Isle of Wight (UK Parliament constituency)

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Coordinates: 50°41′02″N 1°19′12″W / 50.684°N 1.320°W / 50.684; -1.320

Isle of Wight
County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Location of Isle of Wight within England.
CountyIsle of Wight
Electorate105,448[1]
Current constituency
Created1832
Member of parliamentRobert "Bob" Seely (Conservative)
Number of membersOne
Created fromHampshire
Newtown
Yarmouth
Overlaps
European Parliament constituencySouth East England

Isle of Wight (/ˈwt/[2]) is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2017 by Bob Seely of the Conservative Party.

Created by the Great Reform Act for the 1832 general election it covers the whole of the Isle of Wight. It has the largest electorate of a constituency, since 1983.[n 2]

Boundaries[edit]

The Isle of Wight since 1832 makes up the geographic content of one seat of the House of Commons. It covers the same land as the ceremonial county of the Isle of Wight and the area administered by the unitary authority, Isle of Wight Council: a diamond-shaped island with rounded oblique corners, measuring 22.5 miles (36.2 km) by 13 miles (21 km), the Needles and similar small uninhabitable rocks of very small square surface area. The island is linked by ferry crossings from four points (five points if counting West Cowes and East Cowes separately) to three points in Hampshire: Lymington, Southampton and Portsmouth.

Its electorate of 110,924 (as of 2010)[3] is, by more than 30,000 electors, the largest in the UK, more than 50% above the English average: 71,537,[3] and five times the size of the smallest seat: Na h-Eileanan an Iar, formerly known as the Western Isles.[4]

One or two seats problem[edit]

The five (effected rather than abortive) national Boundary Commission Periodic Reports which have taken place since 1955 consulted locally on splitting the island into two seats (and included occasionally proposals for a seat crossing the Solent onto the mainland) but met an overall distaste by the independent commissioners and most consultees and consultation respondents who were not apathetic which accounted for the bulk. The consensus of varying panels of Boundary Commissioners, party-interested and neutral commentators was at the time of these five consultations, that the island would be best represented by one MP. The Commissioners did make mention perfunctorily of their duty by law to avoid such an extent of malapportionment (termed by most commissioners "leaving the island somewhat oversized") but deemed that electoral scientific detail outweighed by the "human" socio-economic factors of the convenience of having one universally acknowledged representative of the island at the national legislature. One problem the independent body cited in 2008 was a difficulty of dividing the island in two in a way that would be acceptable to (or widely accepted by) all major interests. The arbitrary division line problem is routinely encountered in those city council areas which have no rural elements or natural divides and in peninsulars and often resolves itself in dividing in alterate ways at different times to avoid any onset or perception of any bias.[5]

In the 2018 review underway, dividing the island into two separate seats (smaller rather than larger than the allowable range for mainland seats) is a requirement by law to match the other island seats.[6] The Commission's draft proposals divide the island into East and West seats.[7]

History[edit]

Before the Reform Act 1832 the island usually had three Parliamentary boroughs: Newport, Newtown, and Yarmouth each electing two MPs. In 1654 a whole island constituency existed for the First Protectorate Parliament but the island reverted to the three constituencies. Otherwise, the island was part-represented by the two MPs for Hampshire. The Reform Act abolished Newtown and Yarmouth parliamentary boroughs, and resurrected a county constituency for the whole island. The county electorate included freeholders, qualified by property, in the remaining parliamentary borough. The separate and overlapping Newport representation was abolished in 1885.

The constituency has traditionally been a battleground between the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats and their predecessors. The seat was held by a Liberal from 1974 until 1987,[8][9][10] a Conservative until 1997, a Liberal Democrat until 2001,[10][11] and a Conservative since then.[11] At the 2015 election, the incumbent Conservative scored one of his party's largest reductions in vote in that year's election similarly to the Liberal Democrat who finished in fifth place.

