Tom McCarthy (director)

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Tom McCarthy
Tom McCarthy (cropped).jpg
Born Thomas Joseph McCarthy
(1966-06-07) June 7, 1966 (age 50)
New Jersey, United States
Occupation Actor, film director, screenwriter
Years active 1992–present

Thomas Joseph "Tom" McCarthy[1] (born June 7, 1966)[2] is an American film director, screenwriter, and actor who has appeared in several films, including Meet the Parents and Good Night, and Good Luck, and television series such as The Wire, Boston Public, Law & Order, and the Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation of Saint Maybe.

McCarthy has received critical acclaim for his writing/direction work for the independent films The Station Agent (2003), The Visitor (2007), Win Win (2011), and Spotlight (2015), the latter of which won the Academy Award for Best Picture, won McCarthy the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay, and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Director.

Additionally, McCarthy co-wrote the film Up (2009) with Bob Peterson and Pete Docter, for which they received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay. McCarthy also wrote the film Million Dollar Arm (2014).

Life and career[edit]

McCarthy was raised in New Providence, New Jersey, one of five children of Carol and Eugene F. "Gene" McCarthy.[3][4] His father worked in the textile industry.[5] He was raised Catholic, in a family of Irish descent.[6] McCarthy is a graduate of New Providence High School in New Providence, New Jersey; Boston College, Class of 1988; and the Yale School of Drama,[7] where he studied under Earle R. Gister.

McCarthy spent several years doing stand-up comedy and theater in Minneapolis and Chicago before going into television and film.[8] He starred in Flags of Our Fathers as James Bradley and the final season of The Wire as a morally challenged reporter named Scott Templeton. He made his Broadway debut in the 2001 revival of Noises Off! [9]

McCarthy's directorial debut, The Station Agent, which he also wrote, won the Audience Award and the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award at the 2003 Sundance Film Festival. The film also won the BAFTA Award for Best Original Screenplay and the Independent Spirit Award for Best First Screenplay and the Independent Spirit John Cassavetes Award. The Station Agent also won awards at film festivals ranging from San Sebastian to Stockholm, Mexico City, and Aspen.[10]

McCarthy's second feature film was The Visitor, which premiered at the 2007 Toronto International Film Festival. For The Visitor, McCarthy won the 2008 Independent Spirit Award for Best Director.[11] McCarthy appeared in the 2009 dramas The Lovely Bones and 2012.[12][13] In 2010, McCarthy was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for the animated film Up.

He also co-wrote and directed 2011's Win Win based on his experiences as a wrestler at New Providence High School.[14]

McCarthy's most recent film, the independent drama film Spotlight, received widespread acclaim following its release in 2015. The film received 6 Academy Awards nominations, 3 Golden Globe Awards nominations, 2 Screen Actors Guild Awards nominations, and 8 Critics' Choice Movie Awards nominations.

In February 2016, it was announced McCarthy will direct the first two episodes of 13 Reasons Why, from Anonymous Content and Paramount Television. The show is based on the 2007 New York Times bestselling YA book by Jay Asher.[15]

Filmography[edit]

Directing/writer credits[edit]

Year Title Credit Notes
Director Writer Producer
2003 The Station Agent Yes Yes BAFTA Award for Best Original Screenplay
Independent Spirit Award for Best First Screenplay
Independent Spirit John Cassavetes Award
Las Vegas Film Critics Society Award for Best Screenplay
Sundance Film Festival Audience Award (Dramatic)
Sundance Film Festival Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award
Nominated – Satellite Award for Best Original Screenplay
Nominated – Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay
2007 The Visitor Yes Yes Brisbane International Film Festival Interfaith Award
Deauville American Film Festival Grand Special Prize
Independent Spirit Award for Best Director
Method Fest Independent Film Festival Award for Best Director
Satellite Award for Best Original Screenplay
Nominated – Satellite Award for Best Director
Nominated – Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay
2009 Up Yes Story writer
Nominated – Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay
Nominated – Annie Award for Writing in a Feature Production
Nominated – BAFTA Award for Best Original Screenplay
Nominated – Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation – Long Form
2010 Game of Thrones Yes Unaired pilot
2011 Yes Consulting producer, Episode: "Winter Is Coming"
Win Win Yes Yes Yes
2014 Million Dollar Arm Yes
The Cobbler Yes Yes Nominated - Saturn Award for Best DVD or Blu-ray Release
2015 Spotlight Yes Yes Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay
AACTA International Award for Best Screenplay
Alliance of Women Film Journalists Award for Best Director
Alliance of Women Film Journalists Award for Best Original Screenplay
Awards Circuit Community Award for Best Director
Awards Circuit Community Award for Best Original Screenplay
BAFTA Award for Best Original Screenplay
Boston Online Film Critics Association Award for Best Original Screenplay
Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Screenplay
Central Ohio Film Critics Association Award for Best Director
Central Ohio Film Critics Association Award for Best Original Screenplay
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Original Screenplay
Chicago International Film Festival Best Narrative English-Language Feature
Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Screenplay
Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Screenplay
Denver Film Critics Society Award for Best Original Screenplay
Detroit Film Critics Society Award for Best Original Screenplay
Florida Film Critics Circle Award for Best Screenplay
Independent Spirit Award for Best Director
Independent Spirit Award for Best Screenplay
London Film Critics' Circle Award for Screenwriter of the Year
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Screenplay
National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Screenplay
Satellite Award for Best Director
Satellite Award for Best Original Screenplay
Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay
Nominated – Academy Award for Best Director
Nominated – Austin Film Critics Association Award for Best Director
Nominated – Austin Film Critics Association Award for Best Original Screenplay
Nominated – Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Director
Nominated – Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Director
Nominated – Denver Film Critics Society Award for Best Director
Nominated – Detroit Film Critics Society Award for Best Director
Nominated – Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directing – Feature Film
Nominated – Florida Film Critics Circle Award for Best Director
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Director
Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Screenplay
Nominated – National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Director
Nominated – Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Original Screenplay

