1965 in aviation

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Years in aviation: 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968
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Years: 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1965:

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

  • March 1 – The combat debut of the Republic F-105 Thunderchief takes place, as U.S. Air Force F-105D aircraft based at Da Nang Air Base, South Vietnam, begin bombing missions over North Vietnam.[7]
  • March 2 – Operation Rolling Thunder, a massive American air campaign against North Vietnam, begins.
  • March 3 – The United States begins Operation Blue Tree, medium-altitude photographic reconnaissance and bomb damage assessment flights over North Vietnam.[6]
  • March 6 – A Sikorsky SH-3A Sea King makes the first non-stop helicopter flight across North America. The distance travelled is 2,116 miles (3,405 kilometres), a new record for helicopters.
  • March 8 – Aeroflot Flight 513, a Tupolev Tu-124V (registration CCCP-45028), stalls at an altitude of 40 to 50 meters (131 to 164 feet) immediately after take off from Kuibyshev Airport in Kuibyshev in the Soviet Union and crashes in a snow-covered field, killing 30 of the 39 people on board.[8]
  • March 16 – Flying a MiG Ye-155, Soviet test pilot Alexander V. Fedotov achieves an average speed of 2,319.12 km/h (1,440.17 mph) over a 1,000-km (621-mile) circuit. The flight sets new world speed records for the distance with a 2,000-kg (4,409-pound) payload, a 1,000-kg (2,205-pound) payload, and no payload.
  • March 31 – U.S. Marine Corps UH-34 transport helicopters escorted by U.S. Army UH-1B helicopter gunships come under heavy Viet Cong ground fire while attempting to drop off 435 South Vietnamese troops in a landing zone 25 miles (40 km) south of Da Nang, South Vietnam. Thirty-five helicopters become involved; three are shot down and 19 damaged.

