Solar eclipse of December 26, 2019

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Solar eclipse of December 26, 2019
Annular Solar Eclipse in Jaffna - 26 December 2019 (1).jpg
Annularity as seen from Jaffna, Sri Lanka
SE2019Dec26A.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NatureAnnular
Gamma0.4135
Magnitude0.9701
Maximum eclipse
Duration220 sec (3 m 40 s)
Coordinates1°00′N 102°18′E / 1°N 102.3°E / 1; 102.3
Max. width of band118 km (73 mi)
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse5:18:53
References
Saros132 (46 of 71)
Catalog # (SE5000)9552

An annular solar eclipse occurred on December 26, 2019. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide.[1]

The annularity was visible in Saudi Arabia, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, Northern Mariana Islands, and Guam.

Details[edit]

Eclipse Magnitude 0.97010
Eclipse Obscuration 0.94110
Gamma 0.41351
Saros series 132 (46 of 71)
Greatest Eclipse 26 Dec 2019 05:17:43.6 UTC
Ecliptic Conjunction 26 Dec 2019 05:13:07.5 UTC
Equatorial Conjunction 26 Dec 2019 05:14:34.3 UTC
Coordinate Sun Moon
Right Ascension 18.3 18.3
Declination -23.4 -23
Diameter (arcseconds) 1951.4 1866.0
Contact Event Time UTC
First Penumbral External Contact 02:29:51.3
First Umbral External Contact 03:34:32.2
First Central Line 03:36:04.1
First Umbral Internal Contact 03:37:36.3
First Penumbral Internal Contact 05:01:26.1
Greatest Eclipse 05:17:43.6
Last Penumbral Internal Contact 05:34:04.7
Last Umbral Internal Contact 06:57:50.7
Last Central Line 06:59:25.9
Last Umbral External Contact 07:01:00.9
Last Penumbral External Contact 08:05:43.9

Visibility and viewing[edit]

Animated path

It was the last solar eclipse of 2019. The central path of the 2019 annular eclipse passed through Saudi Arabian Peninsula, southern India, Sumatra, Borneo, Philippines and Guam. A partial eclipse was visible thousands of kilometers wide from the central path. It covered small parts of Eastern Europe, much of Asia, North/West Australia, East in Africa, Pacific and Indian Ocean.[1][2] The eclipse started with an antumbra having a magnitude of .96; it stretched 164 kilometers wide, and traveled towards the east at an average rate of 1.1 kilometer per second. The longest duration of annularity was 3 minutes and 40 seconds, at 5.30 UT1 occurring in the South China Sea (0°45'54.0"N 105°29'06.0"E).[1]

Map showing the visibility of the Annular Solar Eclipse on December 26, 2019 in India.
Time-lapse video of the eclipse as seen from Kinnigoli, India.

The eclipse began in Saudi Arabia about 220 kilometers northeast of Riyadh at 03:43 UT1 and ended in Guam at 06:59.4 UT1. It reached India near Kannur, Kerala, at 03:56 UT1. The shadow reached the southeast coast of India at 04:04 UT1. Traveling through northern Sri Lanka, it headed into the Bay of Bengal. The next main visible places were Palau (Malaysia), Sumatra and Singapore. It then passed through the South China Sea, crossed Borneo and the Celebes Sea, the Philippines archipelago and then headed towards the western Pacific. The antumbral shadow encountered Guam at 6:56 UT1 and rose back into space.[1]

Gallery[edit]

Related eclipses[edit]

Eclipses of 2019[edit]

Astronomers Without Borders collected eclipse glasses for redistribution to Latin America and Asia for their 2019 eclipses from the Solar eclipse of August 21, 2017.[3]

Tzolkinex[edit]

Half-Saros cycle[edit]

Tritos[edit]

Solar Saros 132[edit]

Inex[edit]

Triad[edit]

Solar eclipses 2018–2021[edit]

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[4]

Note: Partial solar eclipses on February 15, 2018, and August 11, 2018, occurred during the previous semester series.

Solar eclipse series sets from 2018–2021
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
117
Eclipse (41629136430).jpg
Partial from Melbourne, Australia
2018 July 13
SE2018Jul13P.png
Partial
-1.35423 122
Solar eclipse of January 6, 2019 in Nakhodka, Primorsky Krai.jpg
Partial from Nakhodka, Russia
2019 January 6
SE2019Jan06P.png
Partial
1.14174
127
20190702 Totality LaSerena Chile.jpg
La Serena, Chile
2019 July 2
SE2019Jul02T.png
Total
-0.64656 132
Annular Solar Eclipse in Jaffna - 26 December 2019 (1).jpg
Jaffna, Sri Lanka
2019 December 26
SE2019Dec26A.png
Annular
0.41351
137
Solar eclipse of 21 June 2020 in Beigang, Yunlin, Taiwan.jpg
Beigang, Yunlin, Taiwan
2020 June 21
SE2020Jun21A.png
Annular
0.12090 142
Eclipse total Gorbea 2020.jpg
Gorbea, Chile
2020 December 14
SE2020Dec14T.png
Total
-0.29394
147
Sun - 2021.06.10 Partial Solar Eclipse 2 (51238095123).jpg
Huittinen, Finland
2021 June 10
SE2021Jun10A.png
Annular
0.91516 152 2021 December 4
SE2021Dec04T.png
Total
-0.95261