In the 2017 general election, Nick Belfitt, the Liberal Democrat candidate, became the youngest ever candidate to stand for the seat at the age of 23.[12]

Members of Parliament[edit]

Pre 1832[edit]

Since 1832[edit]

Andrew Turner (pictured in 2010) served as the MP from 2001 to 2017.
Election Member[13] Party
1832 Sir Richard Simeon, Bt Liberal
1837 William Holmes à Court Conservative
1847 John Simeon Whig[14][15][16]
1851 by-election Edward Dawes Radical[17][18][19]
1852 Francis Venables-Vernon-Harcourt Conservative
1857 Charles Clifford Whig[20]
1859 Liberal
1865 John Simeon Liberal
1870 by-election Alexander Baillie-Cochrane Conservative
1880 Evelyn Ashley Liberal
1885 Richard Webster Conservative
1900 John Seely Conservative
1904 Liberal
1906 Godfrey Baring Liberal
1910 Douglas Hall Conservative
1922 Sir Edgar Chatfeild-Clarke Liberal
1923 John Seely Liberal
1924 Peter Macdonald Conservative
1959 Mark Woodnutt Conservative
February 1974 Stephen Ross Liberal
1987 Barry Field Conservative
1997 Peter Brand Liberal Democrats
2001 Andrew Turner Conservative
2017 Bob Seely Conservative

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2017: Isle of Wight[21][22]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Bob Seely 38,190 51.3 +10.6
Labour Julian Critchley 17,121 23.0 +10.2
Green Vix Lowthion 12,915 17.3 +4.0
Liberal Democrat Nicholas Belfitt 2,740 3.7 -3.8
UKIP Daryll Pitcher 1,921 2.6 -18.6
Independent Julie Jones-Evans 1,592 2.1 N/A
Majority 21,069 28.3 +8.8
Turnout 74,479 67.3 +2.3
Registered electors 110,683
Conservative hold Swing +0.2
General Election 2015: Isle of Wight[23]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Andrew Turner[24] 28,591 40.7 -6.0
UKIP Iain McKie[25] 14,888 21.2 +17.7
Green Vix Lowthion[26] 9,404 13.4 +12.1
Labour Stewart Blackmore[24] 8,984 12.8 +1.2
Liberal Democrat David Goodall[27] 5,235 7.5 -24.2
Independent Ian Stephens[28] 3,198 4.5 N/A
Majority 13,703 19.5 +4.5
Turnout 70,300 65.0 +1.1
Registered electors 108,804
Conservative hold Swing -11.8
General Election 2010: Isle of Wight[29][30]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Andrew Turner 32,810 46.7 −2.3
Liberal Democrat Jill Wareham 22,283 31.7 +2.2
Labour Mark Chiverton 8,169 11.6 −5.6
UKIP Michael Tarrant 2,435 3.5 +0.1
BNP Geoff Clynch 1,457 2.1 N/A
English Democrat Ian Dunsire 1,233 1.8 N/A
Green Bob Keats 931 1.3 N/A
Middle England Party Paul Martin 616 0.9 N/A
Independent Pete Harris 175 0.2 N/A
Independent Paul Randle-Jolliffe 89 0.1 N/A
Independent Edward Corby 66 0.1 −0.7
Majority 10,527 15.0 -4.4
Turnout 70,264 63.9 +2.6
Registered electors 109,922
Conservative hold Swing -2.2

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General Election 2005: Isle of Wight [31]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Andrew Turner 32,717 48.9 +9.2
Liberal Democrat Anthony Rowlands 19,739 29.5 −5.8
Labour Mark Chiverton 11,484 17.2 +2.0
UKIP Michael Tarrant 2,352 3.5 +0.2
Independent Edward Corby 551 0.8 N/A
Majority 12,978 19.4 -4.4
Turnout 66,843 61.3 +0.5
Registered electors 107,737
Conservative hold Swing +7.5
General Election 2001: Isle of Wight [11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Andrew Turner 25,223 39.7 +5.7
Liberal Democrat Peter Brand 22,397 35.3 −7.5
Labour Deborah Gardiner 9,676 15.2 +2.1
UKIP David Lott 2,106 3.3 +1.9
Independent David Holmes 1,423 2.2 N/A
Green Paul Scivier 1,279 2.0 +1.3
Isle of Wight Party Philip Murray 1,164 1.8 N/A
Socialist Labour James Spensley 214 0.3 N/A
Majority 2,826 4.4 N/A
Turnout 63,482 60.8 −11.2
Registered electors 104,431
Conservative gain from Liberal Democrat Swing -6.6