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

  • The Royal Air Force carries out air strikes against Yemeni guerrillas near Aden.
  • American aircraft strike the Hanoi and Haiphong areas in North Vietnam for the first time.[14]
  • September 1 – As India and Pakistan fight for control of Kashmir in the Indo-Pakistani War of 1965, which had broken out in August, the Indian Army requests support from the Indian Air Force in defending against the Pakistan Army′s Operation Grand Slam. Pakistan Air Force F-86 Sabre fighters intercept 12 Indian de Havilland Vampires that are sent to strafe Pakistani tanks, shooting down three Vampires without loss to themselves. It is history′s first combat between the air forces of India and Pakistan since their independence from the United Kingdom.[29]
  • September 3 – Pakistan Air Force F-86 Sabre fighters intercept four Indian Air Force Dassault MD.454 Mystère IVa fighter-bombers over Kashmir. Luring the F-86s into a trap, the Mystères flee when the F-86s arrive, and four Indian Folland Gnat F.1 fighters intercept the F-86s. In the ensuing dogfight, Indian Squadron Leader Trevor Keelor fires his Gnat′s 30-mm cannons at an F-86 and claims to have shot it down, the first claim of an air-to-air victory in Indian Air Force history, although the Pakistanis report that the F-86 returns safely. One Gnat is lost when it lands at the Pakistani airfield at Pasrur after its pilot becomes lost and it runs low on fuel; the Pakistanis claim it surrendered to a Pakistani F-104 Starfighter.[30]
  • September 4
    • Flying a Pakistan Air Force F-104A Starfighter, Flight Lieutenant Aftab Alam Khan attacks four Indian Air Force Mystères strafing a passenger train and claims one shot down using a GAR-8 Sidewinder air-to-air missile, the first missile kill in the history of the Pakistan Air Force and the first in history by a Mach 2-capable aircraft of any country. India denies losing the Mystère, claiming an explosion Khan saw was merely the Mystère′s drop tank exploding after the Mystère pilot jettisoned it.[30]
    • A flight of three Pakistani F-86 Sabres flying at low altitude to attack the India′s Adampur Air Force Base intercepts four Indian Air Force Hawker Hunters at 500 feet (152 meters). During a turning dogfight that goes down to treetop level that reaches speeds as low as 200 knots (230 mph; 370 km/hr), Pakistan Air Force Squadron Leader Muhammad Mahmood Alam claims two Hunters shot down, although India acknowledges the loss of only one.[30]
    • Three Pakistani F-86 Sabres led by Squadron Leader Sarfaraz Ahmed Rafiqui engage two Indian Hawker Hunters over the Indian Air Force′s Halwara Air Force Station. After Rafiqui shoots down one Hunter, four more Indian Hunters arrive. In the ensuing low-level dogfight, the Pakistanis claim four Hunters destroyed, but two Pakistani Sabres are shot down, including that of Rafiqui, who ejects too low and is killed.[31]
  • September 7
    • After Indian Air Force Mystères surprise Pakistan′s PAF Base Sargodha at Sargodha, Pakistan, in a dawn raid, Pakistan Air Force Flight Lieutenant Amjad Hussain Khan sets off in pursuit of two Mystères in an F-104A Starfighter. After ejecting from his plane, he returns to the base later in the day after a journey by bicycle, horse, and helicopter, claiming to have shot down both Mystères, the second so close to his Starfighter that his engine ingested debris, forcing him to eject. India acknowledges the loss of only one Mystère, claiming that Khan actually fired at it twice, and credits its pilot, Squadron Leader Ajjamada B. Devaiah, with shooting down Khan′s F-104 before himself dying in action. Local villagers claim they saw the two aircraft collide and crash.[32]
    • Intercepting a second wave of Indian aircraft – seven Hawker Hunters – attacking PAF Sargodha, Squadron Leader Muhammad Mahmood Alam, flying an F-86F Sabre, claims one Hunter shot down with a GAR-8 Sidewinder and four more in only 30 seconds by gunfire, bringing his score to seven kills. India vigorously denies his claim, but numerous witnesses confirm the kills and two Hunters crash in Pakistan.[33]
    • Air combat in the Indo-Pakistani War. previously limited to Kashmir, spreads to East Pakistan, as the Indian Air Force sends two English Electric Canberra bombers based at Kalaikunda Air Force Station across the Bay of Bengal to strike the Pakistani Air Force F-86 Sabre base at Chittagong. They drop 1,000-pound (454-kg) bombs on the base, which is empty of aircraft, and the bombs do not explode. Then they are intercepted by Indian Air Force Hawker Hunters on their return flight, which initially mistake them for virtually identical Pakistani B-57 Canberra bombers before realizing that they are Indian Canberras. While the Canberras are on the ground apt Kalaikunda to rearm and refuel, Pakistan Air Force F-86s from Chittagong – which had staged through Tejgaon Airport in Dacca and thus had been absent from Chittagong during the Canberra raid – attack Kalaikunda and destroy both Canberras and four de Havilland Vampires. All the F-86s return safely. Nine Indian Hawker Hunters intercept a follow-up raid on Kalaikunda by Pakistani F-86s and shoot down one Sabre, killing its pilot, and damage another beyond repair.[33]
  • September 11 – The United States Army′s 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) arrives in South Vietnam with 400 helicopters.
  • September 13 – A new hot air balloon altitude record of 9,770 ft (2,978 m) is set.[who?][citation needed]
  • September 16 – Pakistan Air Force Squadron Leader Muhammad Mahmood Alam and his wingman encounter two Indian Hawker Hunters over Indian territory. Alam′s wingman is shot down, but Alam shoots down the Indian wingman and damages the other Hunter with a GAR-8 Sidewinder air-to-air missile. Although the Hunter returns to base, Pakistan credits Alam with two kills. His score of nine makes him Pakistan′s ace of aces.[34]
  • September 17 – The Pan American World Airways Boeing 707-120B Clipper Constitution, operating as Flight 292, crashes into Chances Peak on Montserrat, killing all 30 people on board. In 1957, the aircraft involved had been the first Boeing 707 to fly.
  • September 20 – A UH-2 Seasprite makes the U.S. Navy′s first helicopter rescue of a pilot downed in North Vietnam.
  • September 20–21 (overnight) – A Pakistan Air Force F-104 Starfighter makes a night interception of four Indian English Electra Canberra bombers as they fly toward India after a night raid on PAF Sargodha, shooting down one of them and killing one of its two-man crew.[34]
  • September 23 – A ceasefire brings the 1965 Indo-Pakistani War to an end. Neutral observers estimate that during the conflict India has lost an estimated 70 to 80 aircraft, while Pakistan has lost 20.[34]
  • September 27 – Flying Tiger Line takes delivery of its first jet aircraft, a Boeing 707.
  • September 30 – Republic Aviation becomes a division of the Fairchild-Hiller Corporation.[35]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

First flights[edit]

February[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

Entered service[edit]

April[edit]