Saros 132[edit]

This eclipse is a part of Saros cycle 132, repeating every 18 years, 11 days, containing 71 events. The series started with partial solar eclipse on August 13, 1208. It contains annular eclipses from March 17, 1569 through March 12, 2146, hybrid on March 23, 2164 and April 3, 2183 and total eclipses from April 14, 2200 through June 19, 2308. The series ends at member 71 as a partial eclipse on September 25, 2470. The longest duration of annular was 6 minutes, 56 seconds on May 9, 1641, and totality will be 2 minutes, 14 seconds on June 8, 2290. All eclipses in this series occurs at the Moon’s descending node.

Series members 28–50 occur between 1690 and 2100:
28 29 30
SE1695Jun11A.png
June 11, 1695
SE1713Jun22A.png
June 22, 1713
SE1731Jul04A.png
July 4, 1731
31 32 33
SE1749Jul14A.png
July 14, 1749
SE1767Jul25A.png
July 25, 1767
SE1785Aug05A.png
August 5, 1785
34 35 36
SE1803Aug17A.png
August 17, 1803
SE1821Aug27A.png
August 27, 1821
SE1839Sep07A.png
September 7, 1839
37 38 39
SE1857Sep18A.png
September 18, 1857
SE1875Sep29A.png
September 29, 1875
SE1893Oct09A.png
October 9, 1893
40 41 42
SE1911Oct22A.png
October 22, 1911
SE1929Nov01A.png
November 1, 1929
SE1947Nov12A.png
November 12, 1947
43 44 45
SE1965Nov23A.png
November 23, 1965
SE1983Dec04A.png
December 4, 1983
SE2001Dec14A.png
December 14, 2001
46 47 48
SE2019Dec26A.png
December 26, 2019
SE2038Jan05A.png
January 5, 2038
SE2056Jan16A.png
January 16, 2056
49 50
SE2074Jan27A.png
January 27, 2074
SE2092Feb07A.png
February 7, 2092

Metonic series[edit]

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's descending node.[5]

Octon series with 21 events between May 21, 1993 and August 2, 2065
May 20–21 March 8–9 December 25–26 October 13–14 August 1–2
98 100 102 104 106
May 21, 1955 March 9, 1959 December 26, 1962 October 14, 1966 August 2, 1970
108 110 112 114 116
May 21, 1974 March 9, 1978 December 26, 1981 October 14, 1985 August 1, 1989
118 120 122 124 126
SE1993May21P.png
May 21, 1993
SE1997Mar09T.png
March 9, 1997
SE2000Dec25P.png
December 25, 2000
SE2004Oct14P.png
October 14, 2004
SE2008Aug01T.png
August 1, 2008
128 130 132 134 136
SE2012May20A.png
May 20, 2012
SE2016Mar09T.png
March 9, 2016
SE2019Dec26A.png
December 26, 2019
SE2023Oct14A.png
October 14, 2023
SE2027Aug02T.png
August 2, 2027
138 140 142 144 146
SE2031May21A.png
May 21, 2031
SE2035Mar09A.png
March 9, 2035
SE2038Dec26T.png
December 26, 2038
SE2042Oct14A.png
October 14, 2042
SE2046Aug02T.png
August 2, 2046
148 150 152 154 156
SE2050May20H.png
May 20, 2050
SE2054Mar09P.png
March 9, 2054
SE2057Dec26T.png
December 26, 2057
SE2061Oct13A.png
October 13, 2061
SE2065Aug02P.png
August 2, 2065
158 160 162 164 166
SE2069May20P.png
May 20, 2069
March 8, 2073 December 26, 2076 October 13, 2080 August 1, 2084

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "EclipseWise - Eclipses During 2019". eclipsewise.com. Retrieved 2019-07-25.
  2. ^ "Annular Solar Eclipse on December 26, 2019". www.timeanddate.com. Retrieved 2019-07-25.
  3. ^ Cooper, Gael (2017-08-22). "Wait! Dig those eclipse glasses out of the garbage Here comes the sun. Astronomers Without Borders will be collecting the protective eyewear for use in future eclipses worldwide". Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  4. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.
  5. ^ Note S1: Eclipses & Predictions in Freeth, Tony (2014). "Eclipse Prediction on the Ancient Greek Astronomical Calculating Machine Known as the Antikythera Mechanism". PLOS ONE. 9 (7): e103275. Bibcode:2014PLoSO...9j3275F. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0103275. PMC 4116162. PMID 25075747.

References[edit]