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General Election 1997: Isle of Wight[11][32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Democrat Peter Brand 31,274 42.7 −2.9
Conservative Andrew Turner 24,868 34.0 −13.9
Labour Deborah Gardiner 9,646 13.2 +7.2
Referendum Tim Bristow 4,734 6.5 N/A
UKIP Malcom Turner 1,072 1.5 N/A
Independent Harry Rees 848 1.2 N/A
Green Paul Scivier 544 0.7 N/A
Natural Law Clive Daly 87 0.1 −0.3
Rainbow Warriors Jonathan Eveleigh 86 0.1 N/A
Majority 6,406 8.6 N/A
Turnout 74,193 72.0 −7.8
Registered electors 101,680
Liberal Democrat gain from Conservative Swing +8.4
General Election 1992: Isle of Wight [10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Barry Field 38,163 47.9 −3.3
Liberal Democrat Peter Brand 36,336 45.6 +2.7
Labour Ken Pearson 4,784 6.0 +0.1
Natural Law Clive Daly 350 0.4 N/A
Majority 1,827 2.3 −6.0
Turnout 79,633 79.8 +0.2
Registered electors 99,839
Conservative hold Swing −3.0

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General Election 1987: Isle of Wight [10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Barry Field 40,175 51.2 +4.9
Liberal Michael Young 33,733 42.9 −8.1
Labour Kenn Pearson 4,626 5.9 +3.5
Majority 6,442 8.3 N/A
Turnout 78,560 79.6 -0.4
Registered electors 98,694
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing
General Election 1983: Isle of Wight [10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Stephen Ross 38,407 51.0 +2.8
Conservative Virginia Bottomley 34,904 46.3 -1.4
Labour Catherine Wilson 1,828 2.4 -1.6
Isle of Wight Residents Party Thomas McDermott 208 0.3 N/A
Majority 3,503 4.7 +4.2
Turnout 75,347 80.0 -1.8
Registered electors 94,226
Liberal hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General Election 1979: Isle of Wight[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Stephen Ross 35,889 48.2 +3.1
Conservative Dudley Fishburn 35,537 47.7 +5.7
Labour C Wilson 3,014 4.0 -9
Majority 352 0.5 -2.6
Turnout 74,440 81.8 +5.1
Registered electors 90,961
Liberal hold Swing
General Election October 1974: Isle of Wight[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Stephen Ross 29,697 45.1 -5.1
Conservative Dudley Fishburn 27,657 42.0 +3.0
Labour L.D. Brooke 8,562 13.0 +2.2
Majority 2,040 3.1 -8.1
Turnout 65,916 76.7 -4.7
Registered electors 85,897
Liberal hold Swing
General Election February 1974: Isle of Wight[33]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Stephen Ross 34,808 50.2 +28.0
Conservative Mark Woodnutt 27,042 39.0 -13.4
Labour TC Bisson 7,495 10.8 -11.8
Majority 7,766 11.2 N/A
Turnout 69,345 81.4 +9.4
Registered electors 85,208
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing
General Election 1970: Isle of Wight[34]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Mark Woodnutt 30,437 52.4 +3.8
Labour Kent Boulton 13,111 22.6 -6.4
Liberal Stephen Ross 12,883 22.2 -0.2
Vectis National Party Ronald W.J Cowdell 1,607 2.8 N/A
Majority 17,326 29.8 +10.2
Turnout 58,038 72.0 -3.0
Registered electors 80,537
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

General Election 1966: Isle of Wight[35]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Mark Woodnutt 25,862 48.6 -4.9
Labour Peter Stephenson 15,411 29.0 -2.6
Liberal Stephen Ross 11,915 22.4 +7.5
Majority 10,451 19.6 -2.3
Turnout 53,188 75.0 +0.7
Registered electors 70,877
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1964: Isle of Wight[36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Mark Woodnutt 27,497 53.5 -9.4
Labour William Mann 16,244 31.6 -5.5
Liberal Barbara Bliss 7,666 14.9 N/A
Majority 11,253 21.9 -4.0
Turnout 51,407 74.3 +0.2
Registered electors 69,215
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