May 1965[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Polmar, Norman, "Historic Aircraft: The King of the Sea", Naval History, February 2012, p. 13.
  2. ^ Scheina, Robert L., Latin America: A Naval History 1810-1987, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1987, ISBN 978-0-87021-295-6, p. 197.
  3. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, pp. 38-39.
  4. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, p. 14.
  5. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, p. 39.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Nichols, CDR John B., and Barret Tillman, On Yankee Station: The Naval Air War Over Vietnam, Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute, 1987, ISBN 978-0-87021-559-9, p. 152.
  7. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 408.
  8. ^ Aviation Safety Network Accident Description
  9. ^ Frantiska, Joseph, Jr., "Into the Dragon's Jaw", Military Heritage, December 2010, pp. 52-54, 57, 74.
  10. ^ Nichols, CDR John B., and Barret Tillman, On Yankee Station: The Naval Air War Over Vietnam, Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute, 1987, ISBN 978-0-87021-559-9, p. 152, which also claims this event occurred on April 3.
  11. ^ Polmar, Norman, "Historic Aircraft: The Last Photo Plane", Naval History, October 2010, p. 64.
  12. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 978-0-7607-0592-6, p. 91.
  13. ^ a b Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 92.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Nichols, CDR John B., and Barret Tillman, On Yankee Station: The Naval Air War Over Vietnam, Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute, 1987, ISBN 978-0-87021-559-9, p. 153.
  15. ^ a b Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, p. 41.
  16. ^ a b [1]
  17. ^ Nichols, CDR John B., and Barret Tillman, On Yankee Station: The Naval Air War Over Vietnam, Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute, 1987, ISBN 978-0-87021-559-9, pp. 8, 153.
  18. ^ Chronology of Significant Events in Naval Aviation: "Naval Air Transport" 1941 -- 1999
  19. ^ Langer, Emily, "Ernest Brace, longest-serving civilian Prisoner of War in Vietnam, dies at 83," washingtonpost.com, December 9, 2014, 7:30 p.m. EST.
  20. ^ Anonymous, "Ernest Brace, civilian POW in Vietnam, dies," Associated Press, December 9, 2014, 4:12 p.m. EST.
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  22. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 314.
  23. ^ a b c planecrashinfo.com Famous People Who Died in Aviation Accidents: 1960s
  24. ^ Haulman, Daniel L., One Hundred Years of Flight: USAF Chronology of Significant Air and Space Events, 1903-2002, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama: Air University Press, 2003, p. 96.
  25. ^ "US military plane crash off China". St. Petersburg Times. 24 August 1965. Retrieved 6 June 2011. 
  26. ^ "Hope wanes for 58 in crash". The Evening Independent. 25 August 1965. Retrieved 6 June 2011. 
  27. ^ Aviation Safety Network Hijacking Description
  28. ^ a b Koerner, Brendan I., The Skies Belong to Us: Love and Terror in the Golden Age of Hijacking, New York: Crown Publishers, 2013, ISBN 978-0-307-88610-1, p. 43.
  29. ^ Hollway, Don, "Air War Over Kashmir," Aviation History, May 2017, pp. 56-57.
  30. ^ a b c Hollway, Don, "Air War Over Kashmir," Aviation History, May 2017, p. 57.
  31. ^ Hollway, Don, "Air War Over Kashmir," Aviation History, May 2017, pp. 57-58.
  32. ^ Hollway, Don, "Air War Over Kashmir," Aviation History, May 2017, pp. 56, 58.
  33. ^ a b Hollway, Don, "Air War Over Kashmir," Aviation History, May 2017, p. 58.
  34. ^ a b c Hollway, Don, "Air War Over Kashmir," Aviation History, May 2017, p. 59.
  35. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 383.
  36. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, pp. 48, 120.
  37. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, pp. 55-58.
  38. ^ Aviation Safety Network Hijacking Description
  39. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, p. 50.
  40. ^ Aviation Safety Network Hijacking Description
  41. ^ skyjackeroftheday.tumblr.com "Skyjacker of the Day #37: Luis Medina Perez," May 13, 2013.
  42. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, p. 44.
  43. ^ Aviation Safety Network Accident Description
  44. ^ Chinnery, Philip D., Vietnam: The Helicopter War, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 978-1-55750-875-1, pp. 50-53.
  45. ^ Aviation Safety Network Hijacking Description
  46. ^ skyjackeroftheday.tumblr.com "Skyjacker of the Day #7: Thomas Robinson," June 13, 2013.
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  54. ^ Aviation Safety Network Hijacking Description
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