Solar eclipse of July 2, 2019

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Solar eclipse of July 2, 2019
20190702 Totality LaSerena Chile.jpg
Totality viewed from La Serena, Chile
SE2019Jul02T.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NatureTotal
Gamma-0.6466
Magnitude1.0459
Maximum eclipse
Duration273 sec (4 m 33 s)
Coordinates17°24′S 109°00′W / 17.4°S 109°W / -17.4; -109
Max. width of band201 km (125 mi)
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse19:24:08
References
Saros127 (58 of 82)
Catalog # (SE5000)9551

A total solar eclipse occurred at the ascending node of the Moon's orbit on July 2, 2019, with an eclipse magnitude of 1.0459. Totality was visible from the southern Pacific Ocean east of New Zealand to the Coquimbo Region in Chile and Central Argentina at sunset, with the maximum of 4 minutes 32 seconds visible from the Pacific Ocean. The Moon was only 2.4 days before perigee (Perigee on July 5, 2019), making it fairly large.

Another solar eclipse occurred one lunar year after this eclipse, on June 21, 2020. A total solar eclipse crossed this region of the Earth on December 14, 2020.

Images[edit]

Animated path
Geostationary satellite view of the eclipse by NOAA's GOES East. Hurricane Barbara can also be seen in the northern hemisphere.

Visibility[edit]

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is larger than the Sun's, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across Earth's surface, with the partial solar eclipse visible over a surrounding region thousands of kilometres wide.

Following the North American solar eclipse of August 21, 2017, Astronomers Without Borders collected eclipse glasses for redistribution to Latin America and Asia for the 2019 eclipses.[1]

Totality travelled over areas with low levels of humidity and light pollution, allowing for very good observations. Several major observatories experienced totality, including the European Southern Observatory.[2][3]

Oeno Island[edit]

The first land surface and the only Pacific island from which totality would have been visible is Oeno Island, an uninhabited atoll in the Pitcairn Islands.[3]

Chile[edit]

Totality was visible in a large portion of Coquimbo Region and small parts of Atacama Region. Cities in the path include La Serena and La Higuera. Approximately 300,000 people visited La Serena to view the event.[2] Tickets to view the eclipse from the European Southern Observatory were sold for US$2000 each.[3]

Argentina[edit]

Totality was visible in the provinces of San Juan, La Rioja, San Luis, Córdoba, Santa Fe, and Buenos Aires. Cities in the path include San Juan and Río Cuarto.[3] The path of the totality was finishing at the Samborombon Bay, where the eclipsed suunset was observed from San Clemente del Tuyu.

The total solar eclipse at sunset seen from San Clemente del Tuyu above Samborombon Bay (credits: Atcco SRL).

Another 130 km further south-east, the local inhabitants could watch the total solar eclipse plunge below the horizon. There are reports from the Atlantic coast, where the fleeting umbra was recorded in the Santa Teresita and Pinamar resorts.[4]

Gallery[edit]

Related eclipses[edit]

Eclipses of 2019[edit]

Tzolkinex[edit]

Half-Saros cycle[edit]

Tritos[edit]

Solar Saros 127[edit]

Inex[edit]

Triad[edit]

Solar eclipses of 2018–2021[edit]

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[5]

Note: Partial solar eclipses on February 15, 2018, and August 11, 2018, occurred during the previous semester series.

Solar eclipse series sets from 2018–2021
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
107 2017 July 23 -2.14244 112 2018 January 17 1.78677
117
Eclipse (41629136430).jpg
Partial from Melbourne, Australia
2018 July 13
SE2018Jul13P.png
Partial
-1.35423 122
Solar eclipse of January 6, 2019 in Nakhodka, Primorsky Krai.jpg
Partial from Nakhodka, Russia
2019 January 6
SE2019Jan06P.png
Partial
1.14174
127
20190702 Totality LaSerena Chile.jpg
La Serena, Chile
2019 July 2
SE2019Jul02T.png
Total
-0.64656 132
Annular Solar Eclipse in Jaffna - 26 December 2019 (1).jpg
Jaffna, Sri Lanka
2019 December 26
SE2019Dec26A.png
Annular
0.41351
137
Solar eclipse of 21 June 2020 in Beigang, Yunlin, Taiwan.jpg
Beigang, Yunlin, Taiwan
2020 June 21
SE2020Jun21A.png
Annular
0.12090 142
Eclipse total Gorbea 2020.jpg
Gorbea, Chile
2020 December 14
SE2020Dec14T.png
Total
-0.29394
147 2021 June 10
SE2021Jun10A.png
Annular
0.91516 152 2021 December 4
SE2021Dec04T.png
Total
-0.95261
157 2022 May 30 1.65174 162 2022 November 23 -1.69875

Saros 127[edit]

