List of massacres in the Czech Republic

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The following lists include the incidents that have occurred in the territory of the present-day Czech Republic in which the killing of more than five non-combatant people (unarmmed civilians, prisoners or prisoners of war) took place.

Massacres before World War II[edit]

The following is a list of massacres that have occurred in the territory of the present-day Czech Republic before World War II:

Name Date Location Deaths Notes
Massacre in Běchovice June 17, 1848 Prague 7 (at least) at least 50 injured; part of 1848's revolution
Massacre in Kadaň (Massaker von Kaaden) 4 March 1919 Kadaň 17 complete toll 25 (including those of about 70 injured who later died); part of 4 March's general strike in German provinces
Massacre in Šternberk (Massaker von Sternberg) 4 March 1919 Šternberk 15 part of 4 March's general strike in German provinces
Frývaldov strike (Freiwaldau strike) 25 November 1931 Dolní Lipová 8 at least 13 injured; part of Great Depression strike movement

Massacres during World War II[edit]

The following is a list of massacres that have occurred in the territory of the present-day Czech Republic in the time of Nazi occupation, World War II and in 1945. The only exception is the biggest single-day mass murder of Czech citizens in history which was committed in Auschwitz (today in Poland) in March 1944. If not stated otherwise, the victims were of Czech ethnicity.

