List of Catholic bishops of the United States

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Each diocese is led by a bishop. In the United States, all archbishops (except one) are provincial metropolitans. Each color represents one of the 32 Latin Church provinces.

The following is a list of bishops of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States, including its five overseas dependencies. The U.S. Catholic Church comprises 177 Latin Church dioceses and 17 Eastern Catholic eparchies led by diocesan bishops or eparchs, and an apostolic exarchate,[1] the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA, and the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter; the Personal Ordinary—though not a bishop—is the equivalent of a diocesan bishop in canon law.[2][3]

The 177 Latin dioceses are divided into 32 ecclesiastical provinces. Each province has a metropolitan archdiocese — led by an archbishop — and at least one suffragan diocese. In some cases, a titular archbishop is named diocesan bishop of a diocese that is not a metropolitan archdiocese, for example, Archbishop Celestine Damiano, Bishop of Camden (New Jersey). In most archdioceses and some large dioceses, one or more auxiliary bishops serve in association with the diocesan bishop. There are also two Eastern Catholic metropoliae. The four Byzantine Catholic eparchies constitute one metropolia, with Pittsburgh as the metropolitan see, led by a metropolitan archbishop. Similarly, the four Ukrainian Catholic eparchies constitute one metropolia, with Philadelphia as the metropolitan see. (One archbishop—that of the Archdiocese for the Military Services—is not a metropolitan.) As of February 2012, five of these metropolitans are cardinals of the Catholic Church: Boston (Seán O'Malley), Chicago (Francis George), Galveston-Houston (Daniel DiNardo), New York (Timothy Dolan), and Washington (Donald Wuerl). Four other archdioceses have retired archbishops who are cardinals: Baltimore (William Keeler), Detroit (Adam Maida), Los Angeles (Roger Mahony), and Philadelphia (Justin Rigali).

All active and retired bishops in the United States and the Territory of the U.S. Virgin Islands—diocesan, coadjutor, and auxiliary—are members of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB).

In addition to the 195 dioceses, one exarchate, and one personal ordinariate, there are several dioceses in the nation's other four overseas dependencies. In the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the bishops in the six dioceses (one metropolitan archdiocese and five suffragan dioceses) form their own episcopal conference, the Conferencia Episcopal Puertorriqueña.[4][5] The bishops in U.S. insular areas in the Pacific Ocean—the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Territory of American Samoa, and the Territory of Guam—are members of the Episcopal Conference of the Pacific.

Province of Anchorage[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Anchorage
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Anchorage

The Metropolitan Province of Anchorage comprises the state of Alaska.

Province of Atlanta[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Atlanta
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Atlanta

The Metropolitan Province of Atlanta comprises the states of Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

Province of Baltimore[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Baltimore
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Baltimore

The Metropolitan Province of Baltimore comprises the majority of the state of Maryland (the counties of Calvert, Charles, Montgomery, Prince George's and Saint Mary's are part of the Province of Washington), and all of the states of Delaware, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Province of Boston[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Boston
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Boston

The Metropolitan Province of Boston comprises the states of Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont.

Province of Chicago[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of Chicago.
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Chicago

The Metropolitan Province of Chicago comprises the state of Illinois.

Province of Cincinnati[edit]

Map of the ecclesiastical Province of Cincinnati.
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Cincinnati

The Metropolitan Province of Cincinnati comprises the state of Ohio.

Province of Denver[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Denver
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Denver

The Metropolitan Province of Denver comprises the states of Colorado and Wyoming and those parts of Idaho and Montana that are within Yellowstone National Park (all of which is part of the Diocese of Cheyenne).

Province of Detroit[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of Detroit
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Detroit

The Metropolitan Province of Detroit comprises the state of Michigan.

Province of Dubuque[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Dubuque
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Dubuque

The Metropolitan Province of Dubuque comprises the state of Iowa.

Province of Galveston-Houston[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of Galveston-Houston
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Galveston–Houston

The Metropolitan Province of Galveston-Houston comprises the eastern counties of the state of Texas.

Province of Hartford[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Hartford
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Hartford

The Metropolitan Province of Hartford comprises the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island, and Fishers Island, New York.

Province of Indianapolis[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of Indianapolis
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Indianapolis

The Metropolitan Province of Indianapolis comprises the state of Indiana.

Province of Kansas City[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of Kansas City
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Kansas City

The Metropolitan Province of Kansas City comprises the state of Kansas.

Province of Los Angeles[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of Los Angeles
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Los Angeles

The Metropolitan Province of Los Angeles comprises the southern counties of the state of California.

Province of Louisville[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Louisville
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Louisville

The Metropolitan Province of Louisville comprises the states of Kentucky and Tennessee.

