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Solar eclipse of July 10, 1972

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Solar eclipse of July 10, 1972
Map
Type of eclipse
NatureTotal
Gamma0.6872
Magnitude1.0379
Maximum eclipse
Duration156 s (2 min 36 s)
Coordinates63°30′N 94°12′W / 63.5°N 94.2°W / 63.5; -94.2
Max. width of band175 km (109 mi)
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse19:46:38
References
Saros126 (45 of 72)
Catalog # (SE5000)9448

A total solar eclipse occurred at the Moon's descending node of orbit on Monday, July 10, 1972, with a magnitude of 1.0379. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is larger than the Sun's, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across Earth's surface, with the partial solar eclipse visible over a surrounding region thousands of kilometres wide. Occurring only 2.9 days after perigee (on July 7, 1972), the Moon's diameter was relatively large.

It was visible as a total eclipse along a path of totality that began in Sea of Okhotsk and traversed the far eastern portions of the Soviet Union (which now belongs to Russia) on July 11 local time, northern Alaska in the United States, Northern Canada, eastern Quebec and the Canadian Maritimes on July 10 local time. A partial eclipse was visible over Siberia, Canada and the northern and eastern United States.

The eclipse was mostly seen on July 10, 1972, except for the Asian part of Soviet Union and Japanese island Hokkaido, where either a partial or a total eclipse was seen on July 11 local time, and part of the Soviet Union along the coast of Kara Sea, where a partial eclipse started on July 10, passing midnight and ended on July 11 due to the midnight sun.

Observations

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A team of the Academy of Sciences of the Soviet Union observed the total solar eclipse in Russkaya Koshka, Magadan Oblast (now separated into Chukotka Autonomous Okrug) on the coast of Gulf of Anadyr. The weather condition was clear, and the team successfully took images of the corona and made polarization observations to study its structure and physical characteristics.[1] In Nova Scotia, Canada, the eclipse was clouded out and could not be observed. Besides that, 850 passengers boarded a cruise ship from New York City and saw a total eclipse successfully in North Atlantic Ocean. Many scientists also boarded the ship and did research, and some also gave classes in meteorology, oceanography, etc., which almost all passengers attended.[2][3]

"You're So Vain"

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The eclipse is referenced in the lyrics of Carly Simon's 1972 hit song "You're So Vain." The subject of the song, after witnessing his racehorse win "naturally" at the Saratoga Race Course, flies his Learjet to Nova Scotia to see the eclipse; Simon uses the two phenomena as examples of how the subject seems to be "where (he) should be all the time." Simon released the song four months after the eclipse.[4]

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Eclipses in 1972

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Metonic

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Tzolkinex

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Half-Saros

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Tritos

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Solar Saros 126

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Inex

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Triad

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Solar eclipses of 1971–1974

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This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[5]

The partial solar eclipses on February 25, 1971 and August 20, 1971 occur in the previous lunar year eclipse set.

Solar eclipse series sets from 1971 to 1974
Descending node   Ascending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
116 July 22, 1971

Partial
1.513 121 January 16, 1972

Annular
−0.9365
126 July 10, 1972

Total
0.6872 131 January 4, 1973

Annular
−0.2644
136 June 30, 1973

Total
−0.0785 141 December 24, 1973

Annular
0.4171
146 June 20, 1974

Total
−0.8239 151 December 13, 1974

Partial
1.0797

Saros 126

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This eclipse is a part of Saros series 126, repeating every 18 years, 11 days, and containing 72 events. The series started with a partial solar eclipse on March 10, 1179. It contains annular eclipses from June 4, 1323 through April 4, 1810; hybrid eclipses from April 14, 1828 through May 6, 1864; and total eclipses from May 17, 1882 through August 23, 2044. The series ends at member 72 as a partial eclipse on May 3, 2459. Its eclipses are tabulated in three columns; every third eclipse in the same column is one exeligmos apart, so they all cast shadows over approximately the same parts of the Earth.

