EDMA

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EDMA
EDMA.png
Systematic (IUPAC) name
1-(2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-N-methylpropan-2-amine
Clinical data
Legal status Uncontrolled (but may be covered under the Federal Analogue Act in the United States and under similar bills in other countries)
Routes Oral
Identifiers
ATC code None
PubChem CID 24257269
ChemSpider 23553090 YesY
Chemical data
Formula C12H17NO2 
Mol. mass 207.269
 YesY (what is this?)  (verify)
This article is about the amphetamine. For other uses, see EDMA (disambiguation).

3,4-Ethylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (EDMA) is an entactogen drug of the amphetamine class.[1][2] It is an analogue of MDMA where the methylenedioxy ring has been replaced by an ethylenedioxy ring.[1][2] EDMA was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin.[1] In his book PiHKAL, the dosage is listed as 150–250 mg, and the duration listed as 3–5 hours.[1] According to Shulgin, EDMA produces a bare threshold consisting of paresthesia, nystagmus, and hypnogogic imagery, with few to no other effects.[1] Scientific research has demonstrated that EDMA acts as a non-neurotoxic serotonin releasing agent with moderately diminished potency relative to MDMA, and with negligible effects on dopamine release.[2] Based on Shulgin's reports of essential inactivity at 150–250 mg, it may be more active at higher doses.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Ann Shulgin; Alexander Shulgin (1991). Pihkal: A Chemical Love Story. Transform Press. ISBN 0-9630096-0-5. 
  2. ^ a b c McKenna DJ, Guan XM, Shulgin AT (March 1991). "3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) analogues exhibit differential effects on synaptosomal release of 3H-dopamine and 3H-5-hydroxytryptamine". Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior 38 (3): 505–12. doi:10.1016/0091-3057(91)90005-M. PMID 1829838. 

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