Its eastern terminus was at SR 129 south-southeast of Claxton, in the northwestern part of Camp Stewart.[17][12] By the end of 1951, the portion of SR 64 on either side of the SR 250 intersection had a "sand clay, topsoil, or stabilized earth" surface.[13][32] In 1953, the entire Tattnall County portion of SR 64 had completed grading, but was not surfaced. The northern terminus of it was shifted westward to end in Daisy.[33][25] By the middle of 1957, SR 250 was shifted northwest, replacing the entire length of the eastern segment of SR 64.[4][5] By the end of 1963, the entire length of SR 250 was paved.[16][20] In 1985, SR 250 was decommissioned.[1][2]

State Route 258[edit]

State Route 258
Location: Troup County
Existed: 1949[17][12]–1965[20][37]

State Route 258 (SR 258) was a state highway that existed in the west-central part of the state. It was entirely within Troup County. Between February 1948 and April 1949, it was established from US 27/SR 1 west-northwest of Hogansville to US 29/SR 14 in that city.[17][12] In 1953, the entire length of the highway was hard surfaced.[33][25] Between June 1963 and the end of 1966, it was redesignated as a southern extension of SR 54.[20][37]

State Route 259[edit]

State Route 259
Location: TarboroAtkinson
Existed: 1949[17][12]–1980[35][36]

State Route 259 (SR 259) was a state highway in the southeastern part of the state. It traversed the northwestern part of Camden County and the southeastern part of Brantley County. Between February 1948 and April 1949, it was established from SR 252 in Tarboro to US 84/SR 50 in Atkinson. The Camden portion of the highway had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[17][12] Between 1963 and the end of 1966, the entire length had a "topsoil or gravel" surface.[20][37] In 1968, the northern half of the Brantley County portion was hard surfaced.[66][46] In 1978, the rest of the highway was hard surfaced.[49][35] At the beginning of 1980, SR 259 was decommissioned.[35][36]

State Route 261[edit]

State Route 261
Location: Long County
Existed: 1949[17][12]–1981[38][39]

State Route 261 (SR 261) was a state highway that existed in the eastern part of the state. It was entirely within Long County. Between February 1948 and April 1949, it was established from the Altamaha River on the Wayne–Long county line to US 25/US 301/SR 23 south of Glennville.[17][12] By August 1950, it was extended northeast to an intersection with SR 196 at a point south-southeast of Glennville.[12][13] By the end of 1951, the southern terminus of the highway was shifted northwest to be just north-northwest of the Wayne–Long–Tattnall county tripoint.[13][32] In 1952, the southern terminus of SR 261 was reverted to its former location. The northern half of the highway had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[32][25] Between 1957 and the end of 1960, the southern terminus was truncated slightly to the northeast.[5][16] Between 1963 and the end of 1965, the southern terminus was once again reverted to its former location. At this time, the entire highway had a "topsoil or gravel" surface.[20][37] In 1967, the northern half was hard surfaced.[65][66] In 1981, SR 261 was decommissioned.[38][39]

State Route 263[edit]

State Route 263
Location: Taylor County
Existed: 1949[17][12]–1987[18][19]

State Route 263 (SR 263) was a state highway that existed in the central part of the state. It was entirely within Taylor County. Between February 1948 and April 1949, it was established from SR 128 north of Reynolds to US 19/SR 3 south-southwest of Salem.[17][12] In 1953, the southern half of the highway was hard surfaced.[33][25] By the middle of 1955, the northern half had a "sand clay, topsoil, or stabilized earth" surface.[3][4] By mid-1957, this segment was paved.[4][5] In 1987, SR 263 was decommissioned.[18][19]

State Route 265[edit]

State Route 265
Location: Telfair County
Existed: 1949[17][12]–1976[97][48]

State Route 265 (SR 265) was a very short state highway that existed in the south-central part of the state. It was entirely within Telfair County. Between February 1948 and April 1949, it was established from SR 117 east-northeast of Jacksonville to SR 149 northeast of that town.[17][12] Between September 1953 and June 1954, the entire highway was hard surfaced.[25][3] In 1976, the portion of SR 149 south of the SR 265 intersection was shifted northeastward, replacing all of SR 265.[97][48]

State Route 267[edit]

State Route 267
Location: Marion and Talbot counties
Existed: 1950[12][13]–1997[98][99]

State Route 267 (SR 267) was a short state highway that existed in the west-central part of the state. Between April 1949 and August 1950, it was established from SR 41 south of Geneva to US 80/SR 22 west-southwest of it. The entire length of the highway had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[12][13] In 1953, the northern terminus was shifted slightly to the west-southwest.[33][25] Between July 1957 and June 1960, the entire length was paved.[5][16] By the middle of 1963, the northern half of the highway was redesignated as part of SR 355.[16][20] In 1997, SR 267 was decommissioned.[98][99]

State Route 269[edit]

State Route 269
Location: Taliaferro County
Existed: 1950[12][13]–1983[95][1]

State Route 269 (SR 269) was a short state highway that existed in the east-central part of the state. The highway was completely within Taliaferro County; however, the southern part traveled on the Warren–Taliaferro county line. Between April 1949 and August 1950, the highway was established from SR 12 southeast of Crawfordville to SR 47 in Sharon. Its entire length had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[12][13] By the end of 1951, the entire highway was hard surfaced.[13][32] In 1983, SR 269 was decommissioned.[95][1]

State Route 276[edit]

State Route 276
Location: Long County
Existed: 1950[12][13]–1981[38][39]

State Route 276 (SR 276) was a short state highway that existed in the eastern part of the state. It was entirely within Long County. Between April 1949 and August 1950, it was established from a point west-northwest of Ludowici to US 25/US 301/SR 23 northwest of the city.[12][13] Between 1963 and 1966, the southern terminus was shifted slightly westward. At this time, the entire length of the highway had a "topsoil or gravel" surface.[20][37] In 1981, SR 276 was decommissioned.[38][39]

State Route 277[edit]

State Route 277
Location: Laurens County
Existed: 1950[12][13]–1960[5][16]

State Route 277 (SR 277) was a short-lived state highway that existed in the central part of the state. It was completely within Laurens County. Between April 1949 and August 1950, it was established from the Dodge–Laurens–Bleckley county tripoint to US 80/SR 19/SR 26 in Dublin. The entire Dexter–Dublin segment was hard surfaced.[12][13] Between September 1953 and June 1954, the southern terminus of the highway was truncated to just west of Dexter.[25][3] By the middle of 1955, the southern terminus was reverted to just south-southeast of its former location.[3][4] By mid-1957, the southern terminus was shifted to its original location.[4][5] By the middle of 1960, SR 277 was redesignated as an eastern extension of SR 257.[5][16]

State Route 287[edit]

State Route 287
Location: Taylor County
Length: 3.0 mi[citation needed] (4.8 km)
Existed: 1950[12][13]–1987[18][19]

State Route 287 (SR 287) was a short north–south state highway that existed in the central part of the state. It was completely within Taylor County. Between April 1949 and August 1950, SR 287 was established from a point just south of the Macon–Taylor county line southeast of Reynolds to SR 96 east of that city.[12][13] In 1952, the southern terminus was truncated to the county line.[32][33] The next year, the entire highway was hard surfaced.[33][25] By the middle of 1954, the southern terminus was truncated slightly.[25][3] By the middle of 1955, the southern terminus was reverted to the county line.[3][4] Near the end of the decade, the southern terminus was truncated again to the point that it was in 1954.[4][5] Between 1963 and 1966, the southern terminus was reverted once again to the county line.[20][37] In 1987, SR 287 was decommissioned.[18][19]

State Route 289[edit]

State Route 289
Location: Appling and Jeff Davis counties
Length: 9.0 mi[citation needed] (14 km)
Existed: 1951[13][32]–1980[35][36]

State Route 289 (SR 289) was a state highway that existed in the southeastern part of the state. It traveled along the ApplingJeff Davis county line. Between 1950 and 1952, it was established from US 23/SR 15 south-southwest of Graham to US 341/SR 27 in the city.[13][32] In 1953, the central portion of the highway was shifted eastward to a more direct path between its termini. The portion of the highway north of the Big Satilla River had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[33][25] Between 1960 and the middle of 1963, the portion south of the river was given the same treatment.[16][20] In 1970, the portion north of the river was hard surfaced.[47][43] Between 1978 and March 1980, SR 289 was decommissioned.[35][36]

State Route 290[edit]

State Route 290
Location: Quitman County
Length: 2.0 mi[citation needed] (3.2 km)
Existed: 1951[13][32]–1981[38][39]

State Route 290 (SR 290) was a short north–south state highway that existed in the southwestern part of the state. It was entirely within Quitman County. Between 1950 and 1952, it was established as an S-shaped highway from Hatcher to US 82/SR 50 west-southwest of Springvale.[13][32] In 1952, the southern terminus was shifted westward. This put the highway on a nearly due north–south direction.[32][33] Between September 1953 and June 1954, the entire length of the highway was hard surfaced.[25][3] In 1981, SR 290 was decommissioned.[38][39]

State Route 291[edit]

State Route 291
Location: Quitman County
Length: 2.0 mi[citation needed] (3.2 km)
Existed: 1951[13][32]–1981[38][39]