It is a part of Saros cycle 127, repeating every 18 years, 11 days, containing 82 events. The series started with partial solar eclipse on October 10, 991 AD. It contains total eclipses from May 14, 1352 through August 15, 2091. There are no annular eclipses in this series. The series ends at member 82 as a partial eclipse on March 21, 2452. The longest duration of totality was 5 minutes, 40 seconds on August 30, 1532. All eclipses in this series occurs at the Moon’s ascending node.[6]

Series members 52–68 occur between 1901 and 2200
52 53 54
SE1911Apr28T.png
April 28, 1911
SE1929May09T.png
May 9, 1929
SE1947May20T.png
May 20, 1947
55 56 57
SE1965May30T.png
May 30, 1965
SE1983Jun11T.png
June 11, 1983
SE2001Jun21T.png
June 21, 2001
58 59 60
SE2019Jul02T.png
July 2, 2019
SE2037Jul13T.png
July 13, 2037
SE2055Jul24T.png
July 24, 2055
61 62 63
SE2073Aug03T.png
August 3, 2073
SE2091Aug15T.png
August 15, 2091
August 26, 2109 (Partial)
64 65 66
September 6, 2127 (Partial September 16, 2145 (Partial) September 28, 2163 (Partial)
67 68
October 8, 2181 (Partial) October 19, 2199 (Partial)

Inex series[edit]

This eclipse is a part of the long period inex cycle, repeating at alternating nodes, every 358 synodic months (≈ 10,571.95 days, or 29 years minus 20 days). Their appearance and longitude are irregular due to a lack of synchronization with the anomalistic month (period of perigee). However, groupings of 3 inex cycles (≈ 87 years minus 2 months) comes close (≈ 1,151.02 anomalistic months), so eclipses are similar in these groupings.

In the 19th century:

  • Solar Saros 120: Total Solar Eclipse of 1816 Nov 19
  • Solar Saros 121: Hybrid Solar Eclipse of 1845 Oct 30
  • Solar Saros 122: Annular Solar Eclipse of 1874 Oct 10

In the 22nd century:

  • Solar Saros 130: Total Solar Eclipse of 2106 May 3
  • Solar Saros 131: Annular Solar Eclipse of 2135 Apr 13
  • Solar Saros 132: Hybrid Solar Eclipse of 2164 Mar 23
  • Solar Saros 133: Total Solar Eclipse of 2193 Mar 03

Metonic series[edit]

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's ascending node.

21 eclipse events, progressing from south to north between July 1, 2000 and July 1, 2076
July 1–2 April 19–20 February 5–7 November 24–25 September 12–13
107 109 111 113 115
July 1, 1981 April 20, 1985 February 6, 1989 November 24, 1992 September 12, 1996
117 119 121 123 125
SE2000Jul01P.png
July 1, 2000
SE2004Apr19P.png
April 19, 2004
SE2008Feb07A.png
February 7, 2008
SE2011Nov25P.png
November 25, 2011
SE2015Sep13P.png
September 13, 2015
127 129 131 133 135
SE2019Jul02T.png
July 2, 2019
SE2023Apr20H.png
April 20, 2023
SE2027Feb06A.png
February 6, 2027
SE2030Nov25T.png
November 25, 2030
SE2034Sep12A.png
September 12, 2034
137 139 141 143 145
SE2038Jul02A.png
July 2, 2038
SE2042Apr20T.png
April 20, 2042
SE2046Feb05A.png
February 5, 2046
SE2049Nov25H.png
November 25, 2049
SE2053Sep12T.png
September 12, 2053
147 149 151 153 155
SE2057Jul01A.png
July 1, 2057
SE2061Apr20T.png
April 20, 2061
SE2065Feb05P.png
February 5, 2065
SE2068Nov24P.png
November 24, 2068
SE2072Sep12T.png
September 12, 2072
157 159 161 163 165
SE2076Jul01P.png
July 1, 2076
April 19, 2080 February 6, 2084 November 25, 2087 September 13, 2091

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cooper, Gael (2017-08-22). "Wait! Dig those eclipse glasses out of the garbage Here comes the sun. Astronomers Without Borders will be collecting the protective eyewear for use in future eclipses worldwide". Retrieved 2017-08-27.
  2. ^ a b "Total solar eclipse: thousands in Chile and Argentina marvel at 'something supreme'". The Guardian. 2019-07-02. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2019-07-02.
  3. ^ a b c d "Total solar eclipse hits South America". BBC News. 2019-07-02. Retrieved 2019-07-02.
  4. ^ "Solar eclipse below the horizon 2019 – the World's first webcam observation". MkrGeo. 17 February 2020. Retrieved 10 October 2020.
  5. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.
  6. ^ "Solar Saros series 127". NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. NASA. Retrieved 2 November 2017.

Additional sources[edit]

External links[edit]