Name Date Location Deaths Notes
17 November Raid against universities and colleges 17 November 1939 Praha 9 nine student leaders were executed, about 1500 students sent to concentration camps where 35 were executed or died later); part of German occupation
First Martial Law (First Heydrichiada) 28 September 1941 - 19 January 1942 Praha 247 complete toll about 1500 (including those executed and other deaths in concentration camps); victims of various ethnicity, mostly Czechs and Czech Jews; part of German occupation
First Martial Law (First Heydrichiada) 28 September 1941 - 19 November 1941 Brno 239 complete toll about 1000 (including those executed and other deaths in concentration camps); victims of various ethnicity, mostly Czechs and Czech Jews; part of German occupation
Massacre in Lidice 10 June 1942 Lidice 173 complete toll 340 (including deaths in concentration camps); part of German occupation
Massacre in Ležáky 24 June 1942 Ležáky 33 complete toll 44 (including deaths in concentration camps); part of German occupation
Liquidation of the Family Camp 8–9 March 1944 Auschwitz-Birkenau 3,792 the victims were Czech Jews; although committed outside the territory of Czech Republic, this was the biggest mass murder of Czech citizens in history; part of Holocaust
Massacre in Životice 6 August 1944 Životice 36 complete toll 44 (including deaths in concentration camps), mostly ethnic Poles and Czechs; part of German occupation
Transport of death 24 January 1945 Brandýs nad Orlicí 18 victims of various ethnicity; part of the Death marches[1]
Transport of death 13–14 April 1945 Stod (Czech Republic) 241 victims of various ethnicity; part of the Death marches
Massacre in Jablunkov 13 April 1945 Jablunkov 12 Polish prisoners murdered by gestapo; part of German occupation
Transport of death 15 April 1945 Nýřany about 100 victims of various ethnicity; part of the Death marches
Murder in Gästehaus 17 April 1945 Kyjov 7 complete toll 9 (including two men subsequently shot on street); part of German occupation[2]
Massacre in Ploština 19 April 1945 Ploština 24 complete toll 28 (including subsequent executions); part of German occupation
Massacre in Zákřov 20 April 1945 Zákřov 19 part of German occupation
Killing in clay pit 20(?) April 1945 Mikulov 21 mass murder of Hungarian Jewish prisoners working in clay pit; part of Holocaust
Court-martial in Medlánky 21 April 1945 Brno-Medlánky 15 part of German occupation
Massacre in Prlov 23 April 1945 Prlov 19 complete toll 23 (including subsequent executions); part of German occupation
Massacre near Salaš 29 April 1945 Bunč 21 part of German occupation
Massacre near Suchý 30 April 1945 Suchý 10 part of German occupation
Massacre in Letovice May (?) 1945 Letovice 19 the bodies of murdered gestapo prisoners were discovered on 15. May; part of German occupation
Last execution in Theresienstadt 2 May 1945 Theresienstadt 52 at the request of K.H.Frank the "most dangerous" political prisoners were murdered; most of the victims were Czech communists; part of German occupation
Execution in Lazce 2 May 1945 Olomouc-Lazce 23 21 participants or hostages captured during the uprising in Přerov and 2 local members of the resistance; part of German occupation
Execution in Fort XIII 2 May 1945 Olomouc-Nová ulice 17 captured participants of the uprising in Přerov and hostages; part of German occupation
Transport of death May 3–6, 1945 Olbramovice 82 victims of various ethnicity; part of the Death marches
Death march May 4–6, 1945 Podbořany-Kaštice 268 complete toll cca 600 (including those killed or died on the way from Johanngeorgenstadt to Lovosice); victims of various ethnicity; part of the Death marches
Massacre in Javoříčko 5 May 1945 Javoříčko 38 part of German occupation
Brandýs Tragedy 5 May 1945 Brandýs nad Orlicí 15 part of German occupation[3]
Death march 6 May 1945 Volary 95 complete toll cca 1000 (including those killed or died on the way from Helmbrecht to Volary); victims of various ethnicity, mostly Hungarian Jews; part of the Death marches
Massacre in Velké Meziříčí 6 May 1945 Velké Meziříčí 58 complete toll 60 (including subsequent executions); part of German occupation
Massacre in Leskovice 6 May 1945 Leskovice 18 complete toll 26 (including 8 insurgents executed or killed in fight previous day); the SS-commander responsible for the massacre of civilians was Walter Hauck; part of German occupation[4]
Massacre in Prague, Úsobská street 6 May 1945 Prague 51 part of Prague uprising
Massacre in Psáry 6 May 1945 Psáry 13 part of Prague uprising
Kolín massacre 7 May 1945 Kolín 16 part of German occupation
Massacre in Třešť 7 May 1945 Třešť 34 part of German occupation
Massacre in Velké Popovice 7 May 1945 Velké Popovice 29 part of German occupation
Massacre in Lahovice 7 May 1945 Prague-Lahovice 21 part of Prague uprising
Massacre in Masarykovo nádraží 8 May 1945 Prague 53 part of Prague uprising
Massacre in Trhová Kamenice 8 May 1945 Trhová Kamenice 13 part of German occupation
Malín tragedy 8 May 1945 Kutná Hora-Malín 11 part of German occupation
Massacre of Germans in Bořislavka 9 May 1945 Prague-Bořislavka 41 part of Prague uprising, unlike previous massacres in Prague, this time the victims were Germans
Burning of Lejčkov 9 May 1945 Dolní Hořice-Lejčkov 24 part of German occupation; this massacre was committed by German troops after the German surrender[5]
Massacre in Běloves 9 May 1945 Náchod 9 part of German occupation; this massacre was committed by Waffen-SS whole day after the German surrender came into force
Massacre in Lanškroun May 17–21, 1945 Lanškroun at least 51 the victims were Germans; part of the expulsion of Germans
Massacre in Německý Šicndorf 19 May 1945 Dobronín 12-15 the victims were Germans; part of the expulsion of Germans
Massacre in Postoloprty 25 May – 7 June 1945 Postoloprty at least 730 the victims were Germans; part of the expulsion of Germans; in 1947 in total 763 bodies were found in Postoloprty, but some of the mass graves were attributed to the Death march from the end of the war
Massacre in Podbořany 7 June 1945 Podbořany 68 the victims were Germans; part of the expulsion of Germans
Massacre in Švédské Šance June 18–19, 1945 Přerov 265 mostly ethnic Germans and Slovaks; part of the expulsion of Germans
Tragedy at Buková hora 30 June 1945 Teplice nad Metují 23 the victims were Germans; part of the expulsion of Germans; women, children and old men were marched to the border to be expelled; as Polish authorities refused entry, the Germans were killed[6]
Ústí massacre 31 July 1945 Ústí nad Labem 43 - 8000 the victims were Germans; part of the expulsion of Germans; the official Czechoslovak investigation confirmed 43 killed people, but the real number is estimated at least 100; the Sudeten German organisations are traditionally claimig "thousands" of victims[7]