State Route 291 (SR 291) was a short state highway that existed in the southwestern part of the state. It was located completely within Quitman County. Between August 1950 and the end of 1951, it was established as an S-shaped highway from Morris to US 82/SR 50 nearly due wet of Springvale.[13][32] In 1952, the southern terminus was shifted slightly. This put the highway on a nearly due southwest–northeast direction.[32][33] The next year, the southern terminus was shifted slightly to the northwest.[33][25] By the middle of 1954, the southern terminus was extended slightly to the west. The entire length of the highway was hard surfaced.[25][3] Between 1963 and 1966, the alignment of the highway was shifted to become a J-shaped highway.[20][37] In 1981, SR 291 was decommissioned.[38][39]

State Route 294[edit]

State Route 294
Location: Bartow County
Existed: 1957[4][5]–1965[20][37]

State Route 294 (SR 294) was a short state highway that existed in the northwestern part of the state. It traveled completely within Bartow County. The roadway that would eventually become SR 294 was established in 1952 as SR 294N from Allatoona Dam east of Cartersville to SR 20 northeast of the city.[32][33] The next year, the entire length of SR 294N was hard surfaced.[33][25] Between June 1955 and July 1957, it was redesignated as SR 294.[4][5] Between 1963 and 1966, it was again redesignated as SR 294N.[20][37] This roadway would eventually become SR 20 Spur.[83][84]

State Route 294N[edit]

State Route 294N
Location: Bartow County
Existed: 1952[32][33]–1957[4][5]

State Route 294N
Location: Bartow County
Existed: 1965[20][37]–1994[83][84]

State Route 294N (SR 294N) was a short state highway that existed in the northwestern part of the state. It traveled completely within Bartow County. It was established in 1952 from Allatoona Dam east of Cartersville to SR 20 northeast of the city.[32][33] The next year, all of SR 294N was hard surfaced.[33][25] Between June 1955 and July 1957, the highway was redesignated as SR 294.[4][5] Between 1963 and 1966, SR 294 was again redesignated as SR 294N.[20][37] In 1994, SR 294N was redesignated as SR 20 Spur.[83][84]

State Route 294S[edit]

State Route 294S
Location: Emerson
Existed: 1952[32][33]–1977[48][49]

State Route 294S (SR 294S) was a short state highway that existed in the northwestern part of the state. It traveled completely within Bartow County. Nearly the entire highway was within the city limits of Emerson. In 1952, it was established from US 41/SR 3 in Emerson to just west of Red Top Mountain State Park in the far northeastern part of the city.[32][33] The next year, the entire highway was hard surfaced.[33][25] By the middle of 1955, US 41/SR 3 in the area was shifted eastward; the western terminus of SR 294S was then at SR 293.[3][4] In 1977, SR 294S was decommissioned.[48][49]

State Route 295[edit]

State Route 295
Location: Atlanta
Existed: 1954[25][3]–1957[4][5]

State Route 295 (SR 295) was a short-lived state highway in the city of Atlanta. Between September 1953 and June 1954, it was established on what was listed on maps as simply "Expressway" (a predecessor of I-75/I-85/Downtown Connector) from US 19/US 41/SR 3 at Lakewood Avenue to University Avenue.[25][3] Between 1955 and the middle of 1957, it was decommissioned.[4][5]

State Route 300[edit]

State Route 300
Location: Jasper and Putnam counties
Length: 20.3 mi[100] (32.7 km)
Existed: 1960[5][16]–1982[39][95]

State Route 300 (SR 300) was a state highway that existed in the central part of the state. It followed a route between Monticello and US 129/US 441/SR 24, near the Rock Eagle State 4-H Club Center north of Eatonton. It was established in 1960.[5][16] Later that year, a small portion at the eastern terminus was paved.[16][20] By 1967, the section from its western terminus to the intersection with SR 142 was paved.[37][65] In 1970, the entire length of the highway was paved.[47][43] By 1983, the highway was decommissioned and given to local authority.[39][95]


County Location mi[100] km Destinations Notes
Jasper Monticello 0.0 0.0 SR 83 (Madison Street) – Forsyth, Madison Western terminus
Putnam Oconee National Forest 10.5 16.9 SR 142 (Shady Dale Road NW) – Willard, Shady Dale
20.3 32.7 US 129 / US 441 / SR 24 (Madison Road) Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 304[edit]

State Route 304
Location: Columbia County
Length: 6.0 mi[citation needed] (9.7 km)
Existed: 1957[4][5]–1987[18][19]

State Route 304 (SR 304) was a north–south state highway that was located in the east-central part of the state. It was completely within Columbia County. Between June 1955 and July 1957, it was established from US 221/SR 47 just north of Appling north-northeast to US 221/SR 104/SR 150 in Pollards Corner. It was completely concurrent with US 221. The entire length of US 221/SR 304 was paved.[4][5] In 1987, SR 47 between Appling and Leah was shifted eastward to travel concurrently with US 221. This necessitated a decommissioning of SR 304.[18][19]

State Route 312[edit]

State Route 312
Location: BainbridgeWhigham
Length: 15.4 mi[citation needed] (24.8 km)
Existed: 1960[5][16]–1980[36][38]

State Route 312 (SR 312) was an east–west state highway that was located in the southwestern part of the state. Between July 1957 and June 1960, it was established from US 27 Bus./US 84 Bus./SR 38 in Bainbridge to US 84/SR 38 in Whigham.[5][16] The portion of SR 312 from Bainbridge to SR 262 north-northeast of Climax was paved. From that point to Whigham had a "topsoil or gravel, unpaved" surface.[5][16] By the middle of 1963, the eastern part of the highway was also paved.[16][20] In 1980, SR 312 was decommissioned.[36][38]

State Route 318[edit]

State Route 318
Location: Dawson County
Length: 6.351 mi[40] (10.221 km)
Existed: 1960[5][16]–1985[1][2]

State Route 318 (SR 318) was a west–east state highway that existed in the north-central part of the state. It traveled completely within Dawson County. Between July 1957 and June 1960, it was established from the Dawson Demonstration Forest and Wildlife Management Area south-southwest of Dawsonville to SR 53 southeast of that city. The entire length of the highway was paved.[5][16] By the middle of 1963, it was extended south-southeast on a concurrency with SR 53, then solely east and southeast to War Hill Park northeast of Chestatee.[16][20] In 1971, the western terminus was truncated to SR 9 south of Dawsonville.[43][44] In 1980, the eastern terminus was truncated to SR 53.[36][38] In 1985, SR 318 was decommissioned.[1][2]

State Route 319[edit]

State Route 319
Location: Barrow and Jackson counties
Existed: 1960[5][16]–1990[91][101]

State Route 319 (SR 319) was a state highway that existed in the north-central part of the state. It traversed the northeastern part of Barrow County and the south-central part of Jackson County. Between July 1957 and June 1960, it was established from SR 211 north-northwest of Statham to US 129/SR 24 about halfway between Arcade and Jefferson.[5][16] The entire highway was paved at this time.[5][16] The highway was virtually unchanged for the next 30 years. In 1990, it was decommissioned.[91][101]

State Route 321[edit]

State Route 321
Location: Bryan and Bulloch counties
Existed: 1960[5][16]–1967[65][66]

State Route 321 (SR 321) was a short-lived state highway that existed in the eastern part of the state. It traversed the northwestern part of Bryan County and the southeastern part of Bulloch County. Between July 1957 and June 1960, it was established from US 280/SR 30/SR 63 in Pembroke north-northeast to SR 119 west-northwest of Blitchton.[5][16] The entire Bryan County portion was paved, while the entire Bulloch County portion had a "topsoil or gravel, unpaved" surface.[5][16] By the middle of 1963, the Bulloch County portion was paved. SR 321 was designated on a separate segment from US 80/SR 26 south-southeast of Stilson, then northeast and north-northwest to SR 119 southwest of Guyton. From the southern terminus of this segment to the turn to the north-northwest had a topsoil or gravel, unpaved surface; while the rest of it was paved. There was no indication if the two segments were connected via concurrencies with SR 119 and US 80/SR 26 or if they were two separate segments.[16][20] By the end of 1966, SR 119's segment at the northern terminus of the original segment was redesignated as part of SR 46. SR 321's southern segment was extended on a direct connection with the newer segment. The central portion of the newer segment was hard surfaced.[20][37] In 1967, SR 119 was re-routed southward, replacing all of SR 321. The former path of SR 119 through Stilson was redesignated as SR 119 Conn.[65][66]

State Route 322[edit]

State Route 322
Location: EmanuelToombs counties
Existed: 1960[5][16]–1966[20][37]

State Route 322 (SR 322) was a state highway in the central part of the state. Between 1957 and the end of 1960, it was established from US 1/SR 4/SR 46 in Oak Park then south-southeast to SR 292 east of Lyons.[5][16] In the middle of the 1960s, its entire length was redesignated as an eastern extension of SR 86.[20][37]

State Route 333[edit]

State Route 333
Location: Thomas, Mitchell, Dougherty, Lamar, Pike, Spalding, Henry, and Clayton counties
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1982[39][95]

State Route 333 (SR 333) was a north–south state highway that existed in two separate segments in the state. The highway traversed portions of Thomas, Mitchell, Dougherty, Lamar, Pike, Spalding, Henry, and Clayton counties.