Acting credits in film[edit]

Year Title Credit Notes
Role
1992 Crossing the Bridge Chris
1993 Rift Bartender #1
1997 Conspiracy Theory Helicopter Spotter
1998 In My Sister's Shadow Michael Butler
1999 30 Days Brad Drazin
2000 Certain Guys Mitch
Meet the Parents Dr. Bob Banks
2002 The Guru Lars
2004 The Last Shot Agent Pike
2005 Good Night, and Good Luck Palmer Williams
Syriana Fred Franks
The Great New Wonderful David Burbage
2006 All the King's Men Editor
The Situation Major Hanks
Beautiful Ohio Older William Messerman
Flags of Our Fathers James Bradley
2007 Year of the Dog Pier
Michael Clayton Walter Voice only
2008 Baby Mama Kate's Date
2009 Mammoth Bob
Duplicity Jeff Bauer
The Lovely Bones Principal Caden
2012 Gordon Silberman
2010 Jack Goes Boating Dr. Bob
Fair Game Jeff
Little Fockers Dr. Bob
2015 Pixels Michael the Robot

Acting credits in television[edit]

Year Title Credit Notes
Role
1996 Mary & Tim Tim Melville [16]
1996 New York Undercover Gus Farina Episode: "Toy Soldiers"
1998 Saint Maybe Ian Bedloe
1998 Spin City Priest Episode: "Bye, Bye, Birdie"
2000 D.C. Joseph Scott Episode: "Truth"
2000 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Nick Ganzer Episode: "Contact"
2000 Ally McBeal Peter Hanks Episode: "Do You Wanna Dance?"
2000–2001 Boston Public Kevin Riley 14 episodes
2001 The Practice Kevin Riley Episode: "The Day After"
2002–2008 Law & Order Donald Housman 3 episodes
2008 The Wire Scott Templeton 10 episodes

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Thomas McCarthy Biography ((?)-)". 
  2. ^ Jessica Iredale. "Boys' Night Out With Tom McCarthy". WWD. 
  3. ^ "Thomas McCarthy on His First Cast". Wall Street Journal. 18 March 2015. 
  4. ^ "Obituary: Eugene F. McCarthy of New Providence". Independent Press. NJ.com. March 25, 2013. 
  5. ^ Hoby, Hermione (May 20, 2011). "The 'man strength' behind Win Win's Thomas McCarthy". The Guardian. 
  6. ^ "Tom McCarthy Speaks About Opening 'Spotlight' In Catholic Italy, How He Cast Michael Keaton, And How Journalism Is Deteriorating". Variety. September 3, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Five Yalies nominated for Academy Awards; two take home the prize". yale.edu. March 2, 2016. 
  8. ^ "'Spotlight' writer-director Tom McCarthy on his time as a Chicago theater actor". Chicago Tribune. November 10, 2015. 
  9. ^ Wiltz, Teresa (September 3, 2001). "Down to "The Wire": It's a Wrap for Gritty TV Series". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2007-09-03. 
  10. ^ "The Station Agent – Awards". Retrieved 2008-03-14. 
  11. ^ Siegel, Tatiana (2009-02-23). "'The Wrestler' tops Spirit Awards". Variety. Retrieved 2009-04-02. 
  12. ^ "HBO: The Wire: Inside". HBO. 
  13. ^ [1][dead link]
  14. ^ Angelo, Megan. "Just Like the Good Old Days in the Ring", The New York Times, March 18, 2011. Accessed July 25, 2012. ""I just called Joe and said, ‘Let’s develop a movie based on New Providence wrestling,’ " Mr. McCarthy said.... Because of tax credits, they shot on Long Island rather than in New Providence. But they scouted locations tirelessly, most notably the office and home that Mr. Giamatti’s character shuttles between.... Though the locations might have been fudged, the filmmakers kept New Providence High School in the film by using its banners, uniforms and wrestling mats, an effort facilitated by one of their former classmates, who’s now the school’s principal."
  15. ^ Andreeva, Nellie. [2], "Deadline", February 25, 2016. Accessed July 16, 2016.
  16. ^ Havan_IronOak (3 November 1996). "Mary & Tim (TV Movie 1996)". IMDb. 

External links[edit]