Massacres after World War II[edit]

The following is a list of massacres that have occurred in the territory of the present-day Czech Republic after 1945:

Name Date Location Deaths Notes
Jeseník tragedy 27 February 1967 Jeseník 8 mentally ill Josef Svoboda killed with an ax his whole family and then committed suicide[8]
Fight for radio station 21 August 1968 Praha-Vinohrady 9 (16) during the attempt of unarmed demonstrators to defend the radio building against Soviet invadors 4 men were shot dead and 5 men were killed by Soviet military truck; the same day at the same place 4 men died due to the explosion of the Soviet tank (which was set ablaze by demonstrators) and other 3 people died after the fire spread to surrounding buildings; in other parts of Prague, 2 people were shot dead and 2 people were killed by Soviet tanks;[9] part of Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia
Occupation of Liberec 21 August 1968 Liberec 9 in the early hours of Soviet invasion 4 people were shot dead in the main square and 24 injured (2 of them died later); few hours later one Soviet tank struck the building at the square causing the immediate death of 2 people and injured 9 (1 died later);[9][10] part of Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia
Truck attack at the tram stop 10 July 1973 Praha 8 truck-murderer Olga Hepnarová killed 3 people immediately and injured 17 (5 died later).[11]
Uherský Brod shooting 24 February 2015 Uherský Brod 9 mentally ill Zdeněk Kovář shot the guests in restaurant and then committed suicide[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "SPOLEČNÝ HROB VĚZŇŮ Z TRANSPORTU Z OSVĚTIMI". Římskokatolická farnost Brandýs nad Orlicí. Společenství farníků farnost Brandýs nad Orlicí. Retrieved 1 April 2016. 
  2. ^ Dunděra, Jiří (7 May 2010). "Poslední dny války na Kyjovsku" (PDF). Kyjovské noviny. 5: p. 4. Retrieved 1 April 2016. 
  3. ^ Hubený, Jaroslav (1 May 2015). "Padni komu padni. Tak píše příběhy roku 1945 Jiří Padevět". iDNES.cz. Retrieved 1 April 2016. 
  4. ^ "Válka končila, na Pelhřimovsku se ale schylovalo k masakrům". Česká televize (in Czech). ČT24. 3 May 2015. Retrieved 21 April 2017. 
  5. ^ "Památník Lejčkov [Lejckov Memorial]". Táborský klub. Klub českého pohraničí Táborsko. Retrieved 8 May 2016. 
  6. ^ Ježek, Jan. "Na Bukové hoře". Krajinou a přírodou východních Čech. Retrieved 13 March 2016. 
  7. ^ "Výbuch muničního skladiště v Krásném Březně a masakr německého obyvatelstva 31. července 1945". Dějiny města Ústí nad Labem. Statutární město Ústí nad Labem oficiální stránky / úřední. Retrieved 17 September 2016. 
  8. ^ Krňávek, Petr (11 July 2013). "Jesenická tragédie: sedm mrtvých rukou jediného vraha". deník.cz. Retrieved 1 February 2016. 
  9. ^ a b "Chronologie událostí 20. a 21. srpna 1968". The Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes. Retrieved 17 September 2016. 
  10. ^ Mikulička, Jan (21 August 2015). "Sovětští vojáci zabili v roce 1968 devět Liberečanů, nejvíc po Praze". iDnes.cz. Retrieved 17 September 2016. 
  11. ^ "OLGA HEPNAROVÁ - TRAGÉDIE NA ZASTÁVCE". Policie-CR.cz. Retrieved 1 February 2016. 
  12. ^ "Czech shooting: Gunman kills eight in Uhersky Brod". BBC. 24 February 2015. Retrieved 8 February 2016. 

See also[edit]