Between June 1960 and June 1963, the highway was established on US 19 from the Florida state line to Camilla. This truncated SR 35, which was concurrent with US 19 from the Florida state line to Thomasville. The segment of US 19 between Thomasville and Meigs, with which SR 3 was concurrent was redesignated as US 19 Bus. SR 333 was established on a sole routing from Camilla to the eastern part of Albany, while US 19/SR 3 traveled on a slightly more western path. SR 333 was also established on US 19/US 41 from SR 16 in Griffin to an indeterminate location between Jonesboro and Hapeville. From Griffin to Lovejoy and in Jonesboro, SR 3 traveled on a more eastern path. Between Lovejoy and Jonesboro and from north-northwest of Jonesboro, US 19/US 41/SR 3/SR 333 traveled concurrently.[16][20] By 1966, US 19 between Camilla and Albany was shifted eastward to travel concurrently with SR 333. It was unclear if the northern terminus of SR 333 was truncated to Lovejoy or not.[20][37] That year, SR 333 was indicated to be "projected mileage" from an unnumbered road in the southern part of Barnesville, then west-northwest and north-northwest through Aldora, then north-northeast past US 41/SR 7, then north-northwest through Milner, then northwest and north-northwest past US 19/SR 3 south of Griffin, then north-northwest through the western part of Griffin to connect with the US 19/US 41/SR 3/SR 333 intersection with SR 92 in the northern part of the city.[37][65] The next year, US 341's path through the Barnesville–Aldora area was shifted southwestward to travel concurrently with SR 333 from just south of Barnesville to US 41/SR 7 Conn. just north of the city. SR 333 was indicated to be projected mileage and under construction from this intersection to the US 19/US 41/SR 3/SR 92/SR 333 intersection in Griffin.[65][66] In 1968, the highway was indicated to be projected mileage from the US 19/US 82/SR 50S/SR 333 and US 19/SR 3W intersections in Albany. The under construction segment from just north of Barnesville to south of Griffin was completed.[66][46] The next year, the portion of SR 333 from just north of Barnesville to Griffin was decommissioned.[46][47]

In 1970, all of SR 333 north of Griffin was also decommissioned.[47][43] In 1974, a freeway was built in Albany, with SR 333 designated on it.[15][34] Three years later, US 19 through the main part of Albany was shifted northeast to travel concurrently with the SR 333 freeway.[48][49] By March 1980, US 82 in Albany was also shifted onto the freeway.[35][36] Later that year, the northern terminus of SR 333 was truncated to the US 19/US 19 Bus./US 82/US 82 Bus./SR 50/SR 50 Bus./SR 62/SR 333 interchange in Albany, with SR 50 shifted onto the freeway.[36][38] In 1982, all of SR 333 that remained was redesignated as SR 300.[39][95]

State Route 333 Spur[edit]

State Route 333 Spur
Location: Albany
Existed: 1976–1980

State Route 333 Spur (SR 333 Spur) was a proposed spur route of SR 333 that was planned to be put inside the city limits of Albany. In 1976, it was indicated to be "projected mileage" from the SR 333 freeway just north of the Clark Avenue interchange and northeast to Turner Field Road.[97][48] In 1980, it was deleted, never having been built.[35][36]

State Route 336[edit]

State Route 336
Location: Stephens County
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1982[39][95]

State Route 336 (SR 336) was a state highway that existed in the northeastern part of the state. Between June 1960 and June 1963, it was established from SR 328 east of Avalon to SR 17 in the southeastern part of Toccoa. The entire highway was paved.[16][20] In 1982, the highway was decommissioned.[39][95]

State Route 340[edit]

State Route 340
Location: AustellFair Oaks
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1983[95][1]

State Route 340 (SR 340) was a state highway that existed in the Atlanta metropolitan area. It traversed the northeastern part of Douglas County and the south-central part of Cobb County. The roadway that would eventually become SR 340 was established in 1952 as an unnumbered road from US 78/SR 8 in Austell to SR 3 in Fair Oaks.[32][33] Between June 1960 and June 1963, this road was designated as SR 340. The entire length of the highway was paved.[16][20] In 1983, SR 5 was re-routed on a more southerly track, replacing all of SR 340.[95][1]

State Route 342[edit]

State Route 342
Location: Dawson County
Length: 5.240 mi[40] (8.433 km)
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1982[39][95]

State Route 342 (SR 342) was a 5.240-mile-long (8.433 km) state highway that existed in the north-central part of the state. It was completely within Dawson County. Between June 1960 and June 1963, it was established from SR 183 southeast of Juno to SR 52 southeast of Amicalola, on the southern edge of the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest. The entire highway was paved.[16][20] In 1982, it was decommissioned.[39][95]

State Route 343[edit]

State Route 343
Location: Tallulah FallsWiley
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1965[20][37]

State Route 343 (SR 343) was a short-lived state highway that existed in the northeastern part of the state. It was completely within Rabun County. Between June 1960 and June 1963, it was established on a concurrency with US 23, US 441, and possibly SR 15 from Tallulah Falls and Wiley. The entire path of this concurrency was paved.[16][20] By the end of 1965, it was decommissioned, with US 23/US 441/SR 15 all traveling on SR 343's former path.[20][37]

State Route 344[edit]

State Route 344
Location: RomeCartersville
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1977[48][49]

State Route 344 (SR 344) was a state highway that existed in the northwestern part of the state. It traversed portions of Floyd and Bartow counties.

The highway that would eventually become SR 344 was established at least as early as 1919 as part of SR 4 from Rome to Cartersville.[8] By the end of 1926, a portion of the highway from just east of Rome to a point northwest of Cartersville was under construction. In the northwestern part of Cartersville and farther to the west, a portion of the highway had a "completed semi hard surface".[9][10] Within three years, the segment of SR 4 was redesignated as part of SR 20, with US 41W designated on it. The portion of the highway just east of Rome had a "completed hard surface". The highway was under construction northwest of Cartersville.[10][11]

By the middle of 1930, the entire Rome–Cartersville segment had a completed hard surface.[11][50] Before the end of 1934, US 41W between Rome and Cartersville was redesignated as part of US 411.[59][67] In 1953, a small portion of SR 20 in the northern part of Cartersville was hard surfaced.[33][25] A few years later, all portions of SR 20 that had been built were paved.[4][5] Between 1960 and 1963, US 411 between Rome and Cartersville was shifted on a more southerly routing, concurrent with SR 344, which was commissioned at this time; SR 20 remained on the old alignment.[16][20] In 1977, SR 344 was decommissioned, and SR 20 was shifted onto US 411 between Rome and Cartersville. SR 20's old alignment was redesignated as part of SR 293.[48][49]

State Route 345[edit]

State Route 345
Location:
Existed: 1962–????

State Route 346[edit]

State Route 346
Location: Jackson County
Length: 5.36 mi[94] (8.63 km)
Existed: 1963[16][20]–2004[102][103]

State Route 346 (SR 346) was a short east–west state highway that existed in the north-central part of the state. It was completely within Jackson County. Between June 1960 and June 1963, it was established from US 129/SR 11 in Talmo to SR 82 Spur northeast of the city. the entire highway was paved.[16][20] In 1966, SR 82 Spur and SR 82 swapped paths in the area.[37][65] In 2004, SR 346 was decommissioned.[102][103]

State Route 349[edit]

State Route 349
Location: FlintstoneRossville
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1986[2][18]

State Route 349 (SR 349) was an east–west state highway that existed in the northwestern part of the state. It traveled entirely within the northern part of Walker County. Between June 1960 and June 1963, it was established from SR 193 in Flintstone to US 27/SR 1 in Rossville.[16][20] In 1986, it was decommissioned.[2][18]

State Route 350[edit]

State Route 350
Location: Athens
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1966[37][65]

State Route 350 (SR 350) was a state highway that existed in the Athens – Clarke County metropolitan area. It was entirely in Clarke County and the city limits of Athens. Between June 1960 and June 1963, it was established from US 129/SR 15 in the northwestern part of the city to US 29/SR 8 in the northeastern part. The entire divided highway was paved.[16][20] By the end of 1965, US 29 was designated on SR 350 from the US 129/SR 15 interchange, which also has US 29 Temp. and US 441 Temp., to the US 29/SR 8 interchange. US 441 Temp. was designated on it from the US 129/SR 15 interchange to the US 441/SR 15 Alt. interchange. A western extension of SR 350, ending at US 29/US 78/SR 8/SR 10, was under construction. Also, SR 350 was under construction east-southeast just slightly from the US 29/SR 8 interchange.[20][37] In 1966, SR 350 was decommissioned. US 29 was designated on the freeway from the western terminus to where it, as well as SR 8, depart the freeway. This interchange also had SR 8 Bus. and SR 106. SR 8 was designated on the entire length of the freeway. Its former path through the city was redesignated as SR 8 Bus., still concurrent with US 78/SR 10.[37][65]

State Route 351[edit]

State Route 351
Location: Clayton and Henry counties
Length: 13 mi[104] (21 km)
Existed: 1963[16][20]–1985[1][2]

State Route 351 (SR 351) was a 13-mile-long (21 km) state highway that existed in the Atlanta metropolitan area. It traversed portions of Clayton and Henry counties. Between September 1953 and June 1954, the roadway that would eventually become SR 351 was established as an unnumbered road from SR 138 in Jonesboro to US 23/SR 42 east-northeast of Flippen.[25][3] Between June 1960 and June 1963 SR 351 was designated on this road.[16][20] In 1985, it was decommissioned.[1][2]

State Route 353[edit]

State Route 353
Location: Coffee, Irwin, and Ben Hill counties
Existed: 1965[20][37]–1988[19][21]