Province of Miami[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of Miami
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Miami

The Metropolitan Province of Miami comprises the state of Florida.

Province of Milwaukee[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Milwaukee
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Milwaukee

The Metropolitan Province of Milwaukee comprises the state of Wisconsin.

Province of Mobile[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Mobile
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Mobile

The Metropolitan Province of Mobile comprises the states of Alabama and Mississippi.

Province of New Orleans[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of New Orleans
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of New Orleans

The Metropolitan Province of New Orleans comprises the state of Louisiana.

Province of New York[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of New York
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of New York

The Metropolitan Province of New York comprises the state of New York, except Fishers Island (in Suffolk County), which is part of the Diocese of Norwich (in the Province of Hartford).

Province of Newark[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of Newark
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Newark

The Metropolitan Province of Newark comprises the state of New Jersey.

Province of Oklahoma City[edit]

Province of Oklahoma City
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Oklahoma City

The Metropolitan Province of Oklahoma City comprises the states of Arkansas and Oklahoma.

Province of Omaha[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Omaha
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Omaha

The Metropolitan Province of Omaha comprises the state of Nebraska.

Province of Philadelphia[edit]

See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Philadelphia
Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of Philadelphia.

The Metropolitan Province of Philadelphia comprises the state of Pennsylvania.

Province of Portland[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Portland
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Portland

The Metropolitan Province of Portland comprises the states of Idaho, Montana and Oregon, except those parts of Idaho and Montana that are within Yellowstone National Park (all of which is part of the Diocese of Cheyenne, in the Province of Denver).

Province of Saint Louis[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of St. Louis
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Saint Louis

The Metropolitan Province of Saint Louis comprises the state of Missouri.

Province of Saint Paul and Minneapolis[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of St. Paul & Minneapolis
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Saint Paul and Minneapolis

The Metropolitan Province of Saint Paul and Minneapolis comprises the states of Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota.

Province of San Antonio[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of San Antonio
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of San Antonio

The Metropolitan Province of San Antonio comprises the western counties of the state of Texas.

Province of San Francisco[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of San Francisco
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of San Francisco

The Metropolitan Province of San Francisco comprises the northern counties of the state of California and all of the states of Hawaii, Nevada and Utah.

Province of Santa Fe[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Santa Fe
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Santa Fe

The Metropolitan Province of Santa Fe comprises the states of Arizona and New Mexico.

Province of Seattle[edit]

Map of the Ecclesiastical Province of Seattle
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Seattle

The Metropolitan Province of Seattle comprises the state of Washington.

Province of Washington, D.C.[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of Washington
See: Category:Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Washington

The Metropolitan Province of Washington, D.C., comprises the District of Columbia, the Maryland counties of Calvert, Charles, Montgomery, Prince George's and Saint Mary's, and —as its only suffragan—a United States overseas dependency, the Territory of the Virgin Islands.

Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA[edit]

In 1939, Pope Pius XII canonically erected a military ordinariate for members of the Armed Forces of the United States serving domestically and abroad and their dependents. In 1985, Pope John Paul II elevated the ordinariate to the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA. The archdiocese serves members of and others employed by the United States military, the Veterans Health Administration and its patients, and Americans in government service overseas. The jurisdiction of the Archdiocese extends to any United States government property both in the United States and abroad, including all military installations and U.S. embassies, consulates and other diplomatic missions. The archbishop oversees bishops and priests working at military installations worldwide, and is assisted by auxiliary bishops.

Metropolia of Philadelphia for the Ukrainians[edit]

Metropolia of Philadelphia
See: Category:Ukrainian Catholic Metropolia of Philadelphia

The Ukrainian Catholic Metropolitan Province of Philadelphia consists of four eparchies of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, and covers the entire United States.

Metropolia of Pittsburgh for the Ruthenians[edit]

Metropolia of Pittsburgh
See: Category:Byzantine Catholic Metropolia of Pittsburgh

The Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Province of Pittsburgh is a sui iuris metropolia, traditionally linked to the Ruthenian Catholic Church. The metropolia consists of four eparchies of the Byzantine Ruthenian Catholic Church and covers the entire United States, with jurisdiction for all Ruthenian Catholics in the United States, as well as other Byzantine Rite Catholics without an established hierarchy in the country.

Other Eastern Catholic bishops[edit]

The other Eastern Catholic Churches with eparchies (dioceses) or exarchates established in the United States are not grouped into metropoliae. All are immediately subject to the Holy See, with limited oversight by the head of their respective sui iuris churches.