General Election 1959: Isle of Wight[37]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Mark Woodnutt 31,228 62.9 +0.3
Labour Edward Cecil Amey 18,396 37.1 -0.3
Majority 12,832 25.9 +0.6
Turnout 49,624 74.1 -0.3
Registered electors 66,939
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1955: Isle of Wight[38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Macdonald 31,335 62.6 +0.8
Labour Sydney Conbeer 18,698 37.4 -0.8
Majority 12,637 25.3 +1.7
Turnout 50,033 74.4 -5.9
Registered electors 67,297
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1951: Isle of Wight[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Macdonald 33,501 61.8 +1.3
Labour Sydney Conbeer 20,712 38.2 -1.3
Majority 12,789 23.6 +2.5
Turnout 54,213 80.3 -0.3
Registered electors 67,501
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1950: Isle of Wight[40]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Macdonald 32,984 60.5 +13.9
Labour Sydney Conbeer 21,496 39.5 -1.2
Majority 11,488 21.1 +15.2
Turnout 54,480 80.6 +4.6
Registered electors 67,581
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1940s[edit]

General Election 1945: Isle of Wight[41]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Macdonald 22,036 46.6 -16.58
Labour William Miller 19,252 40.7 +3.87
Liberal May O'Conor 5,967 12.6 +12.6
Majority 2,784 5.9 -20.47
Turnout 47,255 76.0 +6.56
Registered electors 62,364
Conservative hold Swing

General Election 1939/40

Another general election was required to take place before the end of 1940. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place from 1939 and by the end of this year, the following candidates had been selected;

Elections in the 1930s[edit]

General Election 1935: Isle of Wight[42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Macdonald 26,748 63.18 -14.07
Labour William Miller 15,586 36.83 +14.07
Majority 11,162 26.37 -28.13
Turnout 42,334 69.44 -1.68
Registered electors 60,965
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1931: Isle of Wight
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Macdonald 32,728 77.25 +29.05
Labour James Drummond 9,639 22.75 +9.05
Majority 23,089 54.50 +44.50
Turnout 42,367 71.12 -7.88
Registered electors 59,574
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1920s[edit]

General Election 1929: Isle of Wight[43]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist Peter Macdonald 21,949 48.2 -4.2
Liberal St John Hutchinson 17,383 38.1 +0.3
Labour Henry Edward Weaver 6,256 13.7 +3.9
Majority 4,566 10.1 -4.5
Turnout 45,588 79.0 -1.1
Registered electors 57,693
Unionist hold Swing -2.3
General Election 1924: Isle of Wight
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist Peter Macdonald 19,346 52.4 +6.1
Liberal John Seely 13,944 37.8 -8.8
Labour Henry Edward Weaver 3,620 9.8 +2.7
Majority 5,402 14.6 N/A
Turnout 36,910 80.1 +4.5
Registered electors 46,052
Unionist gain from Liberal Swing +7.5
General Election 1923: Isle of Wight
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal John Seely 16,249 46.6 +10.4
Unionist Peter Macdonald 16,159 46.3 +14.7
Labour Emily Palmer 2,475 7.1 -4.1
Majority 90 0.3 -4.3
Turnout 34,883 76.6 +1.2
Registered electors 45,530
Liberal hold Swing -2.2
General Election 1922: Isle of Wight
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Edgar Chatfeild-Clarke 12,202 36.2 -4.6
Unionist John Perowne 10,620 31.6 -27.6
Independent Unionist Arthur Veasey 7,061 21.0 N/A
Labour Harold Shearman 3,756 11.2 N/A
Majority 1,582 4.6 N/A
Turnout 33,639 75.4 +9.9
Registered electors 44,637
Liberal gain from Unionist Swing +11.5

Elections in the 1910s[edit]