The longest duration of annularity was produced by member 11 at 6 minutes, 30 seconds on June 26, 1359, and the longest duration of totality was produced by member 45 at 2 minutes, 36 seconds on July 10, 1972. All eclipses in this series occur at the Moon’s descending node of orbit.[6]

Series members 36–57 occur between 1801 and 2200:
36 37 38

April 4, 1810

April 14, 1828

April 25, 1846
39 40 41

May 6, 1864

May 17, 1882

May 28, 1900
42 43 44

June 8, 1918

June 19, 1936

June 30, 1954
45 46 47

July 10, 1972

July 22, 1990

August 1, 2008
48 49 50

August 12, 2026

August 23, 2044

September 3, 2062
51 52 53

September 13, 2080

September 25, 2098

October 6, 2116
54 55 56

October 17, 2134

October 28, 2152

November 8, 2170
57

November 18, 2188

Tritos series

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This eclipse is a part of a tritos cycle, repeating at alternating nodes every 135 synodic months (≈ 3986.63 days, or 11 years minus 1 month). Their appearance and longitude are irregular due to a lack of synchronization with the anomalistic month (period of perigee), but groupings of 3 tritos cycles (≈ 33 years minus 3 months) come close (≈ 434.044 anomalistic months), so eclipses are similar in these groupings.

Series members between 1801 and 2200

October 19, 1808
(Saros 111)

September 19, 1819
(Saros 112)

August 18, 1830
(Saros 113)

July 18, 1841
(Saros 114)

June 17, 1852
(Saros 115)

May 17, 1863
(Saros 116)

April 16, 1874
(Saros 117)

March 16, 1885
(Saros 118)

February 13, 1896
(Saros 119)

January 14, 1907
(Saros 120)

December 14, 1917
(Saros 121)

November 12, 1928
(Saros 122)

October 12, 1939
(Saros 123)

September 12, 1950
(Saros 124)

August 11, 1961
(Saros 125)

July 10, 1972
(Saros 126)

June 11, 1983
(Saros 127)

May 10, 1994
(Saros 128)

April 8, 2005
(Saros 129)

March 9, 2016
(Saros 130)

February 6, 2027
(Saros 131)

January 5, 2038
(Saros 132)

December 5, 2048
(Saros 133)

November 5, 2059
(Saros 134)

October 4, 2070
(Saros 135)

September 3, 2081
(Saros 136)

August 3, 2092
(Saros 137)

July 4, 2103
(Saros 138)

June 3, 2114
(Saros 139)

May 3, 2125
(Saros 140)

April 1, 2136
(Saros 141)

March 2, 2147
(Saros 142)

January 30, 2158
(Saros 143)

December 29, 2168
(Saros 144)

November 28, 2179
(Saros 145)

October 29, 2190
(Saros 146)

Metonic series

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The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's descending node.

21 eclipse events between July 11, 1953 and July 11, 2029
July 10–11 April 29–30 February 15–16 December 4 September 21–23
116 118 120 122 124

July 11, 1953

April 30, 1957

February 15, 1961

December 4, 1964

September 22, 1968
126 128 130 132 134

July 10, 1972

April 29, 1976

February 16, 1980

December 4, 1983

September 23, 1987
136 138 140 142 144

July 11, 1991

April 29, 1995

February 16, 1999

December 4, 2002

September 22, 2006
146 148 150 152 154

July 11, 2010

April 29, 2014

February 15, 2018

December 4, 2021

September 21, 2025
156

July 11, 2029

Notes

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  1. ^ "ЗАТМЕНИЕ 30 ИЮНЯ 1972 г." (in Russian). IZMIRAN. Archived from the original on 22 June 2020.
  2. ^ "Voyage to Darkness". Pedas Family. Archived from the original on 4 April 2016.
  3. ^ Philip G. Schrag (30 July 1972). "For Two Extremely Short Minutes Everyone Gaped Into the Sky". New York Times. Archived from the original on 4 April 2016.
  4. ^ "YOU'RE SO VAIN: THE TRUTH BEHIND CARLY SIMON'S MYSTERIOUS BREAKUP SONG". This Is Dig!. Warner Music Group. 2022-11-08. Retrieved 11 April 2024.
  5. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.
  6. ^ "NASA - Catalog of Solar Eclipses of Saros 126". eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov.

References

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