State Route 353 (SR 353) was a north–south state highway that was located in the south-central part of the state. It traversed the northwest portion of Coffee County, the extreme northeastern part of Irwin County, and the southeastern part of Ben Hill County. Between June 1960 and June 1963, the roadway that would eventually become SR 353 was established as an unnumbered road built from SR 158 west of Douglas, then north and northwest to SR 268 west-southwest of Broxton.[16][20] By the end of 1965, SR 353 was designated on this road and extended northwest to the Coffee–Irwin county line.[20][37] In 1966, SR 353 was proposed to be extended northwest to SR 206 north-northeast of Wray in the southeastern part of Ben Hill County.[37][65] In 1973, the highway was extended on this planned path.[14][15] In 1980, it was extended south-southeast around the southwestern part of Douglas to SR 135.[35][36] In 1988, SR 206 was shifted southeast, replacing all of SR 353.[19][21]

State Route 357[edit]

State Route 357
Location: Columbus
Length: 15.5 mi[citation needed] (24.9 km)
Existed: 1965[20][37]–1983[95][1]

State Route 357 (SR 357) was a 15.5 miles (24.9 km) north–south state highway that was located in the west-central part of the state. It was completely within Muscogee County and the city limits of Columbus. In April 1932, the roadway that would eventually become SR 357 was built as an unnumbered road from the main part of Columbus east to the western edge of Fort Benning.[105][56] Later that year, SR 103 was designated on this road, with a "completed hard surface".[56][57] In 1952, an unnumbered road was built from SR 103 in the eastern part of Columbus north-northwest to US 27 Alt./SR 85.[32][33] Between June 1963 and the end of 1965, SR 103's southern terminus was truncated to Buena Vista Road and Brennan Road in the main part of Columbus. Its former path on Buena Vista Road was redesignated as SR 357. The unnumbered road built a decade before was also numbered as part of SR 357.[20][37] In 1969, SR 357 was extended south-southwest to SR 85 south of Columbus (now within Fort Benning). This extension replaced SR 1 Spur.[46][47] In 1983, SR 357 was decommissioned.[95][1]

State Route 359[edit]

State Route 359
Location: Chatham County
Existed: 1965[20][37]–1968[66][46]

State Route 359 (SR 359) was a short lived state highway that existed completely within Chatham County, mostly within the city limits of Savannah. Between June 1963 and the end of 1965, it was established from just north of Hunter Air Force Base south of the city to US 17/US 80/SR 25/SR 26S in downtown, traveling on Abercorn Street and 37th Street.[20][37] In 1968, the entire highway was redesignated as part of SR 204.[66][46]

State Route 361[edit]

State Route 361
Location: Bibb County
Length: 21 mi[citation needed] (34 km)
Existed: 1967[65][66]–1982[39][95]

State Route 361 (SR 361) was a north–south state highway that was located in the central part of the state. It was completely within Bibb County, mostly in the city limits of Macon. Between June 1963 and the end of 1966, the roadway that would eventually become SR 361 was built as Hartley Bridge Road and Mt. Pleasant Church Road south of Macon.[20][37] In 1967, SR 361 was established from US 41/SR 49/SR 247 south of Macon, west on Hartley Bridge Road and Mt. Pleasant Church Road, then north-northeast on Fulton Mill Road, Heath Road, Tucker Road, and Foster Road, and then northeast on Bass Road to SR 87 east-southeast of Bolingbroke.[65][66] In 1972, US 23 was shifted onto SR 87.[43][44] In 1976, US 129 onto US 41/SR 49/SR 247 south of Macon.[97][48] In 1982, SR 361 was decommissioned.[39][95]

State Route 363[edit]

State Route 363
Location: SaffoldBlakely
Length: 19 mi[citation needed] (31 km)
Existed: 1967[65][66]–1985[1][2]

State Route 363 (SR 363) was a north–south state highway that was located in the southwestern part of the state. It was completely within Early County. The roadway that would eventually become SR 363 was built in 1952 as an unnumbered road from US 84/SR 38 in Saffold to SR 39 in the southern part of Blakely.[32][33] The next year, the northern terminus of this road was shifted to SR 62 in the western part of Blakely.[33][25] In 1966, the northern terminus was shifted back to its original location.[37][65] In 1967, SR 363 was designated on this road.[65][66] In 1985, all of SR 363 except for the southern piece was decommissioned. This southern portion was redesignated as part of SR 370.[1][2]

State Route 363 Spur[edit]

State Route 363 Spur
Location: Early County
Existed: 1967[65][66]–1985[1][2]

State Route 363 Spur (SR 363 Spur) was a spur route of SR 363 that existed entirely in the southwestern part of Early County. Between June 1963 and the end of 1966, an unnumbered road was built west-southwest from Cedar Springs.[20][37] In 1967, SR 363 Spur was designated on this road.[65][66] In 1985, when SR 363 and SR 363 Spur were decommissioned, SR 273 was extended west-southwest of Cedar Springs. This replaced the eastern part of SR 363 Spur. What was the western part was redesignated as SR 273 Spur.[1][2]

State Route 364[edit]

State Route 364
Location: Thomas and Brooks counties
Existed: 1966[37][65]–1982[39][95]

State Route 364 (SR 364) was an east–west state highway that was located in the southern part of the state. It traversed portions of Thomas and Brooks counties. In 1966, it was established from US 84/SR 38 west of Boston to US 84/SR 38 west of Quitman. Its entire length was hard surfaced.[37][65] In 1982, it was decommissioned.[39][95]

State Route 366[edit]

State Route 366
Location: Hart County
Length: 10 mi[citation needed] (16 km)
Existed: 1967[65][66]–1990[91][101]

State Route 366 (SR 366) was a north–south state highway that was located in the northeastern part of the state. It was completely within Hart County. In 1967, it was established from an intersection with SR 51 and SR 77 west of Hartwell, then northwest on a concurrency with SR 77 and solely north-northwest to Interstate 85 (I-85) northeast of Lavonia and just south of Tugaloo State Park. The entire highway was hard surfaced.[65][66] In 1990, SR 77's path in the Lavonia area was shifted northeast, replacing all of SR 366. Its former path was redesignated as SR 77 Conn.[91][101]

State Route 367[edit]

State Route 367
Location: Whitemarsh IslandWilmington Island
Existed: 1969[46][47]–1985[1][2]

State Route 367 (SR 367) was an east–west state highway that was located in the east-central part of the state. It was completely within Chatham County in the Savannah metropolitan area. Between June 1963 and the end of 1965, SR 26 Loop was established from US 80/SR 26 in Whitemarsh Island, then southeast over Turner Creek, then northeast and north-northeast to US 80/SR 26 in Wilmington Island. Its entire length was hard surfaced.[20][37] In 1969, it was redesignated as SR 367.[46][47] In 1985, it was decommissioned.[1][2]

State Route 373[edit]

State Route 373
Location: Gordon County
Existed: 1972[44][14]–1977[48][49]

State Route 373 (SR 373) was an east–west state highway that was located in the northwestern part of the state. It was completely within Gordon County. Between June 1963 and the end of 1965, the roadways that would eventually become SR 373 were built as unnumbered roads. One extended from Calhoun to Cash. The other extended from Cash to SR 53 in Sonoraville.[20][37] In 1972, SR 373 was designated on both of these roads, starting at SR 156 in Calhoun.[44][14] In 1977, it was decommissioned.[48][49]

State Route 375[edit]

State Route 375
Location: Quitman and Stewart counties
Existed: 1972[44][106]–1972[44][14]

State Route 375 (SR 375) was a very short-lived state highway that existed in the west-central part of the state. It traversed portions of Quitman and Stewart counties. Between June 1963 and the end of 1965, the roadway that would eventually become SR 375 was built as an unnumbered road from Florence north-northeast to Omaha, and then eastward to US 27/SR 1 south-southeast of Louvale.[20][37] In 1968, this road was extended south-southwest to SR 27 in Georgetown.[66][46] In early 1972, this road was designated as SR 375.[44][106] Later that year, it was redesignated as a northern extension of SR 39.[44][14]

State Route 375 Connector[edit]

State Route 375 Connector
Location: FlorenceLumpkin
Existed: 1970–1972

State Route 375 Connector (SR 375 Conn.) was a connector route of SR 375 that existed entirely in Stewart County in the west-central part of the state. In 1970, the roadway that would eventually become SR 375 Conn. was built as an unnumbered road from Florence to US 27/SR 1 in Lumpkin.[47][43] In early 1972, this road was designated as SR 375 Conn.[44][106] Later that year, it was redesignated as SR 39 Conn.[44][14]

State Route 379[edit]

State Route 379
Location: Pickens County
Existed: 1977[48][49]–1981[38][39]

State Route 379 (SR 379) was a short-lived east–west state highway that was located in the north-central part of the state. It was completely within Pickens County. The roadway that would eventually become SR 379 was established in 1941 as an eastern segment of SR 143 from SR 53 east of Fairmount to SR 5 and SR 53 in Tate.[41][30] By the end of 1946, the eastern half of this segment had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface. The western half of it was indicated to be "projected mileage".[7][17]

By the end of 1960, nearly the entire part of this highway west of the SR 156 intersection was decommissioned.[5][16] By the end of 1963, this decommissioned part was re-instated.[16][20] In 1970, a portion of it southeast of the SR 53 intersection was hard surfaced.[47][43] In 1973, this portion was indicated to be "under construction or projected mileage".[14][15] In 1977, all of SR 143 from its western terminus to northeast of Sharp Top was redesignated as SR 379; northeast of this point to west of Tate was redesignated as part of SR 108; and from there to Tate was redesignated as SR 108 Conn.[48][49] In 1981, SR 379 was decommissioned.[38][39]

State Route 381[edit]

State Route 381
Location: DallasCross Roads
Existed: 1979[35][36]–1990[91][101]