General Election 1918: Isle of Wight
Party Candidate Votes % ±
C Unionist Douglas Hall 16,274 59.2 +8.4
Liberal Godfrey Baring 11,235 40.8 -8.4
Majority 5,039 18.4 +16.8
Turnout 27,509 65.5 -23.2
Registered electors 42,013
Unionist hold Swing +8.4
C indicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

Scaramanga-Ralli
General Election December 1910: Isle of Wight [44]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Douglas Hall 7,192 50.8 -0.2
Liberal Constantine Scaramanga-Ralli 6,969 49.2 +0.2
Turnout 14,161 88.7 -2.3
Majority 223 1.6 -0.4
Registered electors 15,969
Conservative hold Swing -0.2
General Election January 1910:Isle of Wight [45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Douglas Hall 7,414 51.0 +6.8
Liberal Godfrey Baring 7,123 49.0 -6.8
Majority 291 2.0 N/A
Turnout 14,537 91.0 -3.2
Registered electors 15,969
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +6.8

Elections in the 1900s[edit]

Baring
General Election 1906: Isle of Wight[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Godfrey Baring 7,453 55.8 N/A
Conservative Anthony Hickman Morgan 5,892 44.2 N/A
Majority 1,561 11.6 N/A
Turnout 13,345 87.8 N/A
Registered electors 15,193
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing N/A
Seely
Isle of Wight by-election, 1904[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Ind. Conservative John Seely Unopposed
Registered electors
Ind. Conservative gain from Conservative
General Election 1900: Isle of Wight[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Seely Unopposed
Registered electors 14,494
Conservative hold
Isle of Wight by-election, 1900[46][45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Seely 6,432 54.5 +2.5
Liberal Godfrey Baring 5,370 45.5 -2.5
Majority 1,062 9.0 +5.0
Turnout 11,802 81.4 +0.5
Registered electors 14,494
Conservative hold Swing +2.5

Elections in the 1890s[edit]

General Election 1895: Isle of Wight[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Webster 5,809 52.0 -0.1
Liberal Armine Wodehouse 5,363 48.0 +0.1
Majority 446 4.0 -0.2
Turnout 11,172 80.9 -3.5
Registered electors 13,816
Conservative hold Swing -0.1
General Election 1892: Isle of Wight[45]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Webster 5,699 52.1 -4.7
Liberal Sigismund Mendl 5,238 47.9 +4.7
Majority 461 4.2 -9.4
Turnout 10,937 84.4 +6.7
Registered electors 12,957
Conservative hold Swing -4.7

Elections in the 1880s[edit]

Isle of Wight by-election, 1886[47]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Webster Unopposed
Registered electors 11,943
Conservative hold
General Election 1886: Isle of Wight[47]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Webster 5,271 56.8 +4.7
Liberal John Stuart[48] 4,013 43.2 -4.7
Majority 1,258 13.6 +9.4
Turnout 9,284 77.7 -10.7
Registered electors 11,943
Conservative hold Swing +4.7
General Election 1885: Isle of Wight[47]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Richard Webster 5,495 52.1 +2.3
Liberal Evelyn Ashley 5,059 47.9 -2.3
Majority 436 4.2 N/A
Turnout 10,554 88.4 +8.5
Registered electors 11,943
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +2.3
General Election 1880: Isle of Wight[49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Evelyn Ashley 1,986 50.2 +0.3
Conservative Benjamin Temple Cotton[50] 1,973 49.8 -0.3
Majority 13 0.3 N/A
Turnout 3,959 79.9 +1.1
Registered electors 4,954
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +0.3

Elections in the 1870s[edit]

General Election 1874: Isle of Wight[49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Alexander Baillie-Cochrane 1,614 50.1 +4.9
Liberal Evelyn Ashley 1,605 49.9 -4.9
Majority 9 0.3 N/A
Turnout 3,219 78.8 +13.9
Registered electors 4,084
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +4.9
Isle of Wight by-election, 1870[49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Alexander Baillie-Cochrane 1,317 50.7 +5.5
Liberal George Moffatt[51] 1,282 49.3 -5.5
Majority 35 1.3 N/A
Turnout 2,599 68.3 +3.4
Registered electors 3,807
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +5.5
  • Caused by Simeon's death.