Armenian Catholic Church
Chaldean Catholic Church
Maronite Church
Melkite Greek Catholic Church
Romanian Byzantine Catholic Church
Syrian Catholic Church
Syro-Malabar Catholic Church
Syro-Malankara Catholic Church

Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter[edit]

Province of Agaña[edit]

The Metropolitan Province of Agaña includes (1) the United States overseas dependencies of the Territory of Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, (2) Wake Island, an unorganized, unincorporated territory of the U.S., and (3) the sovereign and independent nations of the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau. (The bishops in U.S. insular areas in the Pacific Ocean—the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Territory of American Samoa, and the Territory of Guam—are members of the Episcopal Conference of the Pacific.)

Province of Samoa-Apia[edit]

Catholic dioceses of the Samoa Islands

The Metropolitan Province of Samoa-Apia is foreign to the United States, but it includes—as its only suffragan—a diocese that comprises a United States overseas dependency, the Territory of American Samoa. (The bishops in U.S. insular areas in the Pacific Ocean—the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Territory of American Samoa, and the Territory of Guam—are members of the Episcopal Conference of the Pacific.)

Province of San Juan de Puerto Rico[edit]

Ecclesiastical Province of San Juan de Puerto Rico

The Metropolitan Province of San Juan de Puerto Rico comprises the United States Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. (The bishops of the province form their own episcopal conference, the Conferencia Episcopal Puertorriqueña.)[4][5]

American bishops serving outside the United States[edit]

See also: List of heads of the diplomatic missions of the Holy See (sortable by papal representative's last name)

Non-American bishops serving in the United States[edit]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ On July 14, 2010, Pope Benedict XVI erected an apostolic exarchate (similar to an apostolic vicariate in the Latin Church)—the Syro-Malankara Catholic Exarchate in the United States—for Syro-Malankara Catholics in the United States. Although not the same as an eparchy, an exarchate is still led by a bishop.
  2. ^ See also: Apostolic prefect.
  3. ^ a b Hays, Charlotte (January 3, 2012). "Carrying Anglican Patrimony Into the Catholic Church: Former Episcopal bishop of southwestern diocese, a married father and grandfather, will lead Church’s personal ordinariate for Anglicans and Episcopalians who become Catholic". National Catholic Register. Retrieved January 12, 2012. "Father Steenson, former bishop of the Episcopal Church’s Diocese of Rio Grande, will be a member of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and entitled to wear a miter, but he will not have the title of bishop, which can only be conferred on an unmarried man." 
  4. ^ a b Conferencia "Episcopal Puertorriqueña (C.E.P.)". GCatholic.org. Retrieved February 13, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b Cheney, David M. "Catholic Church in Puerto Rico". Retrieved July 27, 2009. 
  6. ^ See Syrian Catholic Church#Organization.
  7. ^ Fraga, Brian (January 15, 2012). "Pope Benedict XVI creates U.S. ordinariate: Headed by a former Episcopal bishop, it will be based in Houston". Our Sunday Visitor. Retrieved January 12, 2012. "Father Steenson, who in 2009 was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, N.M., created the formation program for Anglican clergy seeking to become priests in the ordinariate. He will be installed as the ordinary Feb. 19." 
  8. ^ a b c d e f See: Nuncio#List of diplomatic posts of the Holy See.
  9. ^ Ordained a priest in 1970. Cheney, David M., Archbishop Edward Joseph Adams. Catholic-Hierarchy.org. Retrieved March 8, 2010.
  10. ^ Two Americans receive new assignments as Vatican diplomats, Catholic News Service News Briefs 18 January, 2013(Retrieved January 20, 2013)
  11. ^ Ordained a priest in 1976. Cheney, David M., Archbishop Charles Daniel Balvo. Catholic-Hierarchy.org. Retrieved April 19, 2010.
  12. ^ Ordained a priest in 1962. Retired on February 2, 2013. Cheney, David M., Bishop Luis Morgan Casey. Catholic-Hierarchy.org. Retrieved 2014-03-02. See also: List of Roman Catholic dioceses in Bolivia#''Sui iuris'' Jurisdictions.
  13. ^ Ordained a priest in 1976. Cheney, David M., Archbishop Thomas Edward Gullickson. Catholic-Hierarchy.org. Retrieved October 17, 2011.
  14. ^ Ordained a priest in 1979. Cheney, David M., Archbishop Joseph Salvador Marino. Catholic-Hierarchy.org. Retrieved October 8, 2009.
  15. ^ Simpson, Victor L (October 19, 2011). "Pope names US envoy". philly.com. Associated Press. Retrieved October 25, 2011. "The Washington post is a key one in the Vatican diplomatic corps both for the importance of the U.S. in world affairs and for its large Catholic population, which is counted on for its financial help to the Holy See and its contributions to papal charities." 

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