State Route 381 (SR 381) was a north-south state highway located in Paulding County in the northwestern part of the state. The roadway that would eventually become SR 381 was built in 1939, when SR 92 was extended from Hiram to Acworth.[73][73] By the end of 1948, the entire length of SR 92 that would become SR 381 was hard surfaced.[7][17] In 1966, the DallasNew Hope segment of SR 92 was shifted to the southeast. Its old alignment became SR 92 Spur.[37][65] In 1972, the Hiram–New Hope segment of SR 92 was shifted east. Its old alignment between New Hope and Cross Roads became a northeast extension of SR 92 Spur.[44][14] In 1979, SR 92 Spur was redesignated as SR 381.[35][36] In 1990, SR 381 was decommissioned.[91][101]

On April 4, 1977, Southern Airways Flight 242 attempted a landing on this stretch of highway near New Hope. The DC-9 crashed, killing the flight crew, 60 passengers, and eight people on the ground. It also destroyed a gas station, grocery store, and other structures.[107]

State Route 387[edit]

State Route 387
Location: East PointCollege Park
Length: 2.9 mi[109] (4.7 km)
Existed: 1990[91][101]–1991[101][108]

State Route 387 (SR 387) was a very short-lived state highway that existed in the Atlanta metropolitan area. It traversed portions of Fulton and Clayton counties. In 1990, it was established on Camp Creek Parkway from Interstate 285 (I-285) in East Point to I-85 in College Park.[91][101] The next year, it was decommissioned.[101][108]


County Location mi[109] km Destinations Notes
Fulton East Point 0.0 0.0 I‑285 Western terminus; I-285 exit 3
Clayton
No major junctions
Fulton College Park 2.8 4.5 US 29 / SR 14 / SR 139 (Main Street)
FultonClayton
county line
2.9 4.7 I‑85 – Columbus Eastern terminus; I-85 exit 18A
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 407 Loop[edit]

State Route 407 Loop
Location: Sandy Springs
Existed: 1990[91]–1994[83]

State Route 407 Loop (SR 407 Loop) was a state route that was an related route State Route 407, a unsigned designation along I-285 (similar to Georgia State Route 404 Spur). It traveled off I-285 (now Glenridge Drive), and then turned left onto Dunwoody Peachtree Road by Saint Joseph's Hospital of Atlanta to I-285 (SR 407) once again. The route was officially removed in 1994.

State Route 701[edit]

State Route 701
Location: Troup County
Existed: 1973[14][15]–1975[34][97]

State Route 701 (SR 701) was a short-lived state highway that existed in the west-central part of the state. It was entirely in Troup County. In 1970, it was indicated to be "projected mileage" from a point west of LaGrange to SR 109 south-southeast of Glenn.[47][43] In 1973, the entire length of the highway was hard surfaced.[14][15] In 1975, SR 109 was shifted southwestward, replacing all of SR 701.[34][97]

State Route 701 Spur[edit]

State Route 701 Spur
Location: Troup County
Existed: 1973[14][15]–1975[34][97]

State Route 701 Spur (SR 701 Spur) was a short-lived spur route of SR 701 that existed in the west-central part of the state. It was entirely in Troup County. In 1970, it was indicated to be "projected mileage" from the Alabama state line west of Abbottsford to SR 701 in that community.[47][43] In 1973, the entire length of the highway was hard surfaced.[14][15] In 1975, it was redesignated as SR 109 Spur.[34][97]

State Route 704[edit]

State Route 704
Location: Chatham County

State Route 704 (SR 704) was a proposed state highway that was planned for the northern part of Chatham County. In 1973, it was proposed from SR 30 west-northwest of Monteith to SR 21 north-northwest of that community.[14][15] Between January 1979 and March 1980, the path of SR 30 in the Monteith area was shifted northward, replacing the proposed path of SR 704.[35][36]

State Route 705[edit]

State Route 705
Location: Marietta
Existed: 1972[110][111]–1976[97][48]

State Route 705 (SR 705) was a state highway that existed in the north-central part of Cobb County. It was proposed between 1961 and 1966 from SR 5 southwest of Marietta to SR 5 in southern Cherokee County.[112][110] By 1973, the interchange with I-75 and a short piece of SR 705 northeast of it were built.[110][111] In 1976, SR 705 between I-75 and the northern intersection with SR 5 was built and redesignated as SR 5 Conn.[97][48] In 1984, SR 5 Conn. was redesignated as SR 5 Spur. SR 5's path north of Marietta was shifted westward, onto Interstate 75 (I-75) and I-575, replacing all of the proposed portion of SR 705.[113][114]

The entire route was in Marietta, Cobb County.

mi km Destinations Notes
I‑75 (SR 401) Southern terminus; I-75 exit 114
Owenby Drive Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 706[edit]

State Route 706
Location: East of Ashton-Broxton
Existed: ????–????

State Route 707[edit]

State Route 707
Location: Midway

State Route 707 (SR 707) was a proposed state highway that was planned for the southeastern part of Midway. In 1974, it was proposed from US 17/SR 25 and SR 38 at the eastern terminus of US 82 to SR 38 east-southeast of Midway.[15][34] Between January 1979 and March 1980, the path of SR 38 east of Midway was shifted southward, replacing the proposed path of SR 707. US 82 was extended along this path.[35][36]

State Route 713[edit]

State Route 713
Location: Cobb, Cherokee, and Pickens counties
Existed: 1977[48][49]–1985[1][2]

State Route 713 (SR 713) was a state highway. In 1977, I-575/SR 713 was proposed from I-75 north of Marietta to just south of the CherokeePickens county line. It was completed from SR 140 south of Canton to SR 20 east of the city.[48][49] The next year, the entire Cobb County portion (except for the southern end) of I-575/SR 713 was under construction.[49][35] By March 1980, I-575/SR 713 was completed to SR 92 southwest of Woodstock and one exit to the south in the Canton area. SR 713 was proposed to be extended northwest to SR 5 in Talking Rock. SR 713 Spur was proposed from SR 5 to SR 713 at the northern terminus of I-575.[35][36] Later that year, the southern completed part of I-575/SR 713 was extended south to I-75.[36][38] The next year, SR 5's path from south of Nelson to southeast of Talking Rock was shifted westward, replacing the northern extension of SR 713.[38][39] In 1982, I-575/SR 713 was under construction from SR 92 southwest of Woodstock to south of Canton and from east of Canton to I-575's northern terminus north-northwest of Ball Ground. SR 713 was proposed to be extended northwest to SR 5 west-northwest of Talking Rock and north to the southern terminus of SR 719 at SR 5.[39][95] The next year, I-575/SR 713 was completed from SR 92 southwest of Woodstock to south of Canton.[95][1] In 1985, I-575 was completed northeast to a point southwest of Ball Ground. SR 5's path from Talking Rock to south-southwest of Ellijay was shifted westward, replacing all of SR 713.[1][2]

State Route 713 Spur[edit]

State Route 713 Spur
Location: Cherokee and Pickens counties

State Route 713 Spur (SR 713 Spur) was a proposed spur route of SR 713. Between the beginning of 1979 and March 1980, it was proposed from SR 5 to SR 713 at the northern terminus of Interstate 575 (I-575).[35][36] In 1981, SR 5's path from south of Nelson to southeast of Talking Rock was shifted westward, replacing SR 713 Spur.[38][39]

State Route 719[edit]

State Route 719
Location: Gilmer County

State Route 719 (SR 719) was a proposed state highway. Between the beginning of 1979 and March 1980, it was proposed from SR 5 south-southwest of Ellijay to US 76/SR 5 northeast of that city.[35][36] In 1981, SR 719 was under construction.[38][39] In 1983, SR 5 in Gilmer County was shifted eastward, replacing the proposed path of SR 719.[95][1]

State Route 721[edit]

State Route 721
Location: Spalding and Butts counties
Existed: 1979[115][116]–1983[95][1]

State Route 721 (SR 721) was a short-lived state highway that existed in portions of Spalding and Butts counties. At least as early as 1919, SR 7 was established on essentially the same path as SR 721 would eventually travel.[8] Between the end of September 1921 and October 1926, US 41 was designated on this path.[9][10] Between the beginning of 1959 and the beginning of 1964, US 41 and SR 7 were shifted onto the new western bypass of the city, and off of this path.[117][118] Between the beginning of 1974 and the beginning of 1980, SR 721 was designated on two segments: the former path of US 41/SR 7 in Griffin and from High Falls Road east of the city to SR 16 west-southwest of Jackson. This last intersection was just to the east of the Spalding–Butts county line. It was proposed between the two segments.[115][116] In 1983, the path of SR 16 east of Griffin was shifted southward, replacing SR 721.[95][1]


County Location mi km Destinations Notes
Spalding Griffin US 19 Bus. / US 41 Bus. / SR 3 / SR 16 Western terminus
Memorial Drive south
Gap in route
High Falls Road
Butts SR 16 Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 726[edit]

State Route 726
Location: Powder Springs
Existed: 1990[91][101]–1991[101][108]

State Route 726 (SR 726) was a state highway In 1983, it was proposed as a western bypass of Powder Springs, Clarkdale, and Austell, from an unnumbered road south-southwest of Powder Springs to US 78/SR 5/SR 8 southwest of Austell.[95][1] In 1986, US 278/SR 6 in the Powder Springs–Austell area was shifted westward, onto the path of SR 726 and the northern part of the unnumbered road in Powder Springs. The former path from Powder Springs to Austell was redesignated as SR 6 Bus.[2][18] In 1988, a proposed northern rerouting of US 278/SR 6 was designated as a second iteration of SR 726.[19][21] In 1990, SR 726 was completed.[91][101] The next year, the path of US 278/SR 6 in the Powder Springs area was shifted northward, onto the former path of SR 726.[101][108]

This table shows the completed section of SR 726. The entire route was in Cobb County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
US 278 / SR 6 Western terminus
Powder Springs US 278 / SR 6 / SR 6 Bus. east Eastern terminus of SR 726; western terminus of SR 6 Bus.
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 728[edit]

State Route 728
Location: McRae

State Route 728 (SR 728) was a proposed state highway that was planned for the eastern part of the McRae area. In 1994, it was proposed as an eastern bypass of McRae, from US 280/SR 30 south-southwest of the city, around to US 319/US 441/SR 31, just north of where they split from US 280/SR 30 northeast of Helena.[83][84] As of the 2013 Telfair County map, the bypass was still proposed.[119][120]

State Route 730[edit]

State Route 730
Location: LaFayette

State Route 730 (SR 730) was a proposed state highway. In 1982, it was proposed as an eastern bypass of LaFayette, from southeast of the city to north-northeast of it.[39][95] In 1988, US 27/SR 1 in the area was shifted eastward, onto the path of SR 730. Its former path through the city was redesignated as US 27 Bus./SR 1 Bus.[19][21]

State Route 732[edit]

State Route 732
Location: Athens

State Route 732 (SR 732) was a proposed state highway that was planned for the southwestern part of the Athens metropolitan area, almost entirely in Oconee County. In 1983, the southwestern part of the Athens Perimeter Highway, designated as SR 732, was proposed to be the final connecting piece of the freeway.[95][1] In 1987, the Athens Perimeter Highway was completed, with SR 10 on the southern part.[18][19]

State Route 733[edit]

State Route 733
Location: Gilmer County

State Route 733 (SR 733) was a proposed state highway in the northeastern part of Gilmer County. Between 1977 and 1980, it was proposed between two intersections with US 76/SR 5 northeast of Ellijay.[121][122] Between 1984 and 1991, US 76/SR 5/SR 515 was shifted onto the path of SR 733, replacing it.[123][124]

State Route 734[edit]

State Route 734
Location: Gilmer County

State Route 734 (SR 734) was a proposed state highway in the northeastern part of Gilmer County. Between 1977 and 1980, SR 734 was proposed from US 76/SR 5 south-southwest of Cherry Log, across US 76/SR 5 north-northeast of Cherry Log, and then to another intersection with US 76/SR 5 in Lucius.[121][122] Between 1984 and 1991, US 76/SR 5/SR 515 was shifted onto the path of SR 734, replacing it.[123][124]

State Route 736[edit]

State Route 736
Location: Augusta

State Route 736 (SR 736) was a short proposed state highway that was planned in Augusta. In 1982, it was proposed to connect the eastern terminus of the John C. Calhoun Expressway (which would later carry SR 28), at 15th Street, with the western terminus of Greene Street, at SR 4 (13th Street).[39][95] In 1985, SR 28 was shifted southwest, off of Broad Street northwest of 5th Street, and onto John C. Calhoun Expressway, the proposed path of SR 736, and Greene Street.[1][2]

State Route 741[edit]

State Route 741
Location: Crawfordville

State Route 741 (SR 741) was a proposed state highway that was planned in Crawfordville. In 1983, it was proposed as a western bypass of Crawfordville, from SR 22 southwest of the city to SR 22 northwest of it.[95][1] In 1985, the path of SR 22 in Crawfordville was shifted westward, replacing the proposed path of SR 741.[1][2]

State Route 744[edit]

State Route 744
Location: Polk County

State Route 744 (SR 744) was a proposed state highway in the western part of Polk County. In 1987, it was proposed as an eastern bypass of Cedartown, from US 27/SR 1/SR 100 south-southwest of the city to US 27/SR 1 north-northeast of it.[18][19] In 1991, the path of US 27/SR 1 through the area was shifted eastward, replacing the path of SR 744.[101][108]

State Route 744 Spur[edit]

State Route 744 Spur
Location: Cedartown

State Route 744 Spur (SR 744 Spur) was a proposed spur route of SR 744 that partially existed in the city limits of Cedartown. In 1987, it was proposed from US 27/SR 1/SR 100 in the city to the proposed path of SR 744 southeast of it.[18][19] In 1991, US 278/SR 6 was shifted southward, out of the main part of the city, replacing the spur route.[101][108]

State Route 746[edit]

State Route 746
Location: Floyd County
Existed: 1990[91][101]–1992[108][82]

State Route 746 (SR 746) was a state highway that existed in the east-central part of Floyd County, just to the east of Rome. In 1985, it was proposed from US 411/SR 20 southeast of Rome north-northeast and northwest to SR 53 at the eastern terminus of SR 53 Spur.[1][2] In 1990, the portion of SR 746 between US 411/SR 20 and SR 293 was built.[91][101] Two years later, all of the original completed and proposed portions of SR 746 from US 411/SR 20 to SR 53 and the entire length of SR 53 Spur were redesignated as parts of SR 1 Loop. At this time, a separate segment of SR 746 was proposed from SR 20 west-northwest of Rome south-southeast and southeast to US 27/US 411/SR 1/SR 53 just north-northeast of Six Mile, east-northeast to SR 101 south-southeast of Rome, and east-northeast and north-northeast to US 411/SR 20 at SR 1 Loop.[108][82] Nearly a decade later, the proposed western terminus was shifted westward on SR 20 to begin at a point east-northeast of Coosa.[125][126] In 2005, the entire length of SR 746 was cancelled.[103][127]

This table shows the completed portion of SR 746. The entire route was in Floyd County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
US 411 / SR 20 Southern terminus
SR 293 Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 747[edit]

State Route 747
Location: Newnan
Existed: 1988[19][128]–1989[21][91]

State Route 747 (SR 747) was a short-lived state highway that existed just north of Newnan. In 1984, a northern bypass of Newnan was established from US 29/SR 14 just north of the city to SR 34 just northeast of it. However, it was unnumbered.[1][129] The next year, a western extension of this bypass, designated as SR 747, was proposed to have a western terminus at SR 34 west of the city.[1][2] In 1986, this bypass was then proposed as SR 34 Byp.[2][18] The next year, it was re-proposed as SR 747.[18][19] In 1988, it was completed as SR 747 from US 27 Alt./SR 16 to US 29/SR 14.[19][128] The next year, this bypass was entirely redesignated as SR 34 Byp.[21][91]

The entire route was in Coweta County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
US 27 Alt. / SR 16 Western terminus
US 29 / SR 14 Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 748[edit]

State Route 748
Location: Polk County

State Route 748 (SR 748) was a proposed state highway In 1987, it was proposed as part of an eastern bypass of Rockmart, from SR 113 east-northeast of the city south and south-southeast to US 278/SR 6 east-southeast of Van Wert.[18][19] In 1990, US 278/SR 6 was shifted northeast from Van Wert on SR 113 and southeast on the proposed path of SR 748, with SR 101/SR 113 concurrent with them to Yorkville.[91][101]

State Route 754[edit]

State Route 754
Location: Cobb and Cherokeee counties
Existed: 1985[1][2]–2003[130][102]

State Route 754 (SR 754) was a state highway that existed in Cobb and Cherokee counties. The roadway that would eventually become SR 754 was established at least as early as 1919 as part of SR 5.[8] SR 5's path between Marietta and northeast of Canton was shifted onto Interstate 575 (I-575), replacing SR 713 on that path. The portion between Marietta and west-northwest of Lebanon was redesignated as SR 754.[1][2] In 1986, the southern terminus was truncated to just north of Piedmont Road north of Marietta.[2][18] The next year, the southern terminus was re-extended to the northern terminus of SR 5 Spur.[18][19] In 1991, the northern terminus was truncated to SR 92 southwest of Woodstock.[101][108] In 1995, the southern terminus was truncated to just south of the Cobb–Cherokee county line.[84][85] In 1997, the southern terminus was truncated to the county line itself.[98][99] In 2003, the highway was decommissioned.[130][102]


County Location mi km Destinations Notes
Cobb SR 5 Spur south Southern terminus of SR 754; northern terminus of SR 5 Spur; roadway continues as Canton Road, a former segment of SR 5.
Cherokee SR 92
Lebanon Main Street Former segment of SR 5
I‑575 / SR 5 Northern terminus; I-575/SR 5 exit 6
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 758[edit]

State Route 758
Location: Macon

State Route 758 (SR 758) was a proposed state highway that was planned in the southeastern part of Macon. In 1985, it was proposed as a southeastern rerouting of US 80, from the intersection of US 80/SR 22 (Eisenhower Parkway) and US 41 Bus./US 129/SR 11/SR 49 east-northeast and north-northeast to US 23/US 80/US 129 Alt./SR 19/SR 87 (Emery Highway).[1][2] In 1998, the entire length of SR 758 (except for the westernmost portion) was canceled. The western part was built as an eastern extension of Eisenhower Parkway, but as an unnumbered road.[99][131]

State Route 759[edit]

State Route 759
Location: Commerce
Existed: 1991[101][108]–1992[108][82]

State Route 759 (SR 759) was a very short-lived state highway that existed entirely within the northern part of Jackson County, to the east of Commerce. In 1989, it was proposed as an eastern bypass of the main part of Commerce, from US 441/SR 15 south-southeast of Commerce to another intersection north-northeast of the city.[21][91] In 1991, SR 759 around Commerce was completed.[101][108] The next year, the path of US 441/SR 15 in the Commerce area was shifted eastward, replacing SR 759. The former path of US 441, on SR 334 and SR 98, was redesignated as US 441 Bus.[108][82]