Elections in the 1860s[edit]

General Election 1868: Isle of Wight[49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal John Simeon 1,353 54.8 +2.3
Conservative Alexander Baillie-Cochrane 1,118 45.2 -2.3
Majority 235 9.5 +4.4
Turnout 2,471 64.9 +0.3
Registered electors 3,807
Liberal hold Swing +2.3
General Election 1865: Isle of Wight[49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal John Simeon 786 52.5 +0.4
Conservative Charles Locock 710 47.5 −0.4
Majority 76 5.1 +0.8
Turnout 1,496 64.6 −6.5
Registered electors 2,315
Liberal hold Swing +0.4

Elections in the 1850s[edit]

General Election 1859: Isle of Wight[49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Charles Clifford 756 52.1 −2.4
Conservative Francis Venables-Vernon-Harcourt 694 47.9 +2.4
Majority 62 4.3 −4.7
Turnout 1,450 71.1 +2.3
Registered electors 2,038
Liberal hold Swing −2.4
General Election 1857: Isle of Wight[49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Charles Clifford 730 54.5 +8.0
Conservative Thomas Willis Fleming 610 45.5 −8.0
Majority 120 9.0 N/A
Turnout 1,340 68.8 −8.4
Registered electors 1,949
Whig gain from Conservative Swing +8.0
General Election 1852: Isle of Wight[49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Francis Venables-Vernon-Harcourt 681 53.5
Radical Edward Dawes 593 46.5
Majority 88 6.9
Turnout 1,274 77.2
Registered electors 1,650
Conservative gain from Whig Swing
By-election, 29 May 1851: Isle of Wight[49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical Edward Dawes 565 52.1
Conservative Andrew Snape Hamond[52] 519 47.9
Majority 46 4.2
Turnout 1,084 65.7
Registered electors 1,650
Radical gain from Whig Swing

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years
References
  1. ^ "Parliamentary Electors by Parliamentary Constituencies 2010–2015". Office for National Statistics. 24 February 2016. Retrieved 17 February 2017.
  2. ^ "Wight". Oxford Dictionaries. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  3. ^ a b "Electorate Figures – Boundary Commission for England". Archived from the original on 6 November 2010.
  4. ^ "The Bow Group "Crossbow" – 50th Anniversary edition (page 41)" (PDF). www.bowgroup.org. Retrieved 27 October 2008.[dead link]
  5. ^ "Boundary Commission for England – Isle of Wight". www.statistics.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 4 July 2008. Retrieved 26 October 2008.
  6. ^ "Isle of Wight 'two constituencies' by 2020 says MP". BBC News. Retrieved 29 April 2017.
  7. ^ Initial Proposal South East Boundary Commission for England
  8. ^ a b "UK General Election results – October 1974". www.politicsresources.net. Retrieved 27 October 2008.
  9. ^ a b "UK General Election results – May 1979". www.politicsresources.net. Retrieved 27 October 2008.
  10. ^ a b c d e "British Parliamentary Election Results 1983–1997". www.election.demon.co.uk. Retrieved 26 October 2008.
  11. ^ a b c d "BBC News – Results and Constituencies – Isle of Wight". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 27 October 2008.
  12. ^ http://www.iwcp.co.uk/news/Isle-of-Wight-Lib-Dems-put-forward-youngest-candidate-on-Island-314870.aspx
  13. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "I"
  14. ^ "Illustrated London News". 31 July 1847. p. 7. Retrieved 4 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).
  15. ^ "General Election". London Evening Standard. 7 August 1847. p. 3. Retrieved 4 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).
  16. ^ "Bell's Weekly Messenger". 16 August 1847. p. 2. Retrieved 4 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).
  17. ^ "Hampshire Advertiser". 24 May 1851. p. 5. Retrieved 4 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).
  18. ^ "Isle of Wight Election". Berkshire Chronicle. 24 July 1852. p. 8. Retrieved 4 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).
  19. ^ "Election Matters". Lancaster Gazette. 24 July 1852. p. 8. Retrieved 4 August 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).
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