The entire route was in Jackson County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
US 441 / SR 15 Southern terminus
SR 334
SR 98
SR 326
SR 59
US 441 / SR 15 Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 765[edit]

State Route 765
Location: Homer

State Route 765 (SR 765) was a proposed state highway that existed in the Homer area. In 1991, it was proposed as an eastern bypass of Homer, from US 441/SR 15/SR 164 south-southeast of Homer to US 441/SR 15 north-northeast of the city.[101][108] In 2004, the path of US 441/SR 15 in the Homer area was shifted eastward, onto the proposed path of SR 765.[102][103]

State Route 768[edit]

State Route 768
Location: Paulding County

State Route 768 (SR 768) was a proposed state highway in Paulding County. In 1987, it was proposed as a southern bypass of Dallas, from west-southwest of the city to US 278/SR 6/SR 120 southeast of it; this replaced the proposed path of SR 6 Byp.[18][19] In 1990, US 278/SR 6/SR 120 was routed on the proposed path of SR 768.[91][101]

State Route 768 Spur[edit]

State Route 768 Spur
Location: Paulding County

State Route 768 Spur (SR 768 Spur) was a proposed spur route of SR 768 that was planned to be placed in the east-central part of Paulding, north-northwest of the city limits of Hiram. Between the beginning of 1982 and the beginning of 1987, it was planned to be designated between the proposed path of SR 768 and US 278/SR 6/SR 120, at the point where they met the western terminus of SR 360.[132][133] In 1990, US 278/SR 6/SR 120 was shifted southward, onto the proposed path of SR 768, with SR 120/SR 360 shifted onto the proposed path of SR 768 Spur.[91][101]

State Route 771[edit]

State Route 771
Location: Fannin County
Existed: 1995[134][135]–2001[125][126]

State Route 771 (SR 771) was a short-lived state highway that existed in the north-central part of Fannin County. In 1986, it was proposed from SR 5 south of McCaysville to the Tennessee state line north-northwest of the city.[2][2] By 1996, it was established on this proposed path.[134][135] In 2001, it was decommissioned.[125][126]

The entire route was in Fannin County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
Chattahoochee National Forest SR 5 Southern terminus
Tennessee state line Tennessee state line Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 773[edit]

State Route 773
Location: Tallulah Falls

State Route 773 (SR 773) was a proposed state highway that was proposed partially for the town of Tallulah Falls. In 1986, it was proposed as a western cut-off, on a more direct path between two intersections with US 23/US 441/SR 15 from south of Tallulah Falls and into the city.[2][18] The next year, the path of US 23/US 441/SR 15 in the Tallulah Falls area was shifted westward, onto the proposed path of SR 773. The former path was redesignated as SR 15 Loop.[18][19]

State Route 789[edit]

State Route 789
Location: Polk and Paulding counties

State Route 789 (SR 789) was a proposed state highway in Polk and Paulding counties. In 1987, it was proposed as a northeastern bypass of Yorkville, from north-northeast of Yorkville to east of it.[18][19] In 1993, US 278/SR 6 was shifted northeast from Yorkville onto the former proposed path of SR 789[82][83]

State Route 793[edit]

State Route 793
Location: Bremen

State Route 793 (SR 793) was a proposed state highway in the north-central part of Carroll County and the southern part of Haralson County. In 1988, it was proposed as a western bypass of Bremen, from south-southwest of the city to north-northwest of it.[19][21] In 1993, US 27/SR 1 in the Bremen area was shifted westward, onto the path of SR 793. The former path was redesignated as US 27 Bus./SR 1 Bus.[82][83]

State Route 811[edit]

State Route 811
Location: Haralson County

State Route 811 (SR 811) was a proposed state highway in the central portion of Haralson County. In 1989, it was proposed from US 27/SR 1 south-southeast of Buchanan north-northwest across US 27/SR 1, and curved around the east side of the city to a point north-northwest of it.[21][91] In 1992, US 27/SR 1 was rerouted onto the proposed path of SR 811 and was shifted east of the city. The former path was redesignated as US 27 Bus./SR 1 Bus.[108][82]

State Route 813[edit]

State Route 813
Location: Walker County

State Route 813 (SR 813) was a proposed state highway in the northern part of Walker County. In 1994, it was proposed as a western bypass of the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, from US 27/SR 1 east-northeast of Chickamauga to SR 2 west-southwest of Fort Oglethorpe.[83][84] In 2001, US 27/SR 1's path through the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park was shifted westward, onto the path of SR 813.[125][126]

State Route 816[edit]

State Route 816
Location: Sandersville

State Route 816 (SR 816) was a proposed state highway that was proposed in the northern part of Sandersville, in the central part of Washington County. In 1988, it was proposed as a northern bypass of Sandersville, from Deepstep Road northwest of the city to SR 88 east-northeast of it.[19][21] The next year, the proposed path of SR 816 was extended southwest to SR 24 west of the city.[21][91] In 1991, the path of SR 88 was extended westward, replacing the proposed path of SR 816.[101][108]

State Route 817[edit]

State Route 817
Location: Gwinnett, Barrow, and Oconee counties

State Route 817 (SR 817) was a proposed state highway that was planned form Gwinnett, Barrow, and Oconee counties. In 1989, a southern bypass of the DaculaAthens area, designated as SR 817, was proposed from US 29/SR 8 (and what was then the eastern terminus of SR 316) west-southwest of Dacula to the southwest corner of the Athens Perimiter Highway.[21][91] In 1991, SR 817's path from west-southwest of Dacula to SR 11 north of Bethlehem was completed as an eastern extension of SR 316.[101][108] In 1993, SR 817's path from north of Bethlehem to US 78/SR 10 southeast of Bogart was also completed as an eastern extension of SR 316, with US 29 shifted onto its entire length, from what was the western terminus of the proposed path of SR 817. SR 8 was shifted onto US 29/SR 316 from southeast of Russell to southeast of Bogart.[82][83] In 1996, SR 817's path in the southwestern part of Athens was completed as an eastern extension of SR 316, with US 29/US 78/SR 8 concurrent with it.[85][98]

State Route 818[edit]

State Route 818
Location: Watkinsville

State Route 818 (SR 818) was a proposed state highway that was planned for the Watkinsville area. In 1990, a western bypass of the city, then proposed as a northern extension of SR 186, was planned from US 129/US 441/SR 24 north-northeast of Bishop to US 129/US 441/SR 15 in the southern part of Athens.[91][101] In 1992, this bypass was then proposed as SR 818.[108][82] In 1995, the path of US 129/US 441/SR 24, with SR 15 north of SR 24's northern terminus, was shifted westward, replacing the proposed path of SR 818. The former path of US 129/US 441/SR 24 was redesignated as US 129 Bus./US 441 Bus./SR 24 Bus.[84][85]

State Route 822[edit]

State Route 822
Location: Dublin
Existed: 1989[21][91]–1992[108][82]

State Route 822 (SR 822) was a state highway that existed entirely within the city limits of Dublin. In 1989, it was established from just south of the CSX railroad tracks in Dublin north-northwest to US 80/US 319/SR 26/SR 29/SR 31 (Bellevue Avenue).[21][91] In 1992, the path of SR 31 in Dublin was shifted east-southeastward, off of US 319/US 441/SR 19 and US 80/US 319/SR 26/SR 29, and onto the path of SR 822.[108][82]

The entire route was in Dublin, Laurens County.

mi km Destinations Notes
Downtown Dublin Southern terminus
US 80 / US 319 / SR 26 / SR 29 / SR 31 (Bellevue Avenue) Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 826[edit]

State Route 826
Location: Eatonton

State Route 826 (SR 826) was a proposed state highway that was planned in the western part of Eatonton, in the central part of Putnam County. In 1988, it was proposed as a western bypass of the city, from US 129/SR 44 in Warfield to US 129/US 441/SR 24 north of Eatonton.[19][21] In 1992, the path of US 129/US 441/SR 24 in this area was shifted westward, replacing the proposed path of SR 826.[108][82]

State Route 828[edit]

State Route 828
Location: Jenkins County

State Route 828 (SR 828) was a proposed state highway that was planned in the central part of Jenkins County. In 1989, it was proposed as a northeastern bypass of Millen, from SR 21 east of the city to US 25/SR 121 north-northwest of it.[21][91] In 1995, the path of SR 21 in the Millen area was shifted northward, replacing the path of SR 828.[84][85]

State Route 829[edit]

State Route 829
Location: Sylvania
Existed: 1990[91][101]–1993[82][83]

State Route 829 was a proposed state highway that was planned just south of Sylvania. In 1988, an unnumbered road was built from US 301/SR 73 at the southern terminus of SR 73 Loop south-southwest of Sylvania to SR 21 southeast of the city.[19][21] In 1990, the unnumbered road south of Sylvania was designated as SR 829.[91][101] In 1993, the path of SR 21 in the Sylvania area was shifted south-southwest, replacing the path of SR 829 and then routed on US 301/SR 73 Loop. Its former path was redesignated as SR 21 Bus.[82][83]

The entire route was in Screven County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
US 301 / SR 73 / SR 73 Loop north Western terminus of SR 829; southern terminus of SR 73 Loop
SR 21 Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 831[edit]

State Route 831
Location: Decatur County

State Route 831 (SR 831) was a proposed state highway in the southeastern part of Decatur County. In 1989, it was proposed as an eastern bypass of Attapulgus, from east-southeast of the city to north-northwest of it.[21][91] In 1995, US 27/SR 1 was shifted onto this bypass. Its former path was redesignated as SR 1 Bus.[84][85]

State Route 835[edit]

State Route 835
Location: Habersham County

State Route 835 (SR 835) was a proposed state highway that was planned for the northern part of Habersham County. In 1989, it was proposed as an eastern bypass of Hollywood and Turnerville, from SR 17 just south of Hollywood to US 23/US 441/SR 15 south-southwest of Tallulah Falls.[21][91] In 1993, the path of US 23/US 441/SR 15, from Hollywood to Tallulah Falls, was shifted eastward, onto the proposed path of SR 835.[82][83]

State Route 838[edit]

State Route 838
Location: Early County

State Route 838 (SR 838) was a proposed state highway in the north-central part of Early County. In 1992, it was proposed as an eastern bypass of Blakely, from south-southeast of the city to north-northeast of it.[108][82] The next year, US 27/SR 1 in the Blakely area was shifted eastward, onto the path of SR 838. The former path through the city became US 27 Bus./SR 1 Bus.[82][83]

State Route 844[edit]

State Route 844
Location: Dublin

State Route 844 (SR 844) was a proposed state highway in the north-central part of Laurens County. Between the beginning of 1966 and the beginning of 1972, it was proposed as a western bypass of Dublin, from US 319/US 441/SR 31 south of the city to US 441/SR 29 north-northwest of it.[136][137] By the beginning of 1977, this highway was canceled.[137][138]

State Route 847[edit]

State Route 847
Location: Randolph County

State Route 847 (SR 847) was a proposed state highway in the central part of Randolph County. In 1993, it was proposed as a southeastern bypass of Cuthbert, from south-southwest of the city to north-northeast of it.[82][83] The next year, the path of US 27/SR 1 through the Cuthbert area was shifted eastward, onto the proposed path of SR 847. The former path was redesignated as US 27 Bus./SR 1 Bus.[139][140]

State Route 863[edit]

State Route 863
Location: Effingham County

State Route 863 (SR 863) was a proposed state highway that was planned for the central part of Effingham County. In 1993, it was proposed as a western bypass of Springfield, from SR 21 south-southeast of the city to another intersection with SR 21 northwest of it.[82][83] In 1997, the path of SR 21 in the Springfield area was shifted westward, replacing the proposed path of SR 863.[98][99]

State Route 876[edit]

State Route 876
Location: Banks County

State Route 876 (SR 876) was a proposed state highway for the south-central part of Banks County, southeast of Hollingsworth. In 1992, it was proposed as a southeastern bypass of Hollingsworth, from US 441/SR 15 south-southeast of Hollingsworth to SR 198 southeast of the community.[108][82] In 1997, the path of US 441/SR 15, from Homer to Cornelia, was shifted eastward, onto the proposed path of SR 876.[98][99]

State Route 877[edit]

State Route 877
Location: Banks County

State Route 877 (SR 877) was a proposed state highway that was planned for the north-central part of Banks County. In 1992, a cutoff, north-northeast of Hollingsworth, was proposed as an unnumbered road from Hollingsworth to US 441/SR 15 north-northwest of it.[108][82] Two years later, the cutoff north-northeast of Hollingsworth, was then proposed as SR 877 and extended to SR 105 just east of the southern end of its concurrency with US 441/SR 15.[83][84] In 2002, SR 877 was canceled.[126][130]

State Route 899[edit]

State Route 899
Location: Gray

State Route 899 (SR 899) was a proposed state highway that was planned as a northern bypass of Gray. Between the beginning of 1996 and the beginning of 2010, it was proposed from US 129/SR 11/SR 18/SR 22 southwest of Clinton, at the west end of SR 18's concurrency with US 129/SR 11/SR 22, to SR 22 east-northeast of Gray.[141][142] In 2016, this bypass was canceled.[143][144]

State Route 901[edit]

State Route 901
Location: Athens

State Route 901 (SR 901) was a proposed state highway that was planned within the city limits of Athens. In 1992, it was proposed as a slightly western rerouting of US 129/US 441/SR 15 in the southern part of Athens. Its path was from US 129/US 441/SR 15 southwest of their southern interchange with what is now SR 10 Loop north-northwest to Timothy Road just north of the freeway.[108][82] In 2001, the path of US 129/US 441/SR 15 in the southern part of Athens was shifted westward, onto the proposed path of SR 901 south of the freeway.[125][126]

State Route 932[edit]

State Route 932
Location: Gray

State Route 932 (SR 932) was a proposed state highway that was planned inside the city limits of Gray. In 1993, it was proposed as a southern bypass of the main part of the city, from US 129/SR 11/SR 18/SR 22 in the southwestern part to SR 22 east-northeast of the city.[82][83] The next year, the proposed path of SR 932 was truncated to SR 18 in the southeastern part of Gray.[83][84] In 1998, the path of SR 18 in Gray was shifted southward, replacing the proposed path of SR 932.[99][131]

State Route 1011[edit]

State Route 1011
Location: Columbia County

State Route 1011 (SR 1011) was a short proposed state highway that was planned for the southeastern part of Columbia County. Between January 1964 and January 1970, it was proposed from SR 28 west-northwest of Martinez east-northeast to Blackstone Camp Road.[145][146] By January 1975, it was canceled.[146][147] Between January 1997 and January 2009, this proposed path would be used as a northward shifting of the southern terminus of Blackstone Camp Road. Its former path was renamed simply Old Blackstone Camp Road.[148][149]

State Route 1056[edit]

State Route 1056
Location: Martinez
Existed: 2008[148][149]–2012[149][150]

State Route 1056 (SR 1056) was a short state highway that existed in the central part of Martinez. Between January 1997 and January 2009, it was established on Davis Road from either Executive Center Drive or King Road west-northwest to SR 104 (Washington Road).[148][149] By January 2013, it was decommissioned.[149][150]

The entire route was in Martinez, Columbia County.

mi km Destinations Notes
Executive Center Drive Southern terminus; terminus could have been at King Road.
SR 104 (Washington Road) Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

State Route 1082[edit]

State Route 1082
Location: Evans and Martinez
Existed: 2008[148][149]–2012[149][150]

State Route 1082 (SR 1082) was a state highway that existed entirely in Martinez with portions proposed in Evans and Martinez. Between January 1997 and January 2009, it had three proposed segments and one signed portion. The westernmost segment was proposed from SR 104 (Washington Road) at the northern terminus of Towne Centre Drive east-southeast to Rountree Way, just southeast of Columbia Industrial Boulevard. The second portion was from Rountree Way, just northwest of Columbia Industrial Boulevard, east-northeast slightly to Columbia Industrial Boulevard. The third portion was from Blue Ridge Drive, just southwest of its southern intersection with Halifax Drive, to Old Evans Road, just south-southeast of Old Petersburg Road. The fourth portion, which was indicated to be signed, was on Old Petersburg Road, from Old Evans Road east-southeast and southeast to Baston Road.[148][149] By January 2013, the second and third segments were canceled, and the fourth segment was decommissioned.[149][150] By January 2017, the first segment was canceled.[150][151]

The entire route was in Columbia County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
Evans SR 104 (Washington Road) Western terminus of segment 1
Martinez Rountree Way Eastern terminus of segment 1
Gap in route
Evans Rountree Way Western terminus of segment 2
Martinez Columbia Industrial Boulevard Eastern terminus of segment 2
Gap in route
Martinez Blue Ridge Drive Western terminus of segment 3
Old Evans Road Eastern terminus of segment 3
Gap in route
Martinez Old Evans Road Western terminus of segment 4
Baston Road, Old Petersburg Road east Eastern terminus of segment 4
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
  •       Unopened

State Route 1109[edit]

State Route 1109
Location: Springfield

State Route 1109 (SR 1109) was a proposed state highway that was planned for the central part of Effingham County. Between the beginning of 1997 and the beginning of 2010, it was proposed as a northern bypass of Springfield, from SR 21 north-northwest of the city to SR 119 in the northern part of the city.[152][153] Between the beginning of 2012 and the beginning of 2015, SR 1109 was canceled.[154][155]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba Georgia Department of Transportation (1984). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1984–85 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as Georgia Department of Transportation (1986). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1986–87 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah State Highway Department of Georgia (1954). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 14, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1954.)
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at State Highway Department of Georgia (1955). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 14, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1955.)
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn State Highway Department of Georgia (1957). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 18, 2017.  (Corrected to July 1, 1957.)
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1945). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh State Highway Department of Georgia (1946). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 14, 2017.  (Corrected to November 7, 1946.)
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq State Highway Department of Georgia (1920). System of State Aid Roads as Approved Representing 4800 Miles of State Aid Roads Outside the Limits of the Incorporated Towns (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo State Highway Department of Georgia (1921). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1926). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1929). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc State Highway Department of Georgia (1949). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 18, 2017.  (Corrected to April 1, 1949.)
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an State Highway Department of Georgia (1950). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 18, 2017.  (Corrected to August 1, 1950.)
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1973). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 27, 2017. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1974). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1974–75 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 18, 2017. 
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs State Highway Department of Georgia (1960). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map) (1960–61 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 18, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1960.)
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf State Highway Department of Georgia (1948). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 15, 2017.  (Corrected to February 28, 1948.)
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai Georgia Department of Transportation (1987). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1987–88 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 30, 